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Publication numberUS891161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1908
Filing dateMay 7, 1907
Priority dateMay 7, 1907
Publication numberUS 891161 A, US 891161A, US-A-891161, US891161 A, US891161A
InventorsPercy H Goodwin
Original AssigneePercy H Goodwin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic adjustable gem-holder.
US 891161 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 891,161. PATENTED JUNE 16, 1908.

P. H. GOODWIN.

AUTOMATIC ADJUSTABLE GEM HOLDERu Ai PLIGATION FILED MAY 7. 1907.

WITNESSES: I IVENTOR.

A TTORN E Y.

UNITED STATES PATENT ()FFICE.

PERCY H. GOODWIN, OF SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA.

AUTOMATIC ADJUSTABLE GEM-HOLDER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 16, 1908.

Application filed May 7, 1907. Serial No. 372,422.

displaying different sizes of gems, as though they were mounted in regular settings.

A further object is to so construct the ring that its prong-carrying ends are always retained in proper alinement thereby preventing the ring from being twisted laterally out of shape.

The invention contemplates the use of a band or ring of resilient material, such as spring metal, having a longitudinal slot entering from one end and its other end notched laterally and arranged in said slot. Gem holding prongs are formed on each end of the band or ring, there being one at each side of the longitudinal slot in one end.

The invention further consists in the features of construction and combinations of parts hereinafter described and specified in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, illustrating the preferred embodiment of my invention: Figure 1 is a front view of the ring showing a gem held in its prongs for displaying. Fig. 2 is a side view of said ring with the gem removed. Fig. 3 is a top plan view of Fig. 2, and Fig. 4 is a view of the strip of material from which the ring is made before it is bent into a circlet.

Referring more particularly to the drawing A designates the gem holding or gripping prongs arranged at either side of the longitudinal slot 0 in one end of the band or ring. On the other end of said band are formed the prongs B which oppose the prongs A and serve to hold a gem as in a permanent setting. The end carrying the prongs B is notched laterally, as at D, so that it fits in the longitudinal slot 0. This arrangement of the notched end in the slot in the other end serves to always retain the ends in proper alinement and revents said ends from being twisted lateral y out of shape as might be done if said ring were made in the form of an open circle.

In use the ends of the rings may be easily spread apart to receive a gem by pressing upon the opposite sides of said ring. The longitudinal slot is long enough to permit the prongs to be spread apart sufficiently to receive a very large gem and at the same time, when relieved from pressure, said prongs will close upon a small gem, the resiliency of the material of which the ring is made causing said prongs to firmly grip and hold gems of various sizes.

I claim,

1. An adjustable gem holder comprising a resilient ring having opposed gem holding prongs at its ends, said prongs being normally in close relation and requiring to be sprung apart in order to receive and have holding enga ement with a gem, said ring being provided with a longitudinal slot entering from one end thereof and the other end notched laterally and arranged in said slot.

2. An adjustable gem holder comprising a resilient ring having opposed gem holding prongs at its ends, sai prongs being nor mally in close relation and requiring to be sprung apart in order to receive and have holding engagement with a gem, said ring being provided with a longitudinal slot entering from one end thereof and the other end notched laterally and arranged in said slot, the extremity of said notched end being as broad as the other end.

3. An adjustable gem holder comprising a resilient ring having opposed gem holding prongs at its ends, said prongs being normally in close relation and requiring to be sprung apart in order to receive and have holding en a ement with a gem, said ring being providec with a longitudinal slot entering from one end thereof with a prong at each side of said slot and the other end notched laterally and arranged in said slot.

4. An adjustable gem holder comprising a resilient ring having opposed gem holding prongs at its ends, said prongs being nornotched laterally and arranged in said slot;

mally in close relation and requiring to be sprung apart in order to receive and have apart prongs.

holding engagement with agern, said ring be- PERCY H. GOODWIN. ing pfi'ovided with a longitudinal slot enter- Witnesses: in cm one end thereof with a prong at ADOLF BEYER,

J. W. MASTER.

each side of said slot and the other end said notched end also carrying two spaced

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4033143 *Feb 11, 1976Jul 5, 1977Doreen Elizabeth MichaelClip ring
US9468269 *Jul 21, 2015Oct 18, 2016Joseph MachiniInterchangeable jewelry setting system
US20110179826 *Jan 28, 2010Jul 28, 2011Arie NhaissiFinger Ring for Holding Interchangeable Gems
US20130074547 *Nov 20, 2012Mar 28, 2013Arie NhaissiFinger Ring for Holding Interchangeable Gems
US20150320155 *Jul 21, 2015Nov 12, 2015Joseph MachiniInterchangeable jewelry setting system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA44C17/0208