Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS891181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1908
Filing dateMay 8, 1907
Priority dateMay 8, 1907
Publication numberUS 891181 A, US 891181A, US-A-891181, US891181 A, US891181A
InventorsPhil Mitchell
Original AssigneePhil Mitchell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inflatable bandage.
US 891181 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PTENTED JUNE 16, 1908.

P. MITCHELL. yM11-LATABLE BANDAGE.

APLIOVATION FILED HAY B. 1907.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 14.

No. 891,181. PATENTE .TUNE 16. N08.

` P. MI'TGHELL.

INFLATABLE BANDAGE.

APPLICATION-FILED MAY 8, 1907.

2 SHBETS-SHBBT 2.

enti. Mirensntyornotin ISLAND, iLLrNois.

INFLATABLE BANDAGE.

Application filed May S, 1907.

Specification of Letters Patent.'

Patented June 16, 190s.

semi N0. 372,484.

1 o crt uvm/b tt may concern:

Be it known that l, PHIL MITCHELL, a citizen of the United States of America, and resident of Rock island, Rock Island county, Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Inflatable Bandages, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in surgical bandages, and more especially to those used to protect a limb after a fracture.

A. further obj ect is to provide an appliance `by means of which a constant'pressure may be exerted on all parts of the limb and at the same time prevent any displacement thereof.

A further object is the production of an inilatablf bandage that can be readily laced or fastened in place, and one that can be as readily removed at times when it is desired to inspect the limb.

A further object is the production of a device which can be cheaply constructed, and yet one that will efficiently' serve 'the purpose for which it is desired.

These and such other objects may hercinafter appear` are attained by my device, embodiments of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 represents a plan view showing a double bandage applied to a compound fracture of the arm. Fig. 2 is a cross section on the line 2 2 of F ig. 1, looking in the direc tion indicated. by the arrows. Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line of Fig. 2, looking in the direction indicated by the ar.- rows. Fig. 4 is a perspeotivefview of another form of my device inflated and laced. apart from a limb. Fig. 5 shows a portion ofthe devioeillustrated in Fig. 4, arranged in position on a limb. Fig. 6 sbowsa plan view of a i form of clamp. Fig. I is a'i'crtical sectional view of Fig. 6. Fig. 8 shows a i'nodified form of supporting rods secured in place. Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view on the line 9-9 of Fig'. 23', looking in the direction indicated by thearrows. Fig. 10 is a vertical sectional view on the line 10-itl of Fig. el, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Like letters of reference indicate like parts in the several iigures of t1 :.e drawing.

it eferring by' numerals to the accompany ing (.lrawings. fi-et representthe'two sec' tions of un inflatable bandage comprising outer folds, 5 represents the outer folds, .6 r-presents the inner folds, of flexible air tight nuiterinl.

These folds are firmly secured at their ends to reinfoicmfr strips 7-7.

bone or some iexible material secured to the reinforcing strips 7-7. The bandages terminate in reduced end portions 9-9adapted to fit closely one over' the other when the bandage is placed about the limb 9a. Suitable fastening means, such as hooks, 10 are secured to the opposite ends of said bandage, and an ordinary lacing string i1 is used to secure the ends ofthe bandage together. It will be noted that there is a space 12 between the inner and outer folds, access to which space ishad through an ordinary tube-or valve i3.

In the device as shown in Fig. 1 the portions 4-4 are connected together by means of a connecting strip 14, this form of bandage being designed to accommodate a compound fracture occurring above and below the elbow or knee. In the event of a simple fracture, or a compound fracture of any one bone, only one section of the bandage is used. When the bandage is securely laced in place and air forced through the valve .13, the entire space between the folds is iniiatcd. At the. point lof connection of the ends of the bandage pockets lvel oppositely disposed,

but separated by the folds of the bandage,v

are also inliated, thus forming a continuous neuinatic cushion around the entire mem'n fel- In Figs. 4, et seq., l have shown a bandage in which the reinforcing strips 7 are dispensed with, and the stiffening stripst$-- $a are secured directly to the outer fold of thc bandage, as shown at 17. lt is not intended to malte the portion between the strips 5-8 inflatable. The ends iti- 19 of the bandage are laced`cl'osely' together, so Ias to make practically a continuous air cushion about the limb, the same as accomplished by the form shown in Fig. 2. Secured to the bandage between the lower ends of the stripsl and the upper'ends of the strips 8a are a series of supports 20, best shown in Figs. 6 and 7. These supports or clamps are secured to the bandage 1n any ordinary manner, as by sewing or by rivets 21. These clamps are pro'- vided with sockets 22 of any desired shape to accommodate the reception of 'the ands of the supporting rods 23, and also provided with clamping rows '24. A series of clamping rods 245, of any desired shape, are adapted to be secured in said supports, shownin Fig. 5. I have shown, in Figs. S and i), a

form of supporting r'od 25 with flattened ends '26, having inwardly turned flanges 27. In

the use ofthis form, I makel the ends of the strips 8-8L slightlyI enlarged, so that the ends of the rods 28 may bev held in place, thus doing away with the supports 20.

In the ordinary cases of broken ar'ms, a certain angle of repose is generally recommended and the'curvature, length and shape of the r'ods may be designed to conform to this angle, while in other andextraordinary cases different rods or degrees of` cur'vature, or of no'eurvature at all, may be required. In eases of an ordinary practitioner', 'a few shapes would be needed, while a busy surgeon would require quite an assortment.

In the ordinary treatment of fractur'es of the limbs, it has been the custom to either bandage the limb tightly and inclose it in stiff splints, or to embed the member 'in a plaster' cast. In the event that splints ar'e used it is quite a difficult matter to remove the bandage in or'der' to inspect the limb, while in the'ease of the plaster' cast it can only be r'ernoved by breaking. After' frac ture and the replacement of the bones in place, the limb is considerably swollen and inflamed. This being the case, after the bandage or laster' cast is in place, great discomfort am pain results fr'orn the pressure exer'ted by the bandage or cast, especially as it is necessary to have the bandage tightly wound about the limb so that when the inflammation is reduced the limb may be tightly confined within the bandage. In

-nearly all cases, and especially wher'e joints are involved, there is considerable ine uality between the different parts of the linil), and. as the fracture heals and the inflamed and swollen par'ts resurne their normal size, cavi g ties ar'e apt to occur between the bandages or casts and the limb with a consequent danger of chafing. After' the bandage is first put on, the )atient is apt to suffer great pain 'lor aconsirerable time, owing to the tights ness of the bandage, and no reliefcan be afforded in this event. Laten after the inflammation has subsided and the swelling gone down, the bandage or cast fails to er-4 form. the function for which it was intent ed, inrthat it does not snugly confine the limb. .By the use of my improved device,l however',

the pressure by which the bandage is held against the limb may be varied to suit the exigencies of the case. In operation, say for instance a fracture of the arm below the elbow as shown in h'rgf 1, the bandage la is placedv about the arm and laced snugly in place, the reinforcing strips 7 being forced snugly against the arm, Air is then introduced into the cavity 12 through the valve 13, either by the ordinary method of inflating a foot ball by blowing it up, or by use of a bicycle pump, or like ap aratus. The air may be introduced in suc quantity as de- 'forrn to the inequalities of the limb and 1press sired in order' to a'ttain any desired pressure against the limb. The inner folds 6 will contightly against all par'ts thereof wit an equal pressure. In the first,stages of the healing process, when the patient suffers considerable pain, the air pressure may be reduced at times in order'to in a sense relieve the sufferer', while at the same time the pressure can be maintained at as great a degree as desired. By the use of the stiffening strips S-8P any desired longitudinal rigidity of the bandage rrray be attained Without sacrificing any of the flexibility thereof. However, it may be practical todo away with the stiffening and reinforcing strips and make the outer' fold of the bandage of sufficient rigidity to serve the same purpose.

While the device is especially applicable in the case of fractures of the limbs, it maybe easily adapted to fractures of the r'ibs .or' other' parts of the body, and many modifications of details of arrangement and construction may be used without in any sense departing from the spirit of my invention;

I claim;

l. A surgical appliance comprising an inflatable bandage, stiflening means secur'ed to the outer' surface thereof means adapted to secure' said bandagev in place about a member, the ends of said bandage meeting whereby the merrrber' is entirely surrounded by the inflatablefportion of said bandage, and means for infl-ating said bandage. l

2. A surgical appliance comprising an inllatable bandage, reinforcing strips secured to the sides thereof, means for securing said bandage in place, and means for inflating said bandage. 3. A surgical appliance comprising an 'in'- flatable bandage, reinforcing strips 'secured to the sides thereof, stiflening strips extending transversely of said bandage, nreans for securing said bandage in for inflating said bandage.

4f A surgical appliance comprising an `inflatable bandage, reinforcing strips secured to the sides thereof, stiffening strips extending transversely thereof and Asecur'ed to said reinforcing strips, means for securing said place, and means bandage in place, and means for inflating said bandage.

5. An inflatable bandage comprising a plurality of thicknesses of air tight flexible material, reinforcing strips` securing said ma# ter'ial together', stiffenmg strips adapted to hold saidi material in any desired shape, means for securing said material in place `on the body, and means for admitting air be# tween the separate thickness or folds thereof.k

` 6. An inflatable bandage com rising'aplurality of folds, of airtight flexi le material, reinforcing strips of like material firml. securing the edges of said. mate-r'ial togetlji'er, a series of flexible stiifening strips connecting ISO series of flexible stiffening strips connecting opposite reinforcing strips, fastening means for securing said banda re in Y)lace about a member, and means for inilating said menibei', said bandage being so arranged that everyportion of the circumference of the member is protected by a pneumatic cushion.

An inflatable bandage com )rising a plurality of finds, of air tight ilexi le material, reinforcing strips of like material firmly securing the edges of said material together, series of flexible stiliening strips connecting opposite reinforcing strips, a series of lacing for securing said bandage in place about a member, and means for` inflating said meinber, said bandage being so arranged that everjr portion of the circumference of the member is protected by a pneumatic cushion. 9. A surgical appliance comprising the combination ol' a bandage adapted to sur- -iound a member 'and inflatable throughout its entire length, witlnstiilcning :means secured to the outer surface thereof.

10. A surgical appliance comprising the combination of an inflatable bandage withV stiifening means secured to the outer surface thereof, and extending lengthwise thereof, whereb)Y the inflatable member is positioned between that portion Aol' the bod)v under treatment and the stiffcning means.

11. A'surgical appliance comprising the crnnbination of an inflatable bandage .with stiiliening means secured to the outer surface thereof, and extending lengthwise thereof, whereby the inflatable member is positioned between that portion of thc body under treatment and the stille/ning means, together with means forinllating said bandage.

12. A surgical appliance comprising` a bandage, means for inllating portions thereof, means for securing said bar ulage in position, and means whereby said portions may be retained in any desired angular relation. to cach other,

i3. A surgical appliance comprising a bandage, means for inllatiiw portions thereof, means for securing saidbandage inzvposition, and means whereby said Aportions may be retained in 'any' desired angular relation to each other, said means comprising su porting rods corinectingr the adjacent en s of said portions.`

14. A surgical appliance comprising a bandage, means for inflating portions thereof, means for securing said bandage in position, and means whereby said. portions may be retained in any desired angular relation 'to cach other, said means comprising adjustable su porting rods connecting the'adjacent en s or said portions.

lfA' .surgical appliance comprising a bandage, means for inflating portions thereof, means for securing said bandage in position, and means whereby said portions may be retained in any desired angular relationl to each other, said means comprising adjust-v able curved supporting rods connecting the adjacent ends'of said portions.

16. it surgical appliance comprising a bandage, meansfor iiiflatincr portions thereof, means 'for securing said bandage in position, means whereby said por ions may be retained in an desired angular relation to each other, said means comprising a series of o positely disposed pairs of clamping inemoers secured to 4adjacent ends of said portions, and a series of rods engaging said opposite clamping members. j

17. A surgical appliance comprising a bandage, portions of which areadapted to be inflated, means for inilating said. portions, stilfening strips secured to said bandage, a series of supports secured to the adjoining ends of said stiiening strips, and means l'or

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2467907 *Nov 30, 1946Apr 19, 1949Peckham Arthur CCorrective and protective knee brace
US3581741 *Nov 4, 1968Jun 1, 1971Maurice RosmanKnee brace
US3993056 *Jan 21, 1976Nov 23, 1976Institut National De La Sante Et De La Recherche MedicaleOrthopaedic appliances
US4378009 *Jan 14, 1980Mar 29, 1983Donald RowleyBrace for injured parts of the body
US4938207 *Oct 20, 1986Jul 3, 1990Alexander C. VargoKnee brace having plurality of fluid filled chambers surrounding knee
US4953543 *Aug 9, 1988Sep 4, 1990Royce Medical CompanyCruciate ligament leg brace
US5230695 *Jul 10, 1992Jul 27, 1993Silver Daniel MKnee brace suspension system including non-slippage inflatable air pillows
US6416534Oct 10, 2000Jul 9, 2002Sunbeam Products, Inc.Portable heating pad with removable heat pad, removable gel pack and pressure bladder
US6447467 *Aug 16, 1999Sep 10, 2002Medical Compression Systems (D.B.N.)Device for pressurizing limbs
US6620116 *Dec 8, 2000Sep 16, 2003Michael P. LewisExternal counterpulsation unit
US7074200Jun 26, 2003Jul 11, 2006Lewis Michael PExternal pulsation unit cuff
US7585285Apr 1, 2004Sep 8, 2009Arnis PoneAnkle stress relief device
US7641623Apr 8, 2004Jan 5, 2010Hill-Rom Services, Inc.System for compression therapy with patient support
US7981066May 24, 2006Jul 19, 2011Michael Paul LewisExternal pulsation treatment apparatus
US8523796 *Aug 15, 2012Sep 3, 2013Ibtesam M. Y. MustafaInflatable splint
US8784346Dec 16, 2005Jul 22, 2014Medical Compression Systems, (Dbn) Ltd.Portable ambulant pneumatic compression system
WO1990001307A1 *Jun 13, 1989Feb 22, 1990Royce Medical CoCruciate ligament leg brace
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/20, A61F5/05816