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Publication numberUS891406 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1908
Filing dateDec 11, 1907
Priority dateDec 11, 1907
Publication numberUS 891406 A, US 891406A, US-A-891406, US891406 A, US891406A
InventorsGeorge Cassens
Original AssigneeGeorge Cassens
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eaves-trough.
US 891406 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' "BATENTED JUNE 23, 1908.

G. GASSENS. EAVES THOUGH. APPLICATION FILED DEC. 11. 1907.

GEORGE OASSENS, OF HAMEL, ILLINOIS.

E AVE S-TROUGH.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 23, 1908.

Application filed December 11, 1907. Serial No. 406,055.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE OAssENs, a citizen of the United States, residing at Hamel, in the county of Madison and State of Illinois, have invented a new and useful Eaves-Trough, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to eaves troughs.

The object of the invention is in a ready and practical manner to preclude entrance of vegetable matter, such as leaves and twigs, to the trough; to prevent birds from building their nests in the trough; to insure the conservation of practically clean rain water for human consum tion; to facilitate cleaning of the trough, siould the occasion arise therefor; and generally to improve, simplify, and render more efficient and durab e eaves troughs of that character employing shields or covers.

With the above and other objects in view, as will appear as the nature of the invention is better understood, the same consists in the novel construction and combination of partsof an eaves trough, as will be hereinafter more fully described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification, and in which like characters of reference indicate corresponding parts, Figure 1 is a view in perspective of one form of caves trough embodying the features of the present invention. Fig. 2 is a vertical transverse section through another form of eaves trough. Fig. 3 is a similar view of still another form of eaves trough. Fig. 4 is K a perspective detail view of a brace employed in sup orting the outer edge of the trough from t e eaves of a building, and also for holding, or assisting in holding, the cover or shield in operative position relatively to the trough. Fig. 5 is a detail sectional view showing a slightly modified construction wherein the body terminates at the back below the cover and the brace extends to and interlocks with the cover.

Referring to the drawings, and to Fig. 1 thereof, E designates generally the eaves of a building and S the shingles thereof. These parts may be of the usual or any referred construction, and, therefore, nee no further description.

The trough 1 may be of the ordinary semicircular type, but in the present instance it is preferred to employ one having a fiat bottom, a vertical rear wall 2 and an ogeecurved forward wall'3 terminating in a vertical lip 4, the upper edgelof which is rebent at 5. This general contour is common to all of the forms herein shown, with slight variations that will be hereinafter referred to.

The rear wall of the trough is secured to the eaves by braces of somewhat peculiar construction, one of each of which is shown in the three figures exhibiting the trough, and in detail in Fig. 4. The brace comprises an approximately horizontally disposed member 6, having at its rear end an upward projecting member 7 disposed at approximately right angles to the member 6 and provided with orifices 8 to receive nails or screws 9 by which to secure it to the eaves, and at its front end with a downward projecting member 10 disposed at approximately right angles to the member 6 and withan angularly disposed forwardly projecting compound curved member 11. The members 10 and 11 are formed by longitudi nally' incising the brace, and deflecting or bending the arms thus formed to provide the two members 10 and 11. The member 10 is provided with an orifice 12 through which asses a rivet 13 that projects through the ip 4 and is upset.

The member 11 is engaged by the lower inourved edge 14 of the shield or cover 15, which is an imp'erforate structure, the rear edge of which is formed into an approximately V-shaped lip or cleat 16 that is designed to interlock with the upper edge 17 of the rear wall of the trough which is deflected at an angle to its length for this purpose, as

is also the upper end of the member 7 of the brace.

There will be sufficient space provided between the shingles S and the cleat 16 and terminal 17 of the brace to permit the shield readily tobe disconnected when it is desired to remove the cover for the purpose of cleansing the trough.

Generally, the hooked connection between the front edge of the cover and the member 11 of the brace will be am ly sufficient to hold the parts assembled but as a matter of additional security, the member 10 of the brace may be provided with an angularly disposed orifice 18 through which will be driven a pin or stud 19 which will bear against the curved portion 14 of the shield, as clearly shown in Fig. 1.

In the form of invention shown in Fig. 2, the rear member 7 of the brace terminates some distance short of the upper edge of the rear wall of the trough, and, instead of the cleat 20 that connects the shield with the out-turned lip 21 of the trough being angular, it is yoke-shaped. With this difference, the construction of the two forms of caves troughs are substantially the same.

In the form of the invention shown in Fig, 3, the member 7 of the brace extends nearly to the upper edge of the rear wall of the trough, and the member 11 of the brace is a true curve, instead of a compound curve, as shown in the other figures.

In addition to the nails or screws 9 for holding the brace and the trough assembled with the eaves, the rear wall of the trough and the member 7 of the brace are additionally connected by rivets 22.

In Fig. 5, there is shown another slightly modified arrangement wherein the back 2 of the body terminates below the lane of the rear edge of the cover 15, and t e brace 6 has a vertical extension 7 at its rear end which extends up to and interlocks with the rear edge of the cover in a manner similar to the interlock of the back with the cover, as indicated in Figs. 2 and 3.

A feature of novelty common to each form shown is the fact that the front wall 14 of the shield is in vertical alinement with the inner side of the lip 4, and this will prevent vegetable matter, such as leaves, twigs, and the like, from passing into the trough, and these will be discharged over the wall 14, while the ure, clean water will follow the shield and e discharged into the trough. This latter construction will insure the conservation of rain water in such form as will best adapt it for human consumption.

It will be seen from the foregoing description, that all the improvements herein defined are simple in character, that they will be thoroughly efficient for the purposes designed, and will, in a practical manner, secure all of the objects stated.

I claim 1. The combination with an eaves trough, of a brace secured thereto and rovided with an upstanding member, and a s iield having a part to be sprung into interlocked engagement with the member.

2. The combination with an eaves trough, of a brace riveted to the front and rear walls thereof and provided at its forward portion with an upstanding member, and a shield adapted to be sprung into interlocked engagement with the member and with the upper edge of the rear wall of the trough.

3. The combination with an eaves trough having a vertical front wall, of a brace riveted to the front and rear walls of the trough and provided at its forward portion with an upstanding member, and a shield or cover a apted to be sprung into interlocked engagement with the member and with the upper edge of the rear wall of the trough and having its front wall arranged in alinement with the like wall of the trough.

4. The combination with an eaves trough, of a brace secured to the front and rear walls thereof and provided at its forward portion GEORGE CASSENS. Witnesses H. E. WOLF, (bus. 0. WELKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2672832 *Jan 12, 1951Mar 23, 1954Goetz Alfred KEaves trough
US2873700 *Aug 28, 1953Feb 17, 1959Heier Henry CShielded eaves troughs
US4796390 *Nov 12, 1987Jan 10, 1989Demartini Robert JRain gutter devices
US5040750 *May 1, 1990Aug 20, 1991Gsw Inc.Eavestrough hook and leaf guard
US5271192 *May 6, 1992Dec 21, 1993Nothum Sr AlfredGutter hanger and screen assembly
US5737879 *Mar 31, 1997Apr 14, 1998Sweet; Vernon L.Debris blocking gutter and support hanger
US6453622Jun 12, 2001Sep 24, 2002Senox CorporationDiversion system and method
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US6568132Nov 15, 2001May 27, 2003A. B. WaltersDiversion system and method
US6745517Jul 11, 2002Jun 8, 2004Wayne VahldieckLeaf repellant gutter bracket
US6993870Jun 10, 2003Feb 7, 2006Quality Edge, Inc.Rain gutter guard and method
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US7707781 *Mar 9, 2009May 4, 2010Van Mark Products CorporationGutter cap assembly and bracket
US7721489 *Nov 26, 2007May 25, 2010Metal-Era, Inc.Vented gutter and fascia systems
US7765742Nov 12, 2004Aug 3, 2010Ealer Sr James EdwardGutter cover
US7861990Nov 30, 2007Jan 4, 2011Barnes Michael SCombination awning bracket and light support system
US7891142Apr 23, 2007Feb 22, 2011Ealer Sr James EGutter protection system
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US8117785Jul 27, 2005Feb 21, 2012Quality Edge, Inc.Gutter system
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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2001/1666, E03F1/002