Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS893237 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1908
Filing dateJan 23, 1908
Priority dateJan 23, 1908
Publication numberUS 893237 A, US 893237A, US-A-893237, US893237 A, US893237A
InventorsCharles H Gifford
Original AssigneeCharles H Gifford
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pin and the like.
US 893237 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 893,237. PATENTED JULY14, 190s.:

- c. H'. GIPPORD.

PIN AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 23, 1908.

atboznu CHARLES H. GIFFORD, OF ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS.

PIN AND THE LIKE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented .uly 1.4, 198.

Application filed January 23, 1908. Serial No. 412,274.

To all 'whom it may concern.'

Be it known th'at I, CHARLES I-I. GIFFORD, a citizen of the United States, residing at the town of Attleboro, in the county of Bristol and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Pins and the Like, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawing.

This invention relates to pins, buttons and the like, and has for its obj ect to provide a simple and effective means whereby a strong and durable, yet very inexpensive pin or button, having a thin shell of precious or other metal, may be constructed.

This pin is made of a heavy body portion or supporting c ore to which the attaching means may be connected. This core is then provided with a covering or shell having a comparatively thin back plate, andan eX- tremely thin front plate, and the edge of the former is rolled over that of the latter.

In ordinary pins the construction is the reverse to the present form, that is, the front plate is rolled over the back plate and it is found necessary to make the front plate of' considerable thickness in order that it 'shall Abe strong or stiff enough to hold the parts to gether in a practical manner, and when this front plate is made of solid gold it is necessarily expensive on account of this eXtra thickness of stock required to be rolled and retain the parts.

By my improved construction of rolling the back over the front I am enabled to make the front plate of solid gold almost as thin as paper, and yet on account of its figured face and crowning form it possesses suflioient strength and durability to serve its pur ose in a practical manner. The back p ate, which may be of a cheaper grade of material, must be considerably heavier in order to be rolled and hold the parts together.

. Another and essential feature of this construction is that the parts receiving the most strain are strong and heavy, as in the case of a cuff pin the core or central body portion is formed of a less expensive material, such as brass, or the like, with the joint and catch stamped out or formed integral therewith, preferably by drawing or 'forcing the stock from the inner side outward near either end thereof, forming substantially cup-shaped portions, the joint cup having its bottom end removed to receive the eye of the pin-tongue,

while the catch cup is slotted at its side to receive the point of the pin-tongue. A pin of this character may be constructed with great strength Where strength is necessary and entirely covered with a thin shell of precious metal rendering the same handsome and attractive, strong and durable, and at the same time reducing the cost to a minimum.

With these and other objects in view, the

invention consists of certain novel features of construction, as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings: Figure lis a perspective view showing a cuff pin of j my improved construction. Fig. 2-is a central longitudinal sectional view illustrating the construction of my improved pin. Fig. S-is a detail showing the back plate struck up into a cup form having an aperture at either end through which the outwardly projecting catch and joint members of the supporting core extend. Fig. Li-illustrates the heavy supporting core member with its raised joint and catch members integral therewith. Fig. 5 -is a transverse section through the catch portion on line 5-5 of Fig. 2. Fig. 6`is a transverse section through the joint on line 6--6 of Fig. 2. Fig. 7-is a modification illustrating my improved construction of rolling the back plate or binding member over the front as applied to a hat-pin. Fig. 8-

illustrates the back plate or binding member of the hat-pin drawn up into a cup-form with its center portion removed through which center portion the base of the pin stem may be attached to the core. Fig. Q-is another modification showing a binding rim or member surrounding the edge of the core or body portion, the same being rolled over the back of the body for the purpose of holding the front plate in position thereon.

Referring to the drawings, at l is the core which may be made in a form to correspond to the style of pin desired. When that style known as a beauty or cufipin is to be made, this core is preferably formed of a comparatively thick or heavy metal necessary for giving the pin therequired strength and rigidity. As the joint and catch are the portions which require considerable strength it is found particularly advantageous to form them integral with the heavy core. In this particular case I form both the joint member 2 and the Acatch-member 3 by forcing or drawing the stock from the back of the plate Q1lt= ward into a rectangular cup-shape. The bottom portion or outer end of the joint portion being cut away or removed so that the joint end or eye 4 of the pin-tongue 5 may be passed or inserted therein. In order to hold the pin tongue in position in this cup member a pivot may be passed therethrough and riveted in both side walls 6 and 7 of the joint member in the usual way, or the sides of the walls may be forced inward, if desired, as at 8 and 9, into the eye of the pin see Fig. 6 forming a trunnion on which the same may rotate. The upper Vedge of the forward wall 10 of this cup member serves a's the fulcrum lon which the lower side of the pin may rest just before its point enters the catch member. The cup-shaped catch member at the opposite end of this core is cut away at its front edge 11 and also on its side at 12 forming a recess or hook into which the point of the pilitongue 5 may be inserted. By this construction it will be seen that this joint and catch have great strength, the joint in particular, which is obliged to withstand the greatest strains, is formed with four integral walls all adapted to support each other and rendering it almost impossible to be bent or otherwise destroyed. I do not confine myself to making this joint and catch integral with the core member as either one 0r both may be formed independently and secured to said core.

It'is found in practice in the construction of pins of this character very desirable to ornament the front faces with handsome designs ,and in Order to produce this result in the most eifective manner it is advantageous to have this front plate made of as thin material as possible.

By my improved construction, which isobtained by rolling the edge of the back plate over that of the front, enables me to use a stock extremely thin, thereby obtaining numerous advantages, among others being that the ornamentations stamped or embossed thereon are clean out even when the designs embody the finest detail. Then again, by using a thin stock for this front it may be made of solid gold and at the same time, on account of its lightness in weight, its cost is reduced to the minimum. This front plate 13 formed in the man ner above described is preferably made in a crowning shape and with an outwardly extending ridge or flange 14 around it where it sets against the face of the core.

The back plate 15 is preferably struck up into a cup-shape, as best illustrated in Fig. 3, and made of a lower grade of gold than that of the front plate. It is also made of a greater thickness or of a thickness adapted to be rolled and be of suflicient strength to retain the parts in position. The bottom of this cup member is provided at either end with recesses 16 and 17 adapted to it over the outwardly projecting joint and catch members 2 and 3. The upper edge of this cup-member is then rolled over the outwardly extending flange 14 of the front shell and a solid gold shell pin is produced of the strongest possible construction and of the minimum expense.

I do not confine myself to any particular style of pin as any article of jewelry of this general style and construction, such as cull'- pins, brooclies, hat-pins, culi-buttons and the ike, may be made by my improved construetion. Neither do I limit myself to forming the same of any articular material, the greatest advantage, liowever, being gained where the shell is made of the more expensive or precious metals. A hat-pin oi' cull-button ol my improved construction may be formed in the manner best illustrated in Figs. 7 and S, in which the core or body portion 1S is blanked out in the desired shape. The front plate 19 is formed of thin stock having an outwardly extending iiange 2O which engages the front face of said core, The back plate or binding member 21, best illusf i trated in Fig. 8, is made of slightly thicker material and stamped out in a cup-shape with its center portion 22 cut away. The abutting end 24 of the .piii-steiii or shank 25 is secured to the center core or body portion. The member 2]. is then placed in position entirely covering the remaining portion of the core or body member and its upper edge is turned over or rolled onto the extending edge of the front plate thus forming a very neat, strong and inexpensive hat-pin, button or the like, having a solid gold shell.

I do not confine myself, however, to rolling the back plate over the front plate as this back plate may be operated in the reverse manner as illustrated in Fig. 9 which would be to form the hole 22, see Fig. S, a little larger leaving only a narrow rim and then pass the same down over the front plate and roll the edge 20 on the underside of the core or body portion, thus firmly binding the front plate in position.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. An article of jewelry comprising a stiifening or supporting middle member, joint and catch members connected to said supporting member, a front plate of ver-y thin material, and a third member rolled over the edges of said front and supporting members to secure the same together, and a pin-toiigue ada ted to be held by saidv joint and catch mem ers.

2. A new article of jewelry comprising a stiffening or supporting middle member, joint and catch members connected to said supporting member, a front plate of very thin material, a back plate having its edges rolled over that of the front plate whereby the whole is secured together, and a pin tongue ada ted to be held in said joint and catch mem ers. v

3. An article of jewelry comprisin a stiening or supporting middle mem er, joint and catch members 'formed integral with said supporting member, a front plate of very thin material, and a third member engaging the edges of said front plate and supporting member to secure the same together, and a pin-tongue ada ted to be held by said joint and catch mem ers.

4. A new article of jewelry comprising a stiflening or supporting middle member, joint and catch members formed inte ral with said supporting member, a front p ate of very thin material, a back plate having its edges rolled over that of the front plate whereby the whole is secured together, and a pin-tongue adapted to be held in said joint and catch members.

5. An article of jewelry comprising a stiffening or su porting core, joint and catch members attac ed to said core, a front plate of very thin material surrounded by an outwardly extending flange adapted to rest upon the face of said core, and a baclrplate4 of thicker material drawn u to receive said core and having its edge rol ed over the said flange of the front plate binding the same to the core whereby all of the members are secured together, and a pin-tongue pivoted in said joint member.

6. A pin, comprising a stifem'ng core, joint and catch members formed inte ral with said core, a front plate, a back p ate drawn up intoa cup-shape to receive said core and having its edge rolled over that of the front plate whereby the whole is secured together,`said back late 'being provided with apertures through) which said joint and catch members roject, and a pin-tongue adapted to be held in said members.

7. A in comprising a stiffening core, joint an catch members supported on -said core, a shell comprising a front plate, a back plate drawn up into a cup-shape to receive said core and having its edge rolled over that of the front plate whereby the whole is secured together, said back plate being provided with a ertures through which said joint and catcli members project, and a pintongue pivoted in said joint member the point of said pin being adapted to engage said catch member.

8. A in comprising a stiffening core, joint an catch members drawn up out of the stock of said core each into substantially a cup-shape, a shell comprisin a front late of very thin material, a back p ate of thicker material drawn up into a cup-shape to receive said core and having its edge rolled over that of the front plate whereby the whole is secured-together, said'back plate being provided with apertures through which said joint and catch members project, and a pin-tongue pivotedin said joint meniber, one wall of sa1d joint member forming a fulcrum therefor, the point of said in being adapted to engage said catch mem er.

9. A in comprising a stiening core, joint and) catch members supported on said core, a shell comprising a front plate of very thin material surrounded by an outwardly extending flange adapted to rest upon the front face of said core, a back plate'drawn up into substantially a cu -sha e to receive said core and having its e ge ro led over the flange of said front plate binding the same to the core whereby all the members are secured together, said back plate being provided' with a ertures through which said joint and catcli members project, and a pintongue pivoted in said joint member the point of said pin being adapted to engage said catch member.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

CHARLES H. GIFFORD.

Witnesses;

HOWARD E. BARLow, E. I. OGDEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2635311 *Oct 18, 1950Apr 21, 1953Schaffer Frances HButton fastener
US3033010 *Feb 23, 1960May 8, 1962Ralph PintarelliPierced earring having a wire loop pivotally journaled in the sides of a slot in the ring body
US4989352 *Feb 7, 1990Feb 5, 1991Tauno SeppanenBaseplate
US20090159185 *Dec 21, 2007Jun 25, 2009William Dudley CurrieTire building core segment manipulator apparatus and method
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA44C1/00