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Publication numberUS896504 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1908
Filing dateJan 16, 1908
Priority dateJan 16, 1908
Publication numberUS 896504 A, US 896504A, US-A-896504, US896504 A, US896504A
InventorsWilliam H Adams
Original AssigneeEastern Finishing Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for striping fabric.
US 896504 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 896,504. PATENTED AUG. 18, 1908.

- w. H. ADAMS.

APPARATUS FOR STRIPING FABRIC.

APPLIOATION FILED JAn.1e,19os.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

No. 896,504. PATENTED AUG. 18, 1908. W. H. ADAMS.

APPARATUS FOR STRIPING FABRIG.

APPLIOATION FILED N.16 190s.

JA z SHEETS-SHEET 2.

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WILLIAM H. ADAMS, OF LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO EASTERN FINISHING WORKS, OF LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS, A PARTNERSHIP.

APPARATUS FOR STRIPIN G FABRIC.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented.Aug-. 18, 1908.

Application filed January 16, 1908 Serial No. 411,053.

Lawrence, county of Essex, State ofMassa' chusetts, have invented an Improvement in Apparatus for Striping Fabric, of Which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawing, is a specification, like letters on the drawing representing like arts. P This invention has for its objecttheproduction of novel apparatus for striping flexible fabric, such as textile material, paper, oil-cloth, so constructed and arranged that the striping material may be applied to the fabric in several colors or combinations of color at a singlepassage or operation.

The material is applied to thefabric in stripes of an exact and unvarying width and relation to each other, and I have so constructed the apparatus that the arrangement or pattern of the stripes can be readily altered and practically any desired arrangement and width of striped and unstriped portions of the fabric may be readily attained. w

The material to be applied in stripes to the fabric may be paint, varnish, stain, chemicals, starch colors, mordants, dyes, etc., as may be desired, and a plurality of stripes differing from'each other'in color or character can be applied simultaneously.

The various novel features of my invention will be fully. described in the subjoined specification andparticularly pointed out in the following claims.

Figure 1 is a, top plan view, centrally broken out, of a striping apparatus embodying one form of my present invention, the fabric being shown as passing through the apparatus Fig. 2 is a vertical section on the line 2 2 Fig. 1, looking toward the left, showing one of the end-closing membersor plates for the multi-chambered receptacle which contains the striping material; Fig. 3

- is a like section on the line 3 '3 Fig. 1,

showing in side elevation one of the multicellular striping members or elements composingthe receptacle. for the striping material; Fig. 4 is a side elevation of one of the separating members; Fig.5 is a sectional detail on the line 5 5 f, Fig. 3, looking toward the right, to more clearly illustrate thestructure of the striping member; Fig. 6 is a side elevation of a modified form of stri ing member; Fig. 7 is a transverse sectiona deterial, illustrating a modification whereby pressure.

The fabric to be treated is run from bales or previously wound rolls across suitablefabric-supports some of which are arranged to deliver striping material, as will be explained, and thence to suitable drying means, which may be of any part of my present invention.

Upon suitable side-frames 1 arranged in which the striping mechanism is located, the fabric F being shown in Fig. 3 as passing under the roll 3 and up over a'bar 4, then underand across the fabric-supports of the striping mechanism and up over the guideroll 2. The bar 4 has mounted upon it the hubs of upturned edge-guides 5, held in latscrews 6, the edge-guides acting upon the longitudinal edges of the fabric and directing ratus. In accordance wlth my lnventlon I have ing materlal, the receptacle bein preferab y composed of a series of' multi-celular memmetallic plates and assembled in close contact side by side. Some of the members have a passage leading from one of'the cells and terminating in an external fabric-suport or sustaining portion, while others havelank order members similar and of the same contour externally, so that they can be interchanged or reversed, as will be ex lained.

Upon each of the si e-frames 1 I erect an end-closin plate 7 having an u turned and substantia y circular head 8, ig. 2, proin 9 which communicates with'a opp-like in et 10, but as shown in Fig. 1 the i et 10 at one side of the apparatus is o posite the blank portion of the head Sat t e opposite side, as will be understood. r

. A cover-plate 11, Fig. 2 may be provided for-each of the inlets, to prevent the entrance of dust or other impurities. I The heads are centrally apertured to receive a tie-rod 12 desired character and form no portions instead of passages, but in t at the utility of the apparatus may be increased I prefer to make all of said A tail through the receptacle for striping ma the striping material may be delivered under parallelism I mount guide-rolls 2, 3, between erally ad usted position on the bar by setit accurately in its passage through the appadevised a built-up or sectional receptacle having a plurality ofchambers for the stri bers or'sectionsfconveniently made as flat vided with a substantially semi-circular openw extended through hubs 13 on the exterior of 1O chambered receptacle for striping material.

Each member, whether it be a striping member A, Fig. 3, or a separating member B, Fig. 4, is of the same external contour and is provided with openings or cells which regis- 15 'ter when the members are assembled. Referring to Figs. 1 and 3 the striping members A are made as afl at plate having a .body of mainly circular outline, with openings or, cells 17, 18 divided by a central, upright bar 19, Fig. 3, provided with an aper ture for the tie-rod 12, the lower part? of the body being shown as enlarged to form a fabric-support 20' convexed at its outer end at 21, with apassage or outlet 22 leading .from the cell 18 to the outer end or mouth of the support. .At opposite sides of the fabric-support 20 ears 23 are formed, apertured to receivethe tie-rods 15, the ears and w the fabric-support being symmetrical with relation to a vertical line through the divid ing bar or wall 19. That is, the striping member is reversible, and by reversing the osition of a member inthe assembled series its outlet passage 22 will be made to lead from one or the other of the two parallel and separated, elon ated chambers formed by the registering ce ls 17 and 18. Supposing that the fabric is to'be provided with green stripes G, Fig. 1, and red stripes R,

contained inone chamber and-the red coloring matter in the other chamber-.- Then all of the striping members which are to deliver green color to the fabric will be set as in Fig. 3, for instance, and the inlet .10 at the left, Fig. 1, will communicate, with that end of the chamber formed by the cells to the left of the bar or wall 19, Fig. 3, but those members which are to deliver. red color will be 5 reversed, so that the outlets will assume the dotted line position 22 Fi 3 In other words, such outlets will lead from the chamber formed by the re istering cells at the right of the wall 19, S110 chamber having the right hand inlet 10, Fig. 1, communicating therewith. The thickness of ,a. stri ing member may I be equal to that of the wi th of the stripe to be made thereby, as at'A Fig. 1, for the said members may be assembled side by side to make'a sin 1e stripe, three of such members Abeing SII gjether to form the left and green stripe. I ach of the narrow red stripes is shown as and that the green coloring matter is to be right hand green stri pe G', or a plurality of own 1n Fig. 1 as grouped to-.

produced bya single'one of the thinner members, such as'A, but it will be remembered that in position the green-striping members are set reversely from the red-striping members. It will be understood that in practice I prefer to make the outlet passage 22 from one to the other flat face of the striping member, as a slot in the plate A leading from a cell 18 to the outer end of the part 20.

When themembers are assembled together all of the fabric-supports or parts 20 will be in longitudinal alinement from one to the other end'of the receptacle, and at the lower side or bottom thereof, Figs. 1 and 3, so that the striping material will flow out by gravity 0 upon such portions of the fabric F as are drawn across the delivery mouths of the fabric supports'on the striping members. .The striping medium is introduced from time to time to the chambers through the cup or fun- 5 nel-like inlets 10, a suitable level being maintained in the chambers by renewing the contents as necessary. Interspersed among the striping members in predetermined order,

according to the character or arrangement of the striping, are anumber of separating or dividing members, one of which is shown separately at B, Fig. 4,"corresponding in contour to the members A, and having cells 25, 26 separated by a central wall 27 through which the tie-rod 12 passes. The lower portion of the member is made blank or unslotted at 28, but convexed at its end at 29, and perforated for the tie-rods 15, and it will be manifest that neither cell has any outlets One or more of the separating members are used between striping members, according to the width of the part of the fabric which is not to be treated with'the striping material.

In Fig. 1 I have shown quite a large num- "ber of the relatively thin members B assemf bled betweenthe two striping members for the red stripes R, and a single thicker member B separating the green-and red .stripe I producing members, but said striping. members could be as well separated by one or 'more intervening members B. When the members are assembled side by side it will be clear that 'by the multi-cellular structure a plurality of elongated, parallel and separated chambers will be formed, and that the side walls of the deliver passages or outlets 22 will be formed by t e blank portions 28 of the adjacent separating members. This is clearly shown .in Fig. 5, and by setting up the tie-rods the series of members are tightly clamped together'between the end-closing plates, forming a rigid, tight receptacle chambered for -the striping material.

A greatvariety of patterns or stripe ar rangements can be secured by IIlYxIIlVBIllFlQIl,

"for it will be clear that the combinations or orders in which the striping and separating members are arranged are of wide range. plurality of colors, or materials differing in striping materials of different characters may I be used, but if desired the apparatus can be used to stripe with a single color or material. Should the chambers have a surplus of striping material therein when a piece of fabric has been finished it is desirable to tempora rily stop allthe outlet passages while another length or piece is being attached, as by so do ing waste of striping medium is prevented. Under the convex ends of the parts 20, 28 of the striping and separating members I mount an elongated concaved stop 30 preferably faced with rubber 31 and lifted by springs 32 into forcible engagement with the under face of the fabric. Plungers 33 rigidly secured to the stop, at or near its ends, pass through the springs and slide in brackets 34, Fig. 2, se cured to the plates 7, guide-rods 35 on the stop also sliding in the brackets. Normally the springs will hold the rubber facing 31 in position to press the fabric tightly across the mouths of the outlets 22 and firmly against the adj acentends 29 of the parts 28 of the separating members, eflectually cuttingoif or stoppin any. delivery of striping material,

the fabric eing held taut across the delivery mouths at all times, whether at rest or when in motion. To retract the stop any suitable means may be employed, such as a toggle 36, 37 connected with the plungers, the j oint' o'f the toggle having a handle 38 attached there-- to and provided with alug 39, Fig. 2.

When the stop is to be rendered inoperative the handle 38 is pushed to the right,Fig. 2, to break the toggle .and draw down the plungers 33 compressing the springs 32, the lug 39 then catching against a fixed detent 40, as shown. To elevate the stop the handle is lifted to disengage the lug 39 from its detent and the springs 32 will operate immediately to lift the stop and close the mouths of the outlets.

I may make a multi-chambered recepta-i cle with more than two chambers, by slig tly changing the general sha e of the-members composing such receptac e, and in Fig. 3 I have shown a striping member C for a threechambered rec'e tacle, said member having three circular ce ls 41, 42, 43, and apertures are provided for tie-rods 44, shown in section.

A fabric-su port or extension 45 is shown, symmetrically located so that the several supports will aline whenthe members are assembled. The cell 41 is shown as connected by-an outlet passage or slot 41* with multi-cham the members having the outlet communi eating with a side cell are reversible, as will be obvious. The separating members will be tri-cellular, as shown in Fig. 6, but the other portion thereof will besolid, or unslotted, as in the member B shown in Fig. 4.

In the apparatus so far described the striping material is gravity fed, but if desired the feed may be under pressure. This can be readily arranged by turning the receptacle shown inFigs. 1 and 3 half way round, as in Fig. 7, with the fabric-supportmg tight y both ends of each of the chambers. Striping material would then be introduced under pressure to one chamber through a pipe 46, and to the'other chamber through a pipe 47, and as the fabric is drawn over the convex end 21' of the support the pressure will force the material upward and upon the under face of the fabric. When pressure is shut off the material at once settles back in I the chambers, so that nostop ing or closing means is required for the moutfis of the outlet passages.

My invention is not restricted to the precise construction and arrangement herein shown and described as the same may be modified in various particulars without dcparting from the spirit and scope of my invention as set forth in the appended claims. -Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. In apparatus for striping fabric,'. a

ered receptacle for striping material comprising a series of multi-cellular striping and separating members assembled. side by sidein predetermined order with their cells registering, each member. having a fabric support thereon, the support on each striping member having an outlet communicating with one of the cells of such mem ber, and a closure for each end of the series, each closure having an inlet communicating with one of the chambers of the receptacle, the several outlets delivering striping material to the fabric as itis drawn across the outer ends of the supports.

2. In apparatus for striping fabric, a multi-chambered receptacle for striping mas terial having closed ends and comprising a series of multi-c'ellular striping and separating members assembled side by side in ortions 2O uppermost, and closingforward to be striped, some of the supports elongated,

predetermined order with their cells registering, forming a plurality of separated chambers extending continuously from end to end of the receptacle, each striping mem-' ber having an outlet communicating with one of the cells of such member, and means to support the fabric as striping material is delivered thereto from the several'outlets.

In ap aratus for stri ing fabric, a multi-chamfiered receptacle or striping material having'closed ends and comprising a series of multi-cellular striping and separating members assembled side by side in predetermined order with their cells registering, forming a plurality of separated chambers extending continuously from end to end of thereceptacle, each striping member having a fabric support thereon provided with an outlet communicating with one of the cells of such member, the fabric to be striped resting against the outer ends of the supports as the several outlets deliver striping material to the fabric, and inlets to introduce striping material to the chambers of the receptacle.

4. In ap aratus for stri ing fabric, a mrilti-chamfiered receptacle or striping material comprising a series of interchangeable, multi-cellular members assembled side by side in a predetermined order with their cells registering and each having an external fabric-support, the outer ends of the supports sustaining the fabric as it is drawn having outlets communicating with one or another chamber of the receptacle, to deliver striping material therefrom to the fabric,1and means'to close the ends of the receptac e.

'5. In apparatus for stri ing fabric, a

multi-cham cred receptacle or striping material comprising a series of symmetrical, in terchangeable and reversible multi-cellular members clam ed side by side in desired arrangement with their cells registering and each having an external fabric-supporting portion in longitudinal alinement, the fabricsupporting portion of some of said members havin an outlet communicating with one of the es ls of its member, the reversal of position of such a member changing the chamber of the receptacle with which the outlet communicates.

6. In apparatus for striping fabrics, an

uilt-u receptacle having a plurality of separate chambers closed at their ends and adapted to contain striping material, the receptacle comprising multi-cellular members assembled side by side inpre'determined order with their cells registering to form the continuousochambersand external, convex-ended tubular fabric-supports on said assembled members, some of the sup-- ports communicating with one chamber of the receptacle and other supports commumulti-cellular members having paral clamp all of said parts rigidly together.

nicating 'with a different chamber, combined with manually-controlled means to press the fabric to be striped against the delivery ends of the tubular supports and stop simultaneously the delivery of striping 'material' therefrom.

7. In apparatus for striping fabric, a built-up receptacle for striping material comprising a series of separable multi-cellular stri ing and separating members assembled sir e by sidein predetermined order with their cells registering, to form'a plurality of continuous, distinct chambers extending the length of thereceptacle, means to close the ends of the chambers, and an inlet for each chamber, each striping member having an outlet communicating with one of its cells, to deliver to the fabric stri ing material from the corresponding chamber of the receptacle.

8. In apparatus for striping fabric, an elongated multi-chambered and built-up receptacle for striping material said receptacle comprising a series of multi-cellular members assembled side by side with their cells regis- 9O tering, said members having longitudinally alined and radially arranged extensions convexed at their outer ends to sustain the fabric to-be striped, some of the extensions havin cell outlets communicating with one chamber of the receptacle and other exten-' sions having cell outlets communicating with a difierent chamber, the lateral distance between adjacent outlets determining the width of the portions of'the fabric which are not to receive striping material.

9. In ap aratus for stri ing fabric, a multi-cham ered receptacle or striping material composed of a series of interchangeable,

cl op- 1 5 posite faces and provided with rod-receiving apertures, each member having an external fabric-supportin portion, some of said portions having out ets communicating with one or another chamber of the rece )tacle, end- 0 plates to close the chambers, eac plate having an inlet to one of the chambers, and tierods extended through the end-plates and the \intervening multi-cellular members to 10. In apparatus for striping fabric, a multi-chambered receptacle. for striping ma terial composed of a series of fiat, multi-cellular metallic members assembled face to face and each having an external fabric-support, the members varying in thickness and I being arranged in redetermined order, according to the widt and arrangement of the striping to be produced, some of the fabric supports having outlets communicating with 1 one chamber and other of the'supports having outlets communicating with a diflerent' chamber. v

11. A member for a built-up, multi-chambered receptacle for striping apparatus, com.

prising aosymmetricall sha ed, flat and multi-cellular open b0 y an an external fabric-supporting ortion. r

12. A member or a built-up, multi-chambered receptacle for striping apparatus, comprising a flat, annular body having an internal web dividing it into separated open cells,

passage therein communicating with one only of the cells.'

14. In apparatus for striping fabric, a plurality of adjacent, separated chambers to contain striping material, a series of longitu dinally alincd fabric-supports exterior to-the chambers, and dellverv passages in said supc'ontain stripin ports, each passage connecting the outer end of the support with one of the chambers.

15. In apparatus for striping fabric, a plurality of adjacent, separated chambers to material, a series of longitudinally alined fabric-supports exterior to the chambers, and delivery passages in said supports, each passage connecting the outer end of the support with one of the chambers, combinedwith uides in front of and behind the series offafiric-supports, to sustain the fabric as it is drawn forward across the ends of the said su ports, and adjustable edgeguidesfm the abric. 1

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

' WILLIAM H. ADAMS. Witnesses:

FREDERICK GRIFFIN,

GEO. M. LITTLEFIELD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2659343 *Dec 1, 1950Nov 17, 1953Gen Aniline & Film CorpCoating liquid applicator
US2703432 *Mar 1, 1950Mar 8, 1955Joseph A BatyApparatus for manufacture of battery plate separators
US2774327 *Jun 28, 1952Dec 18, 1956Barbier Saint-Hilaire AlbertApparatus for production of coated tape
US2833242 *Oct 18, 1954May 6, 1958Burroughs CorpNozzle for striping web materials
US3014454 *May 22, 1959Dec 26, 1961Kurt Smejda RichardStripe applicators
US3886898 *Dec 19, 1973Jun 3, 1975Burroughs CorpMultiple, contiguous stripe, extrusion coating apparatus
US3958532 *Jul 22, 1974May 25, 1976Polaroid CorporationCoating apparatus
US4133293 *Sep 23, 1977Jan 9, 1979Smejda Richard KLiquid feeding, patterning and blending system
US4356216 *Jan 21, 1981Oct 26, 1982Alcan Aluminum CorporationProcess for producing striped surface coatings
US4356217 *Jan 21, 1981Oct 26, 1982Alcan Aluminum CorporationProcess for producing striated surface coatings
US4411215 *Jun 11, 1982Oct 25, 1983Alcan Aluminum CorporationApparatus for producing striped surface coatings
US4517787 *Aug 17, 1982May 21, 1985Frito-Lay, Inc.Method and apparatus for sealing bags
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB05C9/06