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Publication numberUS906011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1908
Filing dateApr 3, 1905
Priority dateApr 3, 1905
Publication numberUS 906011 A, US 906011A, US-A-906011, US906011 A, US906011A
InventorsJohn E Greenawalt
Original AssigneeJohn E Greenawalt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Precipitating apparatus.
US 906011 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Dec. 8, 1908.

2 SHEETS-SHEET l.

J. E. GREENAWALT.

PRBGIPITATENG APPARATUS.

APPLIOATION FILED APR. 3. 1905.

UHHVHSIHY, ILLILUTHIUAL L WAVE ENERGY. 257

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J. EL GREENAWALT. PREGIPITATNG APIARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APB. 3, 1905.

Patented Dec. 8, 1908.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

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204. CHEMISTRY, ELECTRICAL & Vl/.AVE ENERGY.

JOHN E. GREENAWALT, OF DENVER, COLORADO.

PRECIPITATING APPARATUS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 8, 1908.

Application filed April 3, 1905. Serial N o. 253,622.

To all whom t may concern:

Be it known that I, JOHN E. GREENAWALT, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city and county of Denver and State of Colorado, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Precipitatin Apparatus; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters and figures of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

My invention relates to improvements in apparatus for precipitating metallic values from their solutions, being especially adapted for the precipitation of gold and silver from chlorin or other solutions but being more especially intended for use where chlorin is used in the leaching process for dissolving the metallic values.

The apparatus consists of one or more cells each of which is provided with a perforated diaphragm located in its lower portion upon which is placed a mass of lead shavings provided with a small proportion of zinc alloy, say from one-half of one per cent. to one per cent. In the upper part of each cell is suspended a porous jar containing the anode element of the electrolytic cell; the aforesaid mass of lead shavings with its alloy zinc, forming the cathode element. The positive wire of an electrical source is connected with the anode element; while the negative wire of the source is connected with the cathode element. As a convenience in connecting the negative conductor with the cathode element, a metal ring isplaced upon the perforated diaphragm beneath the lead shavings.

The solution containing the metal values to be precipitated, is introduced to the cell below the perforated diaphragm and caused to pass upwardly therethrough, through the mass of lead shavings and if desired out at the top into a conduit leading to the lower part of another cell through which the solu tion is passed. In this way the solution may be passed through any desired number of precipitating cells.

In carrying out the process in connection with this apparatus, the electric current is passed through the solution in the opposite direftion from the passage ofthe solution itsel Having briefly outlined my improved construction, I will proceed to describe the same in detail reference being made to the accompanying drawing in which is illustrated an embodiment thereof.

In this drawing, Figure l is a vertical longitudinal section taken through a number of cells connected in accordance with my invention. Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the same. Fig. 3 is a detail view of the perforated diaphragm or Hoor employed in connection with the cells. Fig. 4 is a detail view of a ring employed in connection with the cell.

The same reference characters indicate the same parts in all the views.

Let A, B, and O designate three precipitating cells which are connected in such a manner that the solution to be treated may be passed through the same in succession. In the lower part of each of these cells is placed a porous Hoor or diaphragm 2. Upon this floor is placed a mass of metal shavings 3 preferably lead shavings provided with an alloy of from one-half of one per cent. to one per cent. of zinc. This mass of metal shavings constitutes the cathode element of the electrolytic cell.

In the upper part of each cell is suspended a porous jar 8 by means of rods D which rest upon the tops of the cells as best illustrated in Fig. 2. Within each of these cells is placed an anode element 7 preferably composed of carbon. The positive wire 6 of an electrical source is connected with each anode element; while the negative wire 9 of the source is connected with the cathode element. In order to form proper contact with the wire 9, the metal ring forming an electrode is located on the perforated floor. The wire` 9 is directly connected with this ring in the manner best illustrated in Fig. 4, as by coiling the wire around the ring. The metal shavings being in direct contact with the ring, a good electrical connection is made between the wire and the cathode element. Each jar 8 is partially immersed in the solution of the cell when the latter is in use. Each jar also contains a quantity of liquid, to facilitate the passage of the electric current through the jar into the solution. Each jar is provided with ears 10 on opposite sides through which the rods D pass.

From the foregoing description the use and operation of my improved apparatus Eicon will be readily understood. The solution Gr from the leaching tank (not shown), is delivered to thc cell A by a conduit 1, the solution entering the cell below the perforated fioor 2. The source of supply with which the pipe 1 is connected, is located sufficiently above the cell A to cause the liquid to travel upwardly in the cell, the solution lirst passing through the perforated Hoor, and then upwardly through the metal shavings. If a number of cells is used in connection with each other, this liquid will overflow and pass out into a conduit 1a connected with the upper part of the cell. This last named conduit enters the cell B below the perforated floor and the solution passes upwardly through the cell B in the same manner as heretofore explained with reference to the cell A. The solution may be taken from the upper part of the cell B and delivered through a conduit 1, to a cell C, the liquid being` delivered below the perforated iioor in the same manner as in the other cells. In this way the liquid may be made to travel from the bottom of each cell upwardly, any desired number of cells being employed. The solution after passing through the last cell of the series, passes out of a conduit 1d and may be delivered to any desired location.

Simultaneously with the passage ofthe solution through the various cells from the bottom upwardly, the electric current en ters each cell by the positive wire 6 passing first through the anode element, thence through the porous jar, thence through the solution contained in the cell, to the cathode element and thence out through the negative wire 9 to the other pole of the source.

It is preferred to heat the solution to a temperature of one hundred and thirty degrees Fahrenheit or greater since the precipitation of the values is facilitated by this step. The process of precipitation, however, herein described, is not claimed in this application but by an application tiled April 3rd, 1905, Serial No. 253,621.

By virtue of the process heretofore eX- plained, the metallic values are precipitated as a black pulverulent slime consisting principally of lead, silver and gold which is readily melted into bullion and the metal separated. The lead is then also melted, a suitable amount of zinc added, and cut into shavings when it is again ready for use.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a precipitating apparatus, the combination of a cell having a perforated floor located therein and supported above the bottom thereof, a mass of shavings cut from an alloy of lead and zinc supported by the floor and forming a cathodeelement, a porous jar suspended from the top of the cell and projecting thereinto, the said jar being provided with an anode element, suitable electrical connections with the anode and cathode elements, and means for introducing the'solution to be treated into the cell below the perforated floor and forcing the solution upwardly through the said floor and through the metal shavings thereof -in a direction opposite the passage of the electrical current through the cell, substantially as described.

2. In a precipitating apparatus, the combination of a cell having a perforated floor located therein and supported above the bottom thereof, a mass of metal shavings cut from an alloy of VYlead/ arid ]inc supported by the floor and foriiiing a cathode element, an anode element suspended from the top and projecting into the electrolyte of the same, suitable electrical connections with the anode and cathode elements, and means for introducing a solution to be treated into the cell below the perforated floor and forcing the solution upwardly through the said iioor and through the metal shavings thereon in a direction opposite to that of the electric current through the cell, substantially as described.

3. In a precipitating apparatus, the combination of a cell provided with a perforated floor mounted above the bottom, a metallic sponge or mass of metallic shavings formed from an alloy of lead and Zinc mounted on `the perforated floor, a porous jar suspended from the top of the cell and projecting thereinto, means for passing the solution to be precipitated through the floor and metallic shavings or sponge, and means for passing an electric current through the porous jar into the solution and then into and among the metallic sponge, substantially as described.

4. In a precipitating apparatus, the combination of a cell provided with a perforated floor mounted above the bottom and dividing the cell into an upper and lower compartment, a metallic sponge or mass of metallic shavings mounted upon the perforated floor,and the same having been cut from an alloy of lead and Zinc, a porous jar suspended from the top of the cell and projecting thereinto, means for introducing a solution into the lower chamber and thence through the metallic sponge, and means for introducing an electrical current through the porous jar into the solution and then into and among the metallic sponge, the metallic sponge constituting the cathode of the arrangement.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

JOHN E. GBEENAVALT.

Vitnesses DENA NELSON,

. J. OBRIEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4964366 *Oct 27, 1988Oct 23, 1990Sharp Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for the production of photoconductive components for use in electrophotography
US5198083 *Jan 8, 1990Mar 30, 1993United Kingdom Atomic Energy AuthorityElectrochemical cell and method of treating waste material therewith
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationC25B9/20