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Publication numberUS906993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1908
Filing dateSep 30, 1907
Priority dateSep 30, 1907
Publication numberUS 906993 A, US 906993A, US-A-906993, US906993 A, US906993A
InventorsEddo V Bates, Robert B Robinson
Original AssigneeBates & Robinson Machine Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carding-machine.
US 906993 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. V. BATES & R. B. ROBINSON.

CARDIN G MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED arm-1230, 1907.

Patented Dec. 15, 1908.

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E. V. BATES 6: R. B. ROBINSON.

GABDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION TILED SBPT.3 0,1907.

906,993. Patented Dec, '15, 1908.

2 SHEETSSHEET 2.

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

EDDO V. BATES AND ROBERT B. ROBINSON, OF LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNORS TO BATES & ROBINSON MACHINE COMPANY, A CORPORATION.

CARDIN G-MACHINE To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that EDDo V. BATES, a citizen of the United States, and RO ERT B. ROBIN- SON, a citizen of Canada, both residing at Lowell, in the county of MiddleseX and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Oarding-rlachines, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention is upon machines for carding or straightening the fibers of wool, cotton, and other simllar stock, more particularly wool.

It lies the card 0 othing and in applying it to what are known as strippers and transfer rolls on carding machines.

Our urpose is to so make the card clothing an to so arrange the rolls that a stripper or transfer roll can be used as a stripper or transfer roll and as a worker at the same time. Its rincipal purpose is to permit a larger num er of workers and therefore a larger number of carding points upon the Same main cylinder. By its use, we produce a better and stronger sliver and one in which the fibers are straighter than is usual. By our invention, one card will do the work of two or three and the resulting yarn is smoother and has fewer specks.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a diagrammatic side view of a card including the main cylinder, the workers, combination strippers and workers, fancy, and doffer. Fig. 2 shows in detail a single worker with our stripperworker in connection with the main cylinder and also shows the course of the different webs, part of one web being broken to show the teeth. Fig. 3 is a magnified side view of a strip of card clothing made according to our invention. Figs. 4, 5 and 6 show different forms of staples. Figs. 7 and 8 show different arrangements of the teeth of the card clothing. Fig. 9 shows in perspective an arrangement of teeth wherein a plurality of rows of straight teeth alternate with a plu-' rality of rows of bent teeth. Fig. 10 shows a similar construction with adjoining single rows of straight teeth and bent teeth. Fig. 11 shows a worker, and a stripper provided with teeth of different pitches in the reversed position from that shown in Fig. 2 and also shows the web partly broken to show the teeth. Fig. 12 shows a pair of workers between which is a connecting stripper-worker Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed September 30, 1907.

rincipally in the construction of.

Patented Dec. 15, 1908. Serial No. 395,170.

which acts as a transfer roll, and a stripper in front of the first worker.

It is well-known, in the art of carding, that where two rolls covered with card clothing travel with their points in close proximity to each other and where one or the other or both carries a web, by difierent arrangements of the teeth of the card clothing, dif ferent results are produced. In one case,

carding or straightening of the fibers will occur; in another case one roll will strip the fiber from the teeth of the other roll; and in still another case, the fiber will be brushed off and rolled up between the two.

The ordinary card clothing has teeth which are bent towards their points at an angle with the radial lines of the cylinder to which they are attached. When clothing with such teeth is run point to point, as a rule, carding will take p ace. On the other hand, if the teeth are set with their points in the same direction and the cylinders run at different Speeds towards the points of the card clothing teeth, the cylinder with the faster surface speed will strip or brush the web from the other. Numerous other combinations are familiar to carders.

In the common form of cards, the main cylinder travels at a very high surface speed, as say one thousand feet a minute, and it is surrounded by a plurality of'slow running workers whose teeth are point to oint with those on the main cylinder. T 1e surface speed of the workers is say sixteen feet a minute. In front of each worker is a stripper which cleans the stock from the worker and is itself cleaned or stripped by the main cylinder. In such case the card clothing is attached to the stripper in the opposite way from the workers and the main cylinder. Thereby the teeth of the stripper point in the same direction with those on the worker and on the main cylinder and are not point to point therewith. The surface speed of the stripper is say two hundred and fifty feet a minute. No carding takes place between the strippers and the main cylinder in such case, but the carding all takes place between the workers and the main cylinder.

We make our card clothing as shown in Fig. 3 with certain rows or sets of bent teeth M, M of the ordinary construction. These teeth start backward at a reverse angle from the foundation N of the card clothing to form a leg 31 and are bent to pitch forward to form a leg 32. Thereby a sort of hook is formed, the point of which is preferably in advance of its base. The other teeth 0 O which are straight pitch backwards substantially in the same direction with leg 31. Preferably leg 32 of teeth M should pitch or slant forward from a perpendicular line through foundation N which is substantially coincident with a radial line of the roll to which the card clothing is attached, when it is in place. Straight teeth 0, on the other hand, preferably pitch backwards from such line. The rows of straight teeth 0 and of bent teeth M may be arranged singly as shown in Fig. 10 or a plurality of rows of straight teeth can alternate with a lurality of rows of bent teeth as shown in 1g. 9.

The card clothing may be made of staples with two bent legs 40, as shown in Fig. 4, which alternate in different combinations with staples having two straight legs 41 such as shown in Fig. 6, or staples may be used such as shown in Fig. 5 with one straight leg 41 and one bent leg 40. Vith clothing so made, there will be more or less flexibility or give to the teeth.

We do not confine ourselves to the exact degree of itch for the teeth shown in Fig. 3, as the ang es between the legs of the straight and the legs of the bent teeth M and 0 may be varied as shown in Fig. 7, and in fact the straight teeth may stand at right angles to the foundation N as shown in Fig. 8.

Such card clothing as described is the subject of a separate application ending herewith, said application being a c ivision of this application.

in the drawings, A is the main cylinder in every case, B, B are workers, C, C are combination stripper-workers, D is the fancy and E is the doifer.

Our preferred form of card is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Main cylinder A travels forward with its teeth pointing forward, workers B, B travel backward with their teeth pointing forward. Carding takes place between the workers and main cylinder and a certain amount of web 41 is carried over and back by workers B, B all in the usual manner. Instead of the ordinary stripper however, we cover the stri per roll with our combination toothed car clothing and attain very much better results.

We attach our card clothing to the roll which is to be used as stripper-worker C with the points of the bent teeth M M point to point with those on the main cylinder A and those on the worker B. The workers B, B travel in the opposite direction from the main cylinder A at a much slower speed and their teeth are point to point with those on the main cylinder. Stripper-workers C, C travel in the same direction as workers B, B at a much greater speed but at a considerably less speed than the main cylinder A.

For example, if thesurface speed of the main cylinder is one thousand feet a minute, the surface speed of the workers will be sixteen feet a minute and of the stripper-workers two hundred and fifty feet a minute. This arrangement brings the straight teeth 0, O in a proper stripping relationship with the teeth on the workers B, B.

It will be readily seen that a carding takes place between the bent teeth M, M, of stripper workers 0 and the teeth of the main cylinder A. The straight teeth 0, O, on the other hand, have suffioient'slant to effectively strip the Web 41 from worker B carry ing it over and back until it again reaches the point of contact with the main cylinder A. Such stripping would take place to some extent without straight teeth 0, 0, but it would be a brushing or tearing off of flakes and would not be as smooth and perfect. As stripper-worker Ctravels at a much higher surface speed than worker B, it will be readily seen that the web 41 will be attenuated thereby and that it will be brought in carding contact with the teeth of the main cylinder A more frequently than if stripper-worker C traveled at a slower speed.

A certain amount of thin web 42 is'picked up from main cylinder A and is retained on the bent teeth and on the straight teeth of stri per-worker C and this is carried around anc merged with web 41 until properly carded. The result of using the straight teeth 0, O on stripper-worker C is that they strip in a clean and efficient manner the web 41 which is carried over and back by Worker B, thus leaving the teeth of worker B clean and in good condition to card with the main cylinder. Moreover, straight teeth 0, 0, also hold firmly the thin web 42 which is carried up and back by stripper-worker O. For the last named reason, the web 42 is not ruffed up by the teeth of worker B, and is not torn off and rolled up thereby making uneven work as is the case where the straight teeth are not used. We find that the thin web 42 is formed on stripper-worker C and is held firmly there but that any excess of stock is carded or is carried forward by the main cylinder A. We find also that the web on stripper-worker C and on other similar rolls upon which our card clothing is used does not sink into the teeth, but is carried firmly by the points thereof. We account for this by the fact that the teeth cross each other near their oints and thus hold the stock well up. We nd also that the constant brushing which the web 42 on stripper-worker 0 gets from the smooth backs of the teeth on worker B cleans all grease, very short stock and other dirt from it, thus improving its condition. This kee s stripper-worker C at all times clean an free. We thus, instead of one carding point, between the worker and main cylinder, get two that is we get an extra carding oint between stripper-worker C and main cy inder A, and we thus utilize the space ordinarily occupied by the strippers. The size of the stripper-worker C is not material, as it may be larger or smaller than shown herein. It is better to have it of somewhat less diameter than the worker which it strips however.

While we prefer the arrangement of rolls shown in Fig. 2, we find that it is a decided advantage over ordinary methods to use our card clothing on the ordinary stripper F with its teeth set in the direction opposite to that shown in Fig. 2. This arrangement with one worker and stripper is shown in Fig. 11. In such case the worker B is stripped of web 43 by the bent teeth of stripper-Worker F in the ordinary way. We find however, that by using the interspersed straight teeth, the stock is not taken off of stripper F by main cylinder A in flakes but is carried along in a smooth regular web.

Another arrangement which we can use is to arrange the workers in pairs around the main cylinder. One such pair is shown in Fig. 12. In this arrangement, we have a forward running worker S, a backward running worker T, a combination stripperworker or transfer roll U between them with its bent teeth arranged to card with the main cylinder and alsowith worker S, and an ordinary stripper R provided with bent teeth only which are set to stri worker S and not to card with the main cy inder. rangement, transfer roll U acts with reference to worker T and main cylinder A, in a way similar to stripper-worker C in the c0nstruction shown in Fig. 2. It cards with main cylinder A and strips worker T.

Transfer roll U travels backwards and at the same or a somewhat greater surface speed than backward running worker T, say eight feet a minute. It cards with main cylinder A and also with forward running worker S. It picks up a thin web 45 from main cylinder A and strips from worker T the Web 46 which that worker has picked up from main cylinder A. As stripper-worker U travels at about the same surface speed as worker T, web 46 is not attenuated until it reaches the running worker S travels at a higher surface speed than transfer roll U, as say sixteen feet I a minute and cards with it. It also strips webs 45 and 46 therefrom and merges them into web 47. Web 47 is recarded by main cylinder A and what remains thereof to-' gether with the thin web 48 picked up from the main cylinder is carried back. All the web on worker S is stri ped therefrom by ordinary stripper R whic travels at a much higher surface speed than worker S, as say two hundred and fifty feet a minute, but less than main cylinder It will be noted that on account of the rel- In this aratively slow drawing apart of adjoining points on worker S and transfer roll U as they revolve and the fact that the teeth of worker S are kept clear of stock by fast runnin stripper R, practically all the stock inclu ing webs 45 and 46 are stripped from transfer roll U and its teeth are left clear to card with main cylinder A. In this arrangement we get four carding points out of a pair of workers, a transfer roll and a stripper. That is carding takes lace between S and A, S and U, U and A, an T and A. It is useful for some kinds of stock.

Other arrangements of rolls provided with our improved card clothing will suggest themselves to those familiar with the art of carding, where it is desirable for a roll to card and, at the same time, to strip another roll.

Our principal invention resides in providing card clothing wherein the teeth pitch in different or opposite directions and in applying it to the rolls of a carding machine.

What we claim as our invention and desire to cover by Letters Patent is,

1. In a carding machine, a roll covered with card clothing'in which different teeth pitch in difierent directions, said teeth being arranged around the periphery of the roll in the same or parallel planes which planes are perpendicular to the'axis of the roll.

2. In a carding machine, a stripper which is covered with card clothing of which the teeth pitch in different directions, said teeth being arranged around the periphery of the stripper in the same or parallel planes which planes are perpendicular to the axis of the stripper.

3. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder, and a stripper which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing the teeth of which pitch in different directions said teeth being arranged around the periphery of the roll in the same or parallel planes which planes are perpendicular to the axis of the roll.

4. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder, and a stripper-worker which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing the teeth of which pitch in different directions.

5. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including two workers each of which engages the main cylinder, a transfer roll between said workers and the main cylinder which engages both workers and the main cylinder and is covered with card clothing the teeth of which pitch in different substantially radial directions whereby stock is transferred from the second to the first worker, and a stripper for taking stock from the first worker and replacing it upon the main cylinder.

6. In a carding machine, a roll provided with flexible teeth so set that different teeth pitch in different directions in the same or parallel planes which planes are perpendicuar to the axis of the roll.

7. In a carding machine, a roll covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and wire legs forming teeth which pitch in one direction and are interspersed with other wire legs which pitch in a different direction.

8. In a carding machine, a roll covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and flexible teeth which pitch in one direction interspersed with other flexible teeth which pitch in a different direction.

9. In a carding machine, a roll covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and bent teeth which pitch in one direction interspersed with straight teeth which pitch in a different direction.

10. In a carding machine, a roll covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of other teeth which itch in a different direction.

11. n a carding machine, a roll covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of bent teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of straight teeth which pitch in a different direction.

12. In a carding machine, a' stripper provided with flexible teeth so set that different teeth pitch in diflerent directions in the same or parallel planes which planes are perpendicular to the axis of the stripper.

13. In a carding machine, a stripper covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and wire legs forming teeth which pitch in one direction and are interspersed with other wire legs which pitch in a different direction.

14. In a carding machine, a stripper covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and flexible teeth which pitch in one direction interspersed with other flexible teeth which pitch in a different direction.

15. In a carding machine, a stripper covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and bent teeth which pitch in one direction interspersed with straight teeth which itch in a different direction. 4

16. n a carding machine, a stripper covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of other teeth which pitch in a different direction.

17. In a carding machine, a stripper covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of bent teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of straight teeth which pitch in a different direction.

18. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder, and a stri per which engages the main cylinder and tiie worker and is provided with flexible teeth so set that different teeth pitch in different radial directions.

19. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder and a roll which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and wire legs forming teethwhichpitch in one direction and are interspersed with other wire legs which pitch in a different direction.

20. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder and a roll which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and flexible teeth which pitch in one direction interspersed with other flexible teeth which pitch in a different direction.

21. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder and a roll which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and bent teeth which pitch in one direction interspersed with straight teeth which pitch in a different direction.

22. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder and a roll which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of teeth which pitch in a diflerent direction.

23. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls 00- operating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder and a roll which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of bent teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of straight teeth which pitch in a different direction.

24.. In a carding machine, a main cylinder combined with a plurality of sets of rolls cooperating therewith, each set including a worker which engages the main cylinder and a roll which engages the main cylinder and the worker and is covered with card clothing which comprises a foundation and rows of bent teeth which pitch in one direction and alternate rows of straight teeth which pitch in a diiferent direction in substantially radial parallel planes.

25. In a carding machine, a main cylinder which rotates forward and is covered with card clothing the teeth of which are bent forward, a plurality of workers cooperating therewith each of which rotates backwards and is covered with card clothing the teeth of which are bent forward, a plurality of strinper-workers each of which is placed behind a worker and cooperates therewith and with 15 the main cylinder and is covered with card clothing part of the teeth of which are bent forward and are interspersed with straight teeth which pitch backward.

In testimony whereof we aifix our signa 20 tures in presence of two witnesses.

EDDO V. BATES. ROBERT B. ROBINSON. Witnesses:

M. D. LAKE, FLORENCE A. PARR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2721360 *Feb 24, 1951Oct 25, 1955Rosalie Vranckx-DerooverMethod and device for treating kapok or the like preparatory to spinning
US4090276 *Jul 19, 1976May 23, 1978Glen Walton Company LimitedTextile carding
US4408370 *May 21, 1982Oct 11, 1983Mayer, Rothkopf Industries, Inc.Short fiber feed system for sliver high pile fabric knitting machines
US4408371 *Aug 24, 1981Oct 11, 1983Mayer, Rothkopf Industries, Inc.Self-cleaning doffer wire
US4854012 *Mar 28, 1988Aug 8, 1989Graf & Cie AgSaw tooth wire of a saw tooth-card clothing for a textile machine producing randomly oriented fibre fleeces
US5755012 *Mar 3, 1997May 26, 1998Hollingsworth; John D.Metallic clothing for carding segments and flats
US5898978 *May 26, 1998May 4, 1999John D. Hollingsworth On Wheels, Inc.Metallic clothing for carding segments and flats
US6185789May 4, 1999Feb 13, 2001John D. Hollingsworth On Wheels, Inc.Metallic clothing for carding elements
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD01G15/04