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Publication numberUS907973 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1908
Filing dateJan 8, 1908
Priority dateJan 8, 1908
Publication numberUS 907973 A, US 907973A, US-A-907973, US907973 A, US907973A
InventorsEdwin P Crocker
Original AssigneePayne Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stereoscope.
US 907973 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. P. GROGKER & A B PAYNE. v

STEREOSGOPE.

APPLICATION FILED JAILB, 190a.

Patented Dec. 29, 1908.

6 SHEETS SHEET 1.

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A B Payne by Aht'y's.

E. P. GROGKER & A B PAYNE.

STEEEOSGOPE.

APPLICATION FILED 1 8. 190s.

Patented Dec.29,1908.

Witnesses c1 m 2 A F If; nm M 6 6 Vmn msw PP m M M E U,

E. P. GRQGKER & A B PAYNE.

STEREOSGOPB.

APPLIGATION FILED JAN.8, 1908.

Patented Dec. 29, 1908.

6 SHEETS-SHBET 4.

Inventors:

\A Edwin P. Cn'ooke? A. B Payne.

Wibnesse w O... .?m @& 2.3M

E. P. OROGKER & A B PAYNE.

STEBEOSGOPE. APPLICATION H1511) JA1.8, 1908.

Patented Dec. 29, 1908.

- 6 SHEETS-SHEET 5.

. Inventors:

Edwin P. Brooke? b, A B Pane a H Mugs,

UNITED STATES PAT NT OFFICE.

. EDWIN P. GROCKER, OF ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, AND B PAYNE, OF WEBSTER GROVES, MISSOURI; SAID CROCKER ASSIGNOR TO SAID PAYNE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 29 1908.

To all whom it may concern.-

- and A B PAYNE, bothcitizens of the United States, residing. at Rochester, NewYork, and" Webster-Groves, Missouri, respectively, have invented a certain new. and useful lm rovement in Stereoscopes, of which. the f0 owingis a full and exact description, such as will en-:

line 33 of Fig. 4 ;Fig. 4 is a rear elevation ofthe lens-holder with the rear wall of same-removed for the urpose of clearly illustrating the positions 0 the reflecting mirrors; Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the ictureholder; Fig. 6 shows aportion of one osm of picture strip that can be vused in our stereoscope;

Fig. 7' is a sectional 'view of a modified form of our invention; Fig. 8 is a top plan view, partly in section, of the stereoscopeshown in ig. 7; Fig.- 9 is a perspective view of the icture-holdef used with said stereoscope; Fig. 10 is a diagrammatic view showing one way in which the reflecting mirrors can be arranged; Fig. 11 is a diagrammatic view show- -prisms used inplace of. the reflecting mirrors; and Fig. 12 shows a slightl different form of picture strip from that s own: in

Fig 6.

his invention; relates to stereoscopes. The main object of our invention is to pro-j vide an inex ensive and light-weight optical .device whic is so .constructed that it will displace pict ures or'images located indifferexit horizontal planes or different vertical and horizontal planes, into apparent optical coincidence. i

' 1 Another object of our invention is to'provide'astereosco e' which increase. the stereoscopic fiel of vislon'from approxi:

matel threeinches upto or over five inches and thus permit picture units of over three inches i width to'be viewed through the invention is to provide a simple and compact device or holder for handling and protecting the pictures or views that are to be examined through the stereoscope, said holder bein preferably constructed'to represent a boo and provided with a chamber for receiving a pamphlet or description of the views or pictures in the holder.

The pictures thatare used with the stereoscope herein shown differ from the ordinary stereosco e picture in that each picture is compose of two substantially identical planes and either in the same dr different vertical planes as hereinafter described. Preferably, said picture units are arranged on a continuous strip or a plurality of arallel continuous strips that are cause to move transversely across the,lenses of the stereoscope. And still another object of our 7 picture units arranged in different "horizontal' I stereoscope so as to produce a panoramic effeet. The stereoscope can be used, however, with a stantially identical picture-urfits'arran ed in different horizontal planes ona card t at is amined.

.- Referring to Fi s. 1 to 5 of the drawings which illustrate tie-preferred form of our present,invention, 1 designates a hollow held stationary when the picture is being exmember having ordinary stereosco ic lenses 2 arranged in its front wall 3. -A 00d 4 is also connected to saidfront wall and we prefer to detachably secure said hood m posi- -tion as, for example, by providing it with a dove-tailed rib 5 that cooperates with a dove-tailed groove in the front wall of the member 1, as shown in Fig. '1, so that the hood can be detached when the stereoscope is to be packed in its case. It s lmmaterlal, however, so faras our broad idea 1s concerned, how thehood is retained in position, and if desired, it could be permanently connected to the member 1. The member 1 is provided on" its lower side with flanges or guides 6 that cooperate with guides or tracks on the device which su ports said member. The st'ri or film onw' ch the pictures are mounte is arranged inside of a book-sha ed holder Aprovided with a hinged wal 1 or picture consisting of two subcover 7 that'can-be moved or-dropped into the position shown in Figs. 2 and '5 to form a support forthe lensholder 1,,said wall being smaller than the mirror 13.

provided with tracks or guides ,8 that are engaged by the guides (ion the member 1 so as to enable said member to be moved toward and away from the picture-holder.

In Fig. 6 we have shown a portion of one form of picture strip that can be used with our stereoscope, the pictures on said strip being each composed of two picture units X and X arranged in different horizontal planes and in the same vertical planes. We wish to have it clearly understood, however, that our improved stereoscope is not limited in its use to a continuous picture strip or to a picture in which the two picture units are arranged in the same vertical plane as said picture units could be arranged in different vertical planes orpartly in the same vertical plane and partly in different vertical planes as, for example, by having one picture unit overlap or extend over the other picture unit. The strip 9 which contains the picture units and which we will hereinafter refer to as the picture stri is wound upon two vertically disposed rolis 10 and 11 mounted in the holder A, as shown in Figs. 1 and 5, said holder being provided with a guide or su port 12 over which the picture strip trave s.

The "nember 1 in which the lenses are mounted is provided with a pair of parallel reflecting mirrors for each lens, said mirrors being so disposed that both picture units of each picture will appear to be in the same horizontal plane. As shown in Fig. 3, the pair of mirrors 13 and 13 that'are arranged in frontof the right lens are inclined upwardly relatively to said lens, and the pair of mirrors 14 and 14 that are arranged in front of the left lens are inclineddownwardly relatively to said left lens.- Consequently, the image of the upper picture unit X on the picture strip will be reflected onto the mirror 13 and then onto the mirror 13 which is located alinement with the right lens and the image of the lower picture unit X will be reflected onto the mirror 14' and then onto the mirror 14 which is located in-alinement with the left lens so that both picture units on the picture strip will appear to be in the same iorizontal plane. The pair of parallel mirrors 13 and 13 for the right lensin addition to being inclined upwardly, are also arranged at an angle oblique to a longitudinal vertical plane, as shown in Fig. 3, so that the path of light from the upper picture unit- X will be swerved downwardly and also to the right so as to throw the image of the upper picture unit onto 1 the mirror 13 which is The inclined mirrors 1 4 and 14 for the left lens are also arranged at an angle oblique to a longitudi-- nal vertical plane but at an opposite angle to that in which the mirrors 13 and 13 are arranged so that the path of light from the lower; picture unit X will be swerved upwardly and to the left to throw the image of would see the upper picture unit.

the lower picture unit X onto the mirror 14, as indicated by the arrows in Figs. 1 and 2. The advantage of arranging the reflecting mirrors in this manner is that we are able to use pictures in which. the upper and lower picture units overlap or lie in the same vertical plane for the field of vision of each lens is approximately five inches instead of three inches as in the stereoscopes heretofore in use, the reflecting mirrors 13 and 14: extending approximately the full width of the lens-holder 1. Instead of arranging the re fleeting mirrors as herein shown they could be so arranged that the right eye of the person looking through the stereoscope would see the lower picture unit and the left eye The rolls 10 and 11 are provided at their upper ends with "finger-pieces by which said rolls can be turned so as to cause the picture strip to pass through the visual plane and thus produce a perfect panoramic effect, the picture strip either being provided with one long continuous picture or a plurality of individual pictures with no blank spaces between the picture units. While we prefer to have the two picture units of each picture mounted on a single strip or film it will, of course, be understood that two parallel strips each containing one picture unit of the picture, could wall 15 having openings which are covered by pieces of glass 16 so as to prevent dust and dirt from getting on the reflecting mirrors for the lens. Said reflecting mirrors may be secured in position by any suitable means as, for example, by blocks 17, as shown in Fig. 1, and the inside of the member 1 is blackened.

The picture-holder A which forms one of the novel features of our invention, is shown in detail in Fig. 5, said holder being preferably constructed to represent a boo; and having one hinged cover or wall 7, as previously described, which forms a support for the lens-holder 1, and a hinged wall or cover 7 that forms a closure for a chamber 18 which is adapted to hold a pamphlet or description of the pictures on the picture strip, said chamber being located between two chambers 18 in which the icture strip rolls 10 and 11 are arrange as shown in Fig. 1. The cover or wall 7 is retained in its open or dropped position, as shown in Fig. 5, by any suitable means as, for example, by slotted links 19 connected to the cover and receiving pins 20 on the end walls of the member A, and the cover 7 is also rovided with a hinged section 21 that can e dropped into the position shown in Fig. 5 so as to provide a clearance for the lower portion of the face of the person who uses the stereoscope when the lens-holder 1 is adjusted up close to the picture-holder A.

. units are arranged on planes, as shown in Fig. 12.

Referring to Fig. 7, l 'designates a member having ordinary stereoscopic lenses 2*" mounted therein, and 3 is a hood secured to said member. The .picture strip 4* which is' similar to the picture strip shown 'in'Fig. 6

except that \the picture units Y and Y of each picture are arranged in differentvertical lanes, is wound on the rolls 5 of the picture older A that is adjustably mounted on a base or sup ort 6 pro'ecting forwardly from the lens-ho der 1. he front wall of the picture-holder A is provided with o enings 7 a and. 8 to expose the upper an lower icture units of each picture, the opening l7 eing'located o posite the left lens and m a lowerhorizonta plane than the opening. 8 which is located 0 posite the right lens. The lenses 2 are so lbcated relatively to the picture strip that. their transverse centers are on a line w1th thecenter of said strip. A re-.

flecting face,vpreferably a mirror 9, is arranged in front of the right lens, said mirror being inclined u wardly from the upper edge of the lens so tli I deflected in a straight line from the u per picture unit onto said mirror. A secon reecting surface or mirror 10 inclines upwardly from the lower'edge offtheright lens parallel to the mirror 9. so that the image of the picture unit shown on the mirror 9 will be reflected onto the mirror 10* .and thus come within the vision of the right eye of the person looking through the stereoscoper v A pair of parallel reflecting faces or mirrors 9 and 10 are arranged'in front of the left arranging the reflectlng lens, as shownin dotted lines in Fig. 7, butthe mirrors for the left'lens are dis osed ope positely to the mirrors for the rig it lens so 7 that the rays of light will be deflected in a di-- rect line from the lower picture units of theplcture strip onto the mirror 9 and thence:

onto the Imrror 10 so as to come within the vision-of the left eye of the person looking through the stereoscope, thereby bringing both units into apparent optical coincidence and producing-a single picture. Instead of irrors between the picture stri and the len es, said mirrors can e arrange between the eyes of thepers'on stereoscope, as shown in Fig. 10. I

looking atthepicture and the lenses of the While we prefer to use parallel mirrors, as

shown in Fig. 7, we do not wish to be underat the rays oflight will be tom Walls12 and 13, end walls 14*, and a rear wall, the bottom wallbeing constructed to represent a book-back and having two I hinged covers 15 and 16 connected thereto. The rear wall does not extend in a straight line from end wall to end wallbut is of irreg ular shape, as shown in Fig. 8, so that a chamber 17 a will be provided for receiving a pamphlet or description of the views on the picture strip, the cover 16 forming a lid or closure for this chamber 17, The portions 18 of the rearwall extend parallel to the end walls 14* andformtwo chambers in which the winding shafts 5 are disposed, and the portion 19 of the rear wall extends parallel to the front wall'so as to form a guidewayfor the picture strip which passes over vertlcally. disposed guide rods 20 arranged adjacenlt the outer side'edges of the. openings 7 a an 8..

While we have herein illustrated two forms of icture-holders we do not wish it to be is limited to these exact'constructions as our broad idea consists in a holder resembling a book and prdvided with achamber or. space to hold the descriptive matter which accompanies the 16 is provi ed with-a snap or attaching de-. vice 21 a that retains said cover in closed pofront wall 11* and in the back cover 16 to receive the base piece 6 which supports the pictuie -holder, the holder being provided with a piece 23 that bears upon the basethe picture-holdercan be placed in a bookun erstood that this feature ofour invention sition, and openings 22 are formed in the piece 6. When the stereoscopeis not in'use V case and when'it is desired -to examine the proper distance from thelenses. The windmg shafts 5 are journaled in the piece23 and in the top wall 12 and are provided at their upper endswith ,knurled .knobs' 24 which the operator turns tocause the picture strip to travel past the lenses and-thus roduce a panorama; The frontwall 11 o the holder ls'also hinged so thatit can-be swung open to permit'the picture. strip.- to-be at--' tached to the windin shafts.

' Having thus descri ed our invention, what 1 stereoscope adapted to holda picture comprising picture units that arearranged in we claim as new and desire tosecure'by Letters Patent isf 4 100 icture strip. .The back cover into apparent optical coincidence; su

different horizontal planes, and provided with reflecting surfaces Which are so arranged that they will displace said picture units into apparent optical coincidence; substantially as described.

2. A stereoscope provided with means for supporting a picture comprising images or picture units located in different horizontal planes, lenses, and reflecting surfaces so arranged relatively to the lenses that they will displace the images or picture units of said picture intr apparent optical coincidence; substantially as described.

3. A stereoscope provided with lenses, a picturev comprising picture units that are arranged in different horizontal planes, and reflecting surfaces for displacing said picture units into apparent optical coincidence; substantially as described.

4. A stereoscope rovidedwith means for holding a picture t at comprises a pair of picture units arranged in different horizontal planes, said stereoscope being provided with inclined reflecting surfaces which cause both picture units to appear to be in optical coincidence; substantially as described.

5. A stereoscope IOTldQd with lenses, and a pair of parallel re ecting surfaces cooperating with each lens for displacing images or pictures located in different horizontal lanes into apparent optical coincidence; su stantially as described.

6. A stereoscope provided with lenses, an inclined reflecting surface cooperating with one lens and an oppositely inclined reflecting surface cooperating with the other lens so as to displace pictures or images located in different horizontal planes into apparent optical coincidence; substantially as described.

7. A stereosco e provided with lenses, and a pair of parallel inclined reflecting surfaces 006 erating with each lens, the reflecting sur'aces for one lens being inclined oppositely to the reflecting surfaces'for the other lens so that pictures or images located in different horizontal planes will be displaced stantially-as' described.

'8. A stereoscope provided with a icture that is composed of two icture units ocated in diflerent horizontal planes, and two pairs of reflecting surfaces arranged in front of the picture and so disposed relatively thereto that both picture units will appear to lie in the same horizontal plane; substantiallyas described. I

9. A stereoscope provided with lenses and inclined reflecting-surfaces which are so arranged relatively to said lenses'that they will displace pictures or images located in different horizontal planes and in the same vertical plane into apparent o tical coincidence; substantially as descri ed. Y

10. A stereoscope adapted to be used with a picture comprising picture units that are arranged in different horizontal planes and partly in the same vertical lane, said stereoscope being providedwit lenses and inclined reflecting surfaces arranged at an angle oblique both to a longitudinal horizontal and to a longitudinal vertical plane so that the stereoscopic field of vision will be greater than the distance between the centers of said lenses; substantially as described.

11. A stereoscope provided with a picture composed of a pair of picture units arranged in different horizontal planes, lenses, and means for causing both units of the picture to appear to lie in the same horizontal plane; substantially as described.

12. A stereoscope provided with lenses, and reflecting surfaces so dis osed relativel to the lenses that the light fbr one lens wil be swerved upwardly and laterally and the light for the other lens will be swerved downwardly and in the op osite lateral direction, thereby permitting tiie use of picture units that are wider than the distance between the centers of said lenses; substantially as described.

13. A stereosco e rovided with lenses,

and apair of para lel inclined reflecting surfaces cooperating with each lens, the reflecting surfaces for one lens being arranged at an angle oblique to a longitudinal vertical plane, and the other pair of, reflecting surfaces also being arranged at an angle oblique to a longitudinal vertical plane but at an opposite angle to the reflecting surfaces first referred to; substantially as described.

14. A stereoscope provided with lenses, a picture arranged in front of said lenses and composed of picture units that are located in different horizontal lanes. and in the same vertical planes, an means for displacing said picture units into apparent optical coincidence; substantially as described.

15. A stereosco'pe comprising a member provided with lenses, a picture holder arranged in front of said member for supporting a picture made up of picture units that are located indifferent horizontal planes, and reflecting surfaces for deflecting said picture units into apparent optical coinci- 'dence; substantially as described.

16. A stereoscope comprising a member provided with lenses and a air of inclined reflecting surfaces arranged 1I1 front of each lens, the reflectin surfaces for one lens being disposed opposite y to the reflecting surfaces for the other lens, a picture-holder arranged in front of said reflecting surfaces, and a pic ture strip mounted in said holder and provided with picture units that are located in different horizontal planes; substantially as described.

17. A stereosco e comprising a hollow member having orrinary stereoscopic lenses mounted in its front wall, and a pair of parallel inclined mirrors mounted inside of said member in front of each lens, the mirrors for one lens being disposed oppositely to the mirrors forthe other lens so as to dislplace pictures or images located in different orizontal planes into apparent optical coincidence; substantially as described.

18. A stereoscope comprising-a closed hollow member havmg ordinary stereoscopic lenses mounted in one wall thereof, the opposite wall of said member being provided with openings which are covered y glass lates, a palr of parallel mirrors arranged mside of said member and inclined upwardly relatively to one lens, and a pair of arallel ,IHIII'OIS arranged inside of said mem er and inclined downwardly relatively, to the other lens, one pair of mirrors being arranged at an angle obh ue to alongitudinal vertical plane and the ot er air of mirrors being arranged at an angle ob 'que to a longitudinal vertical plane but at an opposite angle to the pair of miriorf first referred to; substantially as descn e 19. A stereoscope comprising a lensholder having lenses and a pair of inclined reflecting mirrors arranged in front of each lens, a hood detachably connected to said lens-holder, and a picture holder to which said lens-holder is ada ted to be connected; substantially as descri ed.

20. A stereoscope comprising a pictureholder provided with rolls on which a picture strip is wound, ahinged' cover and means for holding it in open position, and a lens-holder adj ustably mounted on said cover, said cover being provided with a hinged; section which can be dropped when the lens-holder is ar-,

rariged close to the picture strip; substantia y as described.

21. A stereoscope comprising lenses, a picture. strip containing icture units that are located in different orizontal planes, means for moving said picture strip transversely of the lenses, and reflecting surfaces cooperating with the lenses to displace said picture umts into apparent optical coincldence; substantially as described.

In testimony whereof, I hereunto aflix my signature in the resenceof-two witnesses, this 29th day of ovember, 1907.

v EDWIN P. OROCKER.

Witnesses:

CHESTER C. JQSLAN, GEO. S. MCMILLAN.

In testimony whereof, I hereunto aflix my signature in the resence of two witnesses, this 27th day of ecember, 1907.

Witnesses:

J. E. GOATBEMONT, A, FRANK WARREN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2477007 *Aug 16, 1944Jul 26, 1949Ranger Richard HAereo-stereo device
US2528673 *Sep 24, 1946Nov 7, 1950Taylor Barney LStereoscopic viewing device
US6755533 *Nov 29, 2001Jun 29, 2004Palm, Inc.Moveable display device for three dimensional image creation
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG02B27/2235