Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS917104 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1909
Filing dateSep 29, 1908
Priority dateSep 29, 1908
Publication numberUS 917104 A, US 917104A, US-A-917104, US917104 A, US917104A
InventorsJoseph Murgas
Original AssigneeJoseph Murgas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic-wave detector.
US 917104 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. MURGAS.

MAGNETIC WAVE DETECTOR.

APBLIOATION FILED SEPT. 29, 1908.

Patented Apr. 6, 1909.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

afloznmga I I. I I I I l l l J. MURGAS.

MAGNETIC WAVE DETECTOR.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 29, 1908.

Patented Apr. 6, 1909.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

MW, W

fufozneqa J. MURGAS.

MAGNETIC WAVE DETECTOR.

APPLICATION FILED 52112129, 1908.

Patented Apr. 6, 1909.

' 3 SHEETS-SHEET 3 wi/bmwaao UNTTED strarns rarnn'r osrron.

JOSEPH MURGAS, OF WILKES-BARRE, PENNSYLVANIA.

MAGNETIGWAVE DETECTOR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented April 6, 1909.

Application filed September 29,1908. Serial No, 465,385.

To all-whom itmay come-m: v I

' Be it known that I, Josnrn hTUBGAS, a citis zen of the United States, residing at Wilkes- Barre, in the county of Luzerne' and Stateof Pennsylvania, have invented certainnew and useful Improvements in Magnetic-Wave Detectors, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to means for detect ing electric oscillations suchas are produced in connection with wireless tele raph and has particular relation to that c ass 0 such devices which de end for their operation upon changes pro need in the magnetic condition .of magnetic material such as iron which are occasioned by the passage of the oscillations.

The object of the present invention is to. provide an apparatus of the character described which shall be eiiicient in operation, compact and simple in construction, and of sma cost to manufacture.

The invention is illustrated in theaccompanying drawings of which,

- Figure 1 is a perspective view of the detector; Fig. 2 is a perslpective'view of the field magnets showing t tions for the field magnets, the coil of mag netic conducting material and easing being removed; Fig. 3'. iS a perspective view of the casing; Fig. dis an end view of the casing station and, Fig. 8 shows a modified structure in which permanent in-place of electro mrignets are-employed;

' eferring to the drawings and first to Figs. 1 ton, inclusive, the apparatus comprises thebed plate A from which extend the upright standardsB and C, to which is pivoted the field ,magnet frame 1), the energlzin co1lsEof'wluch are excited from a p suitable soiirce F of current supply. Located within the field frame is-a casing G of hard rubber or other suitable material. in this casing is rotatably mounted the cylinder H carryinglthe coil 1' of conducting magnetic material. I, Supp duetive relation to the field. produced by the a suitable driving belt 0.

- screws the members3 and lande electrical connechere being so wound the cylinder; orted by the casing G in 111- field magnetsis the coil J of conducting terial which, with the telephone receiver. K, constitutesthe means for renderingthe assageof scillations manifest; The usua antenna Land the earth connection M constitute the'means for receiving. the waves or oscillations and conducting themythrou'gh thescoil I. The send stationiis shown at NJ' Thecylinder H an its'coil'are continw ously rota-ted by any suitable means such as Referring now tothe apparatusyabove generally described, in detail it willbe seen that the field frame -D comprises the, end .70

members 1 and'2 and the longitudinal members 3 and 4. To the last mentioned memhersv are securedthepole pieces 5 and 6.-

Radial adjustment of. the pole pieces with relation to thecoil I is errmtted by reason of 7 5 the slots as 7 and 8 in t 1e end-members of the field fra1ne, th-rough which'the screws1'9 and l 10 pass into the ends ofthe members 3'and 4:.

It will be apparent that by loosening these" wit the magnets or moved radially o pole piecesb andfi can be thecoil L The field frame,

as a whole, 1s rotatable-.cireumferentially about the coil upon the studs '11 and 12, be-

ing clamped in-adjusted position by means of .85

the nuts 13and 14. 1 The field Winding E is shown as divided 'into four sections 15, 16, 17 and18. The sections 15 and 16 u on the member 4 are I wound to oppose see other and produce a consequent pole at'6 in a-manner as is well understood, while the sections 17 and 18 upon the member 3 are wound to produce a come quent poleat .5, the'sect'ions of both mem -c o posite olarit in the pole pieces'5 and 'i ie winding E i s connected with ajsource F, in this case shownas a battery, through a re sistance 19 whereby the amount Ofcurrent flowing through the winding and thereby the lot intensity of the magnets may be varied.

The whole pole frame should be constructed of iron to provide good ma netic circuits,

The casing G, w ich is placed between the reception'bf the coil J Ledges as 22 being formed on the casing at each end for supportingthe ends .ofthe coillJ about the shaft of- 23, '24, 25 and 26 upon which are supported thebars 2-7 and 28 which the-rotating cyl them] 80 as to produce poles of 9 5 oles 5 and 6 as shown, is provided with 1011- gitudinally extending slots 20 and 21 for the Fixed inthe casing are studs inder i's 'jouinaledr Thse-bais are prefer-- ablyof brass or other non-magneticmaterial.

The frotatable cylinder H com rises the blocks and31, which'ma be of rass, and upon which is carried a cy inde'r 32 of a re fractory insulating material. A'suitable in' sul'ating material-"of this character hasbeen found to be that known commercially as lavite; FiXed'in the blocks 30 and 31 are '10 the trunnions 33 and 34 which are journaled x in the bars 27 and 28. 'Upon the circum f ference of. the cylinder 32 is-wound-the coil I of magnetic conducting material such as I iron The extremities Of'this coilare elec- 15 trically'connected With'the'tru'nni-ons 33 and 3411 on whichjbear the-springs 35l-and 36 which are respectivelyconnected to the antenna an'dthe ea rth. Itwill be observed that the coil 1 is composed ofa plurality of wires 37 and 38 which arewound side by side and electrically connected in parallel.- The objec't'of using a plurality of wires instead of a single 'vvrir'e of large'siZe is to increase theeificacyof the apparatus by keeping down 25 the ohmic resistanceand increasing the skin effect. a This arrangement facilitates sh'ar -tuning.' The tuning-ma also be-facilitate by a variable inductance T in series with the coil I. This winding of a plurality-of wires 30 inthe same direction and electricall con nected in parallel for the ur ose-speclfied is not to be confounded wit t e winding ofa coil by-a plurality of wires in opposite directions for the purpose of neutra lzingself induction. While under some circumstances it may be advantageous to em loy a non- 4 inductive coil in a paratus em odying my I invention it is usua ly preferred that it shall be inductive-so that tunin will be facilitated and Ihave so illustrated t e coil-in the pres-' ent instance. For the best results'ithe iron wire composing thecoil should be. soft and preferably the annealing for this pur oseis' accom lished after the wire is woun upon the cy 'nder. The heat incident-to such an nealing. would injure substances '(as' for instance hard rubber) whichpossess. the neces sary pno erties as insulators and exce t for the resu ts being subjected to the-heating in the annealing operation, would be satis-' factor To resist this heat-and at the sametime urnish the necessary insulatin qualities, the refractory material such as avite is em loyed.

o rotate the ti s is t1 ylinder and coil thereon,

one of the trunnions is' provided with a pulley 4O from-which abelt' 0 extends to a motor.

It will not; be apparent that when the parts areasseinbled'as'shown, and the field magnets areener ized, a magnetic field will pass from the 'po e piece 5 to the pole piece thieory'of o operation 0' coil of magnetic materialis slowly rotated as indicated netic field, the "magnetic. coilf do not chan spnnse tothe ch which the various elected, but on the tween a magneto-motivei'forceg which tends to dition. field is distorted ma netic material.

in t e lag mentioned .upon th'e passage of oscillations of acter referred to.'

magneti-cfield pro I @ma net; (whichalthough adjustable is normaterial and distortedpos'ition.

magnetic lines o produce an impulsezof maybe detected by receiver K con coil.

which is made adjustable so ratus'may be tuned. Acres is connected a-secondary 4 6 the primary suitable source of high frequency current.

instead of'el will .be seen that th are located -betw andf'51.'.-; Ea. pound, beinlg .magnets.

of each of the. and thereforeto the other.;-' Th the compound m m gether and to the cross heads 52 and means of hijassclam s 54 and 5 heads slidingyupon t e rods srmoa While I do not Wish to be limited, by any eration, it isrny belief that the the deviceis as follows: As the by the arrow Fig; 4, in. the n1ag-. conditions in the ge finstantaneously in Is.-

anges in -magnetisrn to t parts-of the coil are'subv contraryfthere is a lag be ain conditionin the mate cl a production of that con: The result .is that the magnetic by the revolving coil ofv llhe' propert resulting is known est e hysteres of the material ofiwhic'hthc coilis con roduce a cert a of the coil an .structed. The hysteresis is changed by the passage of'high fre uency electricv oscillations through the 'coi distortion in. the field will I other Words, the magnetic field.

and consequently the he changed or, in will shift the char- It appears then that the duced by the stationary a 1y stationa ry)-i's distorted by the reyolw' on'therein o f 'the rotating coil of magnetic is normally stationary in this If now electrical sscillaons pass through the coilfand its hysteresis thereby chan 'ed thefield will shift and force will cut the'coil J and current therein which means of the telephone nected to the-terminals of the At the sending stationtasishownin Fig. 7 the aerial .oriantenna 4i,'theeai th connec on 42, the con "riser 43 and thespark gap Across'thefspark; 'ga and condenser connected an 'adjustabl inductance. 4 5

that the appa. s the spark gap of a;;t ransformer 47 of which'isconneoted with a Referring to Fig. 8 in which permanent ectro ma e cylinder and its casing eenthe permanent magnets chof these magnets is comcomposed of a plurality of bar he construction and mounting magnets issimilar to the other 'adescriptiqnof one will apply e bar magnets compos ng agnet 51 are cla e 53 by 5, these cross 56 and 57. Ad,-

6-, a large part of the magnetism assin justablysecured upon the rods 56 and 57 is through the'imagnetic' material of t e coi asli'der 58which may be secured in any'de-' filpon the cylinder, "-1 ,sired position byaset screw 59, Between gnets arefemployed, it a this slider and the cross hear. 53 are tension net, means for continuously rotating said springs 60 which tend to press the magnet i 0011, means for conducting the oscillations toward the casing of the cylinder. The screw 61, rotatably mounted in a bracket 63 extending from the base of the apparatus, is in screw threaded engagement with the cross head 52;. This screw provides means for withdrawing the magnet from the casing while the adjustal'ile slider 58 aflords a means for adjusting the spring 60. In this construction the casing G is carried upon the frame D. As in Fig. 1 this frame is held in adjusted position by nuts as and 14 and may, when. these nuts are loosened, he retated to adjust the coil J to any desired position about the'axis of the cylinder.

While the invention has been illustrated in what are C011Sl(lI(-.(l its best embodiments, it may be embodied in other structures without departing from its spirit and is notlimited to the structures shown in the drawing.

W hat I claim is 1. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with means for producing a normally stationary magnetic field, a conductor of magnetic material movable in said field, means for continuously moving said conduct-or in said field, means for conducting the oscillations through said conductor, and means in inductive relation to. said field for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest.

2. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with means for producing a normally stationary magnetic field, a coil ofconducting magnetic material rotatable in said field, means for continuously rotating said coil, means for conducting the oscillations through said.coil and means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the pas sage of oscillations manifest.

3. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with a stationary magnet of a coil of conducting magnetic material rotatable in the field of said magnet, means for continuously rotating said coil in said field, means for conducting the oscillations through said coil and means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest.

4. in an electric oscillation detector, the combination with a i'iormally stationary magnet, of a coil of conducting magnetic material, rotatal'ilc in the field of said magnct, means for continrmusly rotating said coil, means for comlucting the oscillations through said coil, and means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest, said magnetbe ing radially adjustable with relation to said coil.

5. In an electric oscillation detector, the

con'ibination With a normally stationary magnet, of. a coil of conducting magnetic material, rotatable in the held of said. magthrough said coil, and means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest, said magnet being circumfercntially adjustable with rela tion to said coil.

6. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with a normally stationary magnet of a coil of conducting magnetic material, rotatable in the field of said magnet, Inc: as for continuously rotating said coil, means for conducting the oscillations through said coil, and means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the passage of oscillations n'ianifcst, said magnet being circumfcrentially and radially adjustable with relation to said coil.

7. in an electric oscillation detector, the combination with a normally stationary magnet, of a coil of conducting magnetic material, rotatable in the field of said magnet, means for continuously rotating said coil, means for conducting the oscillations through said coil, means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the passage of oscillations nianifc-st, and means for varying the intensity of said magnet.

in an electric oscillation detector, the

combination with means for producing amagnetic field, of a coil of conducting magnetic material, said coil and field being rela-' tivcly movable, means for conducting the oscillations through said coil, and means for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest comprisii'ig a coil extending longitudinally of the aforesaid coil.

9. ln an electric oscillation detector, the combination with means for producing a magnetic field, of a conductor of magnetic material in said field, means for rendering the passage of the oscillations manifest comprismg a coil in inductive relation to said field, said coil and field being normally stationary with relation to each other but said coil and field on the one hand and said cond uctor on the other being relatively movable, and means for conducting the oscillations through said conductor.

10. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with a support, of magnets mounted thereon, a coil of conducting magnetic material rotatably mounted upon said support within the field of said magnet, a casing about said coil, means for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest comprising a coil supported by said casing and extending longitudinally of theaforesaid coil of magnetic material, means for rotating the said coil of. magnetic material and means for conducting the oscillations through said coil of magnetic material.

11. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with a support, of magnets mounted thereon, a coil of conducting magnetic material rotatabl mounted upon said. support within the fie d of said magnet, a casing inclosing said coil circumferentially, means for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest comprising a coil supported by said casing and extending longitudinally of the aforesaid coil of magnetic material, means for rotating the said coil of magnetic material and means for conducting the oscillations through said coil of. magnetic mate r1a 12. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with means for producing a magnetic field, a coil of conducting magnetic material in said field, said coil and field being relatively movable and said coil comprising a plurality of wires Wound in the same direc tion and connected in parallel, means for conducting the oscillations through said coil and means in inductive relation to said field for rendering the passage of oscillations manifest.

13. In an electric oscillation detector, the combination with means for producing a magnetic field, of a body of conducting magnetic material rotatable in said field, means for conducting the oscillations through said body and means for rendering the passage of the oscillations manifest comprising a coil of conducting material Wound longitudinally of the axis of rotation of said body.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

V JOSEPH MUReAs. Witnesses:

JOHN P. PoLLooK,

CLAIRE JOHNSTON.

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG01R23/02