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Publication numberUS918069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1909
Filing dateNov 27, 1905
Priority dateNov 27, 1905
Publication numberUS 918069 A, US 918069A, US-A-918069, US918069 A, US918069A
InventorsCasteran J Marius, Frances G Marius
Original AssigneeCasteran J Marius, Frances G Marius
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process or method of casting abrading, grinding, cutting, and polishing substances in a metallic matrix.
US 918069 A
Abstract  available in
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. J. & F. G. MARIUS. PROCESS 0R METHOD OF CASTING ABRADING, GRINDING, CUTTING, AND POLISHING SUBSTANCES IN A METALLIC MATRIX.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 27, 1905.

91 8,069 Patented Apr. 13, 1909.

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2V5 blesses G. J. & P. G. MARIUS. PROCESS ORIMETHOD OP CASTING, ABRADING, GRINDING, CUTTING, AND POLISHING SUBSTANCES IN A METALLIC MATRIX.

APPLIOATION FILED NOV. 27, 1905.

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fiancw d/flarw 2 L 7 or for the purposes of anti-slipping as the same may be set in a sidewa'l I suitable rnetal or other s11 UNITED smrns PATENT OFFICE.

GASTERAN J. MARIUS AND FRANCES G. MARIUS, OF WEST HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY.

PROCESS '03 METHOD OF CASTING A BRADING,

enmnmc, cu'r'rmo, am) rous'nnrc SUBSTANCES IN A METALLIC MATRIX.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented April 13, 1909.

Application filed November 27, 1906. Serial No. 289,801.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, OAs-TERAN J. MARIUS and FRANCES G. MARIUS, citizens of the United States of America, and residents of West Hoboken, in the county of Hudson, State of New Jersey, have invented a certain new and useful Improved Process or Method of Casting Abrading, Grinding, Cutting, and Polishing Substances in a Metallic Matrix, of which the followin is a specification.

Our invention re ates to ess or method of casting abrading, grinding, cutting or polishing'subst'ances in a metallic matrix, adapted to hold the same in a firm setting, for the purposes of the various uses to which the same may be applied, as for instance, cutting, abrading or polishing tools, devices, or other suitable place to foot on a concrete metal or glass 'avement, or the comblnation of these,

and a so for the new article of manufacture produced as the result of the casting.

' Weave aware that it is not new with us to grinding or abradin materials with a stance adapted to hold the same in a matrix. I

Our method relates to a particular manner of accomplishing this result in order that the abrading materials may be uniformly distributed throughout the metallic matrix with approximately predetermined relation one to t e other.

The difliculties which have been encountered heretofore in casting a metallic matrix embracing abrading materials has been that when the molten metal is mixed with the .a'brading material in a molten condition, the

abrading material being lighter will be disturbed in its position by the inflow of the molten metal. This is particularl the case, where the abrading material is. finelydivided, the result being that when the cast is set, the abradi'ng material is found either as having risen to the surface of the molten metal, or as having been crowded together in one particular art; at all events, as having been removed from its ori 'nal position In the mold. In other word by the processes an Improved procprevent the slipping of the i we mean such'm'ateria'ls as diamond dust,

corundurn, carborundum, emery and equiv lent materials.

, We have diagrammatically illustrated our invention in t e accompanying drawings, designating the parts by numerals, referring to like arts by like numerals.

The drawings, Figure 1 to Fig. 13, inclusive, all illustrate vertical" sections in diagrammatic form, with the exception of Fig. 9, which is a perspective view of a disk or button. adapted to be used in connection with a concrete pavement or vault light, to prevent the foot from slipping in passing over such 1pavement or grating.

We wil now proceed to describe our method or process, referring to the drawings as occasion may require. As heretofore stated, the fundamental principle involved in our process is that of holding in a fixed position the abrading material during the period that the molten metal is embracing the same. This maybe accomplished in several Ways without departing from the s hit of our invention. We will describe tliese processes in their several steps and stages.

Referring to Fig. 1, (1) represents a mold or retort adapted to receive and form the casting desired to be made. (2) represents an abradingmaterial, such for instance, as carborundum, suitably divided into articles according to the size or mesh requlred for the purposes for which the ultimate product is intended to be used. A stratum of such particles of carborundum is laid at the base of the mold (1). The second step is that of adding finely divided metal, such for instance, as steel, having a weight greater thanthat of the carborundum and being more linely divided. This is-- p'onred overthe strata oi earborundum, asshown in Fig. .2, and indicated as (3), wluch-lsshown The fact that the steel by etched lines. particles in this case are of-- s'rrialler mesh than the earborundum particles will permit the steel particles to sift down between the interstices lying within the earborundum strata, until the same are practically filled. I apply enough of these steel particles to fill the interstices of the earborundum strata and to overlay it in order to hold the same firmly in position. We then pour on to these two strata molten metal, such for instance, as zinc or other com )Olll'ld or comosite metal. W'e have in icated this in ig. 3 at (4). The result will be that the molten metal will flow through the inter stices of the two strata last described and entirely embrace all of the particles, the weight of the metal start-a (3) being suliicient to hold the earborundum or other molten material in position during the period of casting. When the metal is set, the earborundum will be in approximately the same position as when it was introduced into the mold and the product will exhibit the earborundum inclosed in matrix.

The second form of the application of our process is illustrated in Fig. 4. In this figure, we make a strata of earborundum or other suitable abrading material of a predetermined size or mesh, as indicated at (2). We overlay this strata with a second strata of metal, as for instance, steel or other heavy metal, the mesh being substantially the same or greater than that of the earborundum strata (2). This will result in the steel strata lying on top of the earborundum strata without passing into the interstices of the same, as described in the last operation. (4) indicates the metal poured on top of the steel strata in a molten condition. This metal, it will be appreciated, will pass through both metal and earborundum strata and fill the interstices thereof, thus forming a metallic matrix as heretofore described.

In Fig. 5, we illustrate still another form of the same general principle, wherein we form a strata of earborundum particles and overlying the same is a strata of finely divided metal, suitable itself to become the metallic matrix, as for instance, zinc or lead, or composite metal. The latter stratum is more finely divided than the earborundum stratum, and, therefore, passes through the interstices of the earborundum strata and a metallic in likesnrannera metallic -matrix embracing: the abrarlingmaterial. r

In the operation 01' the last r-lescribed method, itis desirable that the act of heat ing and cooling be accomplished suddenly in order that the abrading material may not have time within which to change its position, the fact of the matrix metal being mixed with the abrading material in advance decreasing the liability of disturbance by reason of the limited ilowof the matrix metal, the weight of the matrix metal operating to hold the abrading material in position until the matrix metal is melted, when the setting of such metal should be accom lished immediately, at all events, before t 1e osition of the particles oi abrading materia would be materially disturbed. We may also accomplish the same result by finely dividing metal particles, such as steel, and coating the same with an adhesive substance, (preferably such as is not affected by heat) and then mixing with the coated steel particles,

a finely divided earborundum or other suitable abrading material. The result of this will be that the steel particles will become coated with the earborundum particles, but throughout the whole mass, when thus mixed will be interstices suitable for the assag'e of molten metal, Wl'llCll is adapted to orm a metallic matrix. l/Ve have found that by this method a very uniform casting can be made, the carlmrundum particles clinging to the steel particles and when they are all mixed together causing a separation between the steel particles. Of course, it would be understood, that the adhesive material may be applied either to the metal articles or to the carborundum particles. v ehave illustrated this process in diagrammatic magnified form in Fig. 12, wherein (2) represents the carborundum or equivalent material and (3) the steel particles, or vice versa, as heretofore statec.

We illustrate another form in Figs. 6, 7 and 8. In this form, ,we apply to the bottom of the retort or mold an adhesive material, such as a cement, a wax, a plastic or a glue indicated as (6). This adhesive material may be of a substance not affected by heat, such for instance, as laster oiparis or an equivalent material. i e then throw into the retort a quantity of the abrading material, such as carborundum,causing the same to contact with the adhesive substance as at (6) and adhere to the same. When the adhesive matcrial is dried or set, holding or embracing the earborundum in a firm or fixed position at the base of the mold, we throw out of the mold all of that portion of the earborundum, which has not adhered to the base of the the mold, and pour into the mold molten {permit the inas'stocool. and set, thns'lormingthe carborundum or other particles v and so holding heme metal, such as heretofore described, and permit the same to set. The metal, it will be readily ap reciated, will embrace the partielse of car. orund-um or other similar material and hold the same in a metallic matrix. The retaining agent can'then be removed.

In .Fig. 13, we have illustrated another form in which we may apply mechanical means for holding the carborundum in position in the )rocessof molding, which consists of a mold 21) having a lid (2), hinged at (3) and areceivin port (4). Wehave illustrated the carborundum or other e uivalent material (5) ascontained within t is mold, and completely filling the same, the lid being closed, the carborundum is held mechanically and firmly in osition. The molten metal is poured Into t e port (4) until all the interstices lying between the particles of carborundum are filled. The product is illustrated in Figs. 9, 10 and 11, wherein (2) v is the abrading material and (7) the matrix. The carborundum is found in the metallic matrix in approximately the same osition as it was found in the original mold, ut embraced and inclosed bya metallic matrix, 11. e., bear to each other substantially the same relation as they did in the mold, and we have a product wherein the abrading material is ap proximately uniformly distributed throughout'the metallic matrix, or in substantially a predetermined position. Of course, the position of the carborundum varied from time to time as occasion may require. They may be .cast all along one surface of the metallic matrix or placed in any other position that may be suitable or convenient by regulating the strata or form in which the same is placed in the mold in association with the binding or holding agent.

Referring to the metal employed b us to form the metallic matrix, this may 5 preferably is, of a malleable quality, as we find that such metal has certain advantages. We do not intend, however, to limit ourselves to malleable metal for we may employ other metal. We may also employ crushed steel as an abrading material and may combine-the same with co per or other metals.

What we clhim as by Letters Patent is:

1. The method or process of casting abrading material in a metallic matrix to form an abrading mixture, which consists in mechanical] holding the abrading material in a fixed position in a mold or retort, and intermixing the same with the metal which is to form the metallic matrix by causing the latter to flow in a molten condition in the interstices between the abrading material the metal has set.

particles may be v eandnew and' desire to secure 2. The method or process of casting abrading material in a metallic matrix to form an abrading mixture, which consists in mechanically holding the abrading material in a fixed position in a mold or retort and intermixing the same with a metallic binding material by fusing or fluxing the latter in the interstices between the abrading material.

L 3. The method or process of castirr abrading material in a metallic matrix, which consists in placing abrading material divided intosuitable particles in a retort or mold, then overlaying this strata of abrading ma terial with divided particles of metal having sufiicient weight to hold the abradingmaterial in osition during, the operation of casting, t on causing a metal adapted to form a metallic matrix to flow in a molten condition into and through the interstices of the two strata above described and fill the same. 4. The method or process of casting abrading material in-a metallic matrix, which consists in dividing into suitable articlesjthe abrading material and a metal having suflicient weight to hold the abrading material in position during the process of casting, then mterminglin the divided particles in a suitable mold, t on causing a metal suitable to form a metallic matrix to flow in a molten condition into theinterstices between the particles of abrading material and the particles of metal.

5. The method or process of casting abrading material in a metallic matrix, which consists in mixing divided particles of the abrading material with divided particles of a metal causing the metal which is to form the metween said divided terial and the divided particles of metal.

6. The method-or process of casting abrading material in a metallic matrix whlch consists in first placin divided into suitab e particles into a mold then pouring on this strata of abrading material a metal more finely divided than the abrading material and heavier than it and permitting the same to sift down into the in terstices between the particles of abrading material, and then causing a metal suitable to form the metallic matrix to flow in a molten condition into the interstices beabrading material.

. 7. The method or process of casting abrading material in a metallic matrix, wlnch consists in first placin the abrading material divided into suitab e particles into a mold, then pouring on this strata of abrading material, a metal more finely divided than the the abrading material until abrading material and heavier than it and heavier than the abrading material and then tallic matrix to flow into the interstices be particles of abrading mathe abrading material tween the divided particles of metal and permitting the same to sift down into the interstices between the particles of abrading material and then causing a metal suitable to form the metallic matrix, divided still interstices between the abrading particles.

finer than the last two mentioned to flow or sift between the interstices of the abrading material and metal and then applying heat.

8. The process of casting abra ing material in a metallic matrix, which consists in dividing into suitable particles the abrading. material, lacing a stratum of said particles in a suita le receptacle and while mechanically holding the particles of abrading maf S terial in position in fixed contact with each other in the receptacle, and intermixing the 15 same with a metallic binding material by ouring metal in a molten condition into the Signed by us at West Hoboken, in the county of Hudson, State of N. J this 14th 20 day of November, 1905.

OASTERAN J. MARIUS. FRANCES G. MARIUS.

Witnesses:

MORRIS EICHMANN, LEVI R. MYERSON.

Referenced by
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US2607677 *Jan 14, 1949Aug 19, 1952Ohio Brass CoInserts for current collectors
US3157143 *Sep 14, 1960Nov 17, 1964Philips CorpSolder tip
US4070796 *Dec 27, 1971Jan 31, 1978Norton CompanyMethod of producing abrasive grits
US5188164 *Jul 31, 1990Feb 23, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming macrocomposite bodies by self-generated vacuum techniques using a glassy seal
US5224533 *May 22, 1992Jul 6, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composite bodies by a self-generated vaccum process, and products produced therefrom
US5247986 *Jan 21, 1992Sep 28, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming macrocomposite bodies by self-generated vacuum techniques, and products produced therefrom
US5287911 *May 14, 1992Feb 22, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composites having variable filler loadings and products produced thereby
US5301738 *Feb 24, 1992Apr 12, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of modifying the properties of a metal matrix composite body
US5507336 *Jan 17, 1995Apr 16, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of constructing fully dense metal molds and parts
US5518061 *Feb 22, 1994May 21, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of modifying the properties of a metal matrix composite body
US5638886 *Nov 22, 1995Jun 17, 1997Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composites having variable filler loadings
US5848349 *Jun 25, 1993Dec 8, 1998Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of modifying the properties of a metal matrix composite body
US20030150585 *Jan 27, 2003Aug 14, 2003Northeastern UniversityMethod for manufacturing composite materials
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB22D23/06