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Publication numberUS920848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1909
Filing dateJun 9, 1908
Priority dateJun 9, 1908
Publication numberUS 920848 A, US 920848A, US-A-920848, US920848 A, US920848A
InventorsReuben B Eubank Jr
Original AssigneeBicycle Skate & Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roller-skate.
US 920848 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. B. EUBANK, J3.

ROLLER SKATE. APPLIOATIOII FILED JUNE 9, 1908.

Patented May 4, 1909.

2 SHEEN-SHEET 8.

PVITNESSL'S A TZORNE UNITED sTACrEs ltATENT OFFICE.

REUBEN B. sUBANK, JR, OF KANSAS crrY, mssoonr, ASSIGNOR To 'rns BICYCLE SKATE a MFG. C0., A CORPORATION'OF MISSOURI.

ROLLER-SKATE Specification 0'! Letters Patent.

Patented May 4, 1909.

' Application filed June 9', 1908. Serial No. 437,480.

To ll whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, REUBEN B. EUBANK,

Jr., a citizen of the United States, residing at Kansas City, in the county of Jackson and State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Roller-Skates, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in roller skates; and it consists in the novel construction, combination, and arrangement of parts hereinafter described, ointed out in the claims, and illustrated in t e accompanying drawings.

Referring now to said drawings, Figure 1 represents a side elevation of my improved skate. Fig. 2 is an inverted plan view of the same. Fig. 3 is an inverted plan view' of the foot-plate of the skate with a number of parts removed. Fi 4 is .a transverse section on line IV-IV 0i Fig. 2. Fig. 5 is a broken inverted plan view. of'thefoot-plate. "Fig. 6 is asection on line VIVI of Fig. 2. Fig. 7 is an irregular vertical section on line VIIVI I of Fig. 1.

In carr out the invention I employ a foot-plate 1' aving two pairs of depending lugs 2 and 3, a pair of upwardly-extending;

\ lugs 4, and a pair of upwardly-extending loops 5. a

- 6 designates a rear bracket pivotally secured at its forward end by a pin 7 to lugs 2, so that its rear portion may have limited up and down movement. 8 designates a cushioning-device in the form of a pair of coil springs interposed between the foot-plate and bracket 6- and embracing a pair of studs 9', fixed to the foot-plate and extending loosely through the rear portion of the bracket. The lower ends of studs 9 are provided with retaining-nuts 10, which limit the downward'movement of the rear portion of bracket 6.

11 deslgnates a memberpivotally secured by a bolt 12 to. the front end of the footpate so that its rear end may swing aterally to said foot-plate, and in order that said swinging movement will be attended with but little friction I interp ose a bal1-bearing-13 between the front end of the pivoted member and the foot-plate, and a all-bearing 14 between the rear end of said member and the foot-plate. Member 11 is provided near its forward end with a pair of depending lugs 15 and its rear end is prevented from springing downward by a I segmental retaining-plate 16 secured to the underside of the foot-plate.

bracket pivot/ally 22 fixed to the rear endof member 11 and extending loosely, through bracket 19 cushioning-device in the form of a pair 0t springs 23 is interposed between the rear portion of member 11 and bracket 19. By securing bracket 19 to the pivoted member 11 convenient -means is afl'orded whereby the skater may describe curves without lifting the skates from the floor.

.24 designates a pair of axles secured to the lower ends of brackets 6 and 19, and provided with a pair of rollers 25, which are preferably of metal as I have found by practice that the cushioning-devices 8 and 23 answer the same purpose as rubber-tiresm absorbing shocks caused by the rollers passing over obstructions, and are much more durable than said tires. i

26 designates a pair of'braces for rel1ev1ng the ankles of the skater of lateral strain. Sa1d braces are pivotall secured to lugs 4 by bolts 27 and are provi ed with downwardly and forwardly-extending arms 26, provl ed at their lower ends with a pair of ratchet-heads 28, upon which the upper end of a yoke 29 1s adjustably secured by ineans of a bolt 30 and a clamping-nut 31, so that a rotary brakeshoe 32 journaled in the lower portion of the yoke may be adjusted toward or away from the rear roller 25.- The brake-shoe 32 forms a convenient means foreontrolling the speed or stopping the skate, as it may be thrown into contact with the rear roller 25 by mchning the braces 26 forwardly.

33 designates a flexible metallic strap connecting the lower portions of the braces, and 34 designates a leather band secured to the upper ends of said bra'ces and provided with buckles 35 whereby it may be irmly secured in position on the skaters limb.

36 designates a toe-strap provided witha buckle 37.

38 designates an instep-strap provided with a buckle 39 and secured to a pair, of loops 40 pivotally mounted on bolts 27.

41 designates a clamp for assisting straps 36 and 37 in securing the skate to the skaters shoe. One side of said clamp is pivotally secured to the underside of the foot-plate by a bolt 42 and a nut 43, while the otherside of said clamp is secured to a cam 44 whereby it may be adjusted into or out of engagement with the sole of the shoe. The two sides of the clamp are further secured in position by loops 45 at the underside of the foot-plate 1.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A roller skate consistingof a foot-plate, front and rear brackets beneath the same,

rollers mounted in said brackets, a member pivoted at its forward end to the front end of the foot-plate so that its rear end may swing laterally, means pivotally connecting the forward end of the front bracket to said pivoted member so that its rear end may swing up and down, and a cushioning device interposed between the rear end of the pivoted member and said front bracket.

2. A roller-skate consisting of a foot-plate, front and rear brackets beneath the same, rollers mounted in said brackets, a member pivoted at its forward end to the front end of the foot-plate so that its rear end may swing laterally, means pivotally connecting the forward end of the front bracket to said pivoted member so that its rear end may swing up and down, studs extending down from the rear end of the pivoted member through the rear end of the front bracket and vertlcallyslidable therein, and s rings interposed between said bracket an the rear end of the pivoted member.

3. A roller-skate consisting of a foot-plate, means for securing the same to a skaters foot, front and rear brackets beneath the same, rollers mounted in said brackets, a member pivoted at its forward end to the front end of the foot-plate so that its rear end may swing laterally, means pivotally connecting the forward end of the front bracket to said pivoted member so that its rear end may swmg up and down, and a cushioning device interposed between the rear end of the pivoted member and said front bracket.

4. A roller skate consisting of a foot-plate,

front and rear brackets beneath the same,

rollers mounted in said brackets, a member pivoted at its forward end to the front end of the foot-plate so that its rear end may swing I laterally, resilient means secured to the rear end of said pivoted member for normally holding the same in line with the lengitudinal axis of the foot-plate, means pivotally connecting the forward end of the front bracket to said may swmg up and down, and a cushioning device interposed between the rear end of the REUBEN 'B. EUBANK, JR.

Witnesses: I

F. G. Frsonnn, M. Cox.

ivoted member so that its rear end

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2552987 *May 26, 1947May 15, 1951Jr Fred LoertzRoller skate
US4061348 *Dec 20, 1976Dec 6, 1977Carter Lewis HRoller skates
US4418929 *Apr 26, 1982Dec 6, 1983Gray William JSingle roller skate
US4666168 *Apr 12, 1984May 19, 1987Roller Barons, Inc.Roller skate apparatus
US4666169 *Oct 29, 1984May 19, 1987Roller Barons, Inc.Skate apparatus
US5183275 *Jan 30, 1992Feb 2, 1993Hoskin Robert FBrake for in-line roller skate
US5374070 *Apr 23, 1993Dec 20, 1994Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5397137 *Oct 14, 1993Mar 14, 1995Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5411276 *Feb 24, 1994May 2, 1995Rollerblade, Inc.Roller skate brake
US5415419 *Dec 22, 1993May 16, 1995Canstar Sports Group Inc.Braking system for in-line skates
US5435580 *Feb 14, 1994Jul 25, 1995Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5465984 *Sep 1, 1993Nov 14, 1995Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5487552 *Jul 1, 1994Jan 30, 1996Canstar Sports Group Inc.Braking mechanism for in-line skates
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US5564718 *May 31, 1994Oct 15, 1996Out Of Line Sports Inc.Ground engaging skate brake
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US5755450 *Oct 18, 1996May 26, 1998Reebok International Ltd.Braking system for an in-line skate
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US5836590 *Feb 18, 1997Nov 17, 1998Out Of Line Sports, Inc.Method and apparatus for slowing or stopping a roller skate
US5882019 *Feb 13, 1995Mar 16, 1999Nordica, S.P.A.Braking device, particularly for skates
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US6595529 *May 20, 2002Jul 22, 2003Arthur G. ErdmanMulti-hinged skate and methods for construction of the same
US7175187Jul 28, 2003Feb 13, 2007Lyden Robert MWheeled skate with step-in binding and brakes
US7182347May 2, 2003Feb 27, 2007Erdman Arthur GMulti-hinged skate and methods for construction of the same
US7464944Oct 19, 2006Dec 16, 2008Lyden Robert MWheeled skate
DE19916588C2 *Apr 13, 1999Aug 16, 2001Otto EderVorrichtung zur rollenden Fortbewegung
EP0600274A1 Nov 10, 1993Jun 8, 1994NORDICA S.p.ABraking device particularly for skates
EP0850670A1Dec 10, 1997Jul 1, 1998Skis Rossignol S.A.In-line skate with removable shoe
EP0853964A1Jan 14, 1998Jul 22, 1998Skis Rossignol S.A.In-line skates with a brake effective on the wheels
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/1409