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Publication numberUS923890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 8, 1909
Filing dateSep 9, 1908
Priority dateSep 9, 1908
Publication numberUS 923890 A, US 923890A, US-A-923890, US923890 A, US923890A
InventorsCharles C Puffer
Original AssigneePfaudler Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packing.
US 923890 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. G. PUFPER. PACKING. APPLIOATION FILED SEPT. 9. 1908.

923,890, Patented June 8,1909.

nnrrnn sra rnsi PATENT enrich.

CHARLES (I. BUFFER, OF ROCHESTERNEW YORK. ASSIGNOR TO THE IFAUDLER (70.

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

PACKING.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 8, 1909.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that LCHARLEs C. PUFFER,,

of Rochester, in the county of Monroe and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful lm rovements in Packing; and I do hereby deo are the following to be a lull, clear, and exact descri tion of the same, reference being had to t e accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, and to the reference numerals marked thereon.

The present invention relates to the packing of joints between sectional vessels such as large tanks or vats for beer orthe like, and it has {or an object to provide for effectively covering the usual compressible sealing material on the interior of the vessel in such a manner that the collection of matter that would ailect the contents of the vessel cannot take place, and, at the same time a construction of covering is provided that will not retard the drawing of the sections -to+ gether to compress the sealing material.

To these and other-ends the invention consists in certain improvements and combinations of parts all as will be hereinafter more fully described, the novel features being pointed out in the claims at the end of the specification.

In the drawings: Figure l is a sectional view of portions of two tank sections and a packing therefor, prior to the compression of the latter; Fig. 2 is a like view showing the same packing compressed; Fig. 3 is a detail erspective view of a portion of the covering or the inner edge of the sealing material} Fig. 4 is a sectional view of another embodiment of the )acking in whichthe covering is of slightly dlfferent form and the compressi ble sealing material ismade of two pieces instead of one folded piece, as shown in Figs. 1 and P2; and Fig. 5 shows an embodiment in which the covering has a portion embedded in one end of a solid piece of sealing material.

The usual covering for compressible sealing material of the tppe arranged between the sections of a vesse is so constructed that it interferes with the drawing of the sections together to compress the sealing material, and, at the same time owing to the fact that the coverings are usually of metal with broad faces engaging the tank sections a it does not interfere with the compression of the sealing material, and engages the sections in such a manner that a tight joint is possible. The vessel in this instance is made up of a plurality of sections in the form oi rings 1 which have laterally turned flanges 2 at their proximate edges connected to these rings by curved portions 2 'and held together in any suitable manner, such as bolts .ipassing through perforations in the flanges and serving to draw the sections together; the

inner surface of the sections being preferably lined with enamel or other material which 1s not liable to be attacked by the contents of the vessel.

Arranged between the sections or the flanges thereof is the packing which in this instance comprises a compressible sealing material preferably non-absorbent, like ebonite, and a covering portion for the inner ed e that does not retard the compression. In igs. 1 and 2 the sealing-material is in the form of a double strip 4, the turn of which is disposed outwardly and the free edges of which are covered by a metal strip, shown in Fig. 3, consisting in this instance of a web 5 having oppositely extending covering flanges 7 at one edge providing the covering portion which is substantially equal in width to the width'of the compressible sealing material and retaining ribs 8 on the opposite sides near the other edge. The opposed walls of the flanges 7 and ribs 8 are inclined or converge toward their bases at 7 and 8 respectively, and the outer or contacting edges of the flanges 7 are narrow or thin. When this form of packing is compressed by operating bolts 3 or by other means, the sealing material is held withgreat pressure about the outer edges of the covering or flanges 7, which being very narrow do not permit the formation of any crevices which are not filled by the sealing material and the sealing material is practically covered toward the interior' of the vessel. The inclined faces 7 and 8 cause the sealing material to be compressed to a greater degree near its inner edge, while the flanges 8 prevent the covering e flanges 7 being the same as in. the other 1 embodiment and having their faces 7 on the web side inclined to cause the compressible material to be forced about the edges of the covering. The effect of this embodiment is the same as that shown in Figs. 1 to 3 but owing to the different formation of the retaining ribs, the compression of the sealing material is not so great. i

In Fig. 5 the sealing material is one solid piece 4 having a slot. in its inner edge to re ceive the web 5* of the covering, the web in this instance being smooth on both faces.

A packing constructed in accordance with this invention will not have any crevices in which matter may collect to affect the contents ofthe Vessel. The covering which is made of material that will not be attacked by the contents of the vessel contacts with the vessel sections only slightly and as a consequence the enamel surface is not injured and at the same time a close fitting is secured. Should the covering not form a tight joint at any point the sealing material is highly compressed about the edges of the covering due to the fact that web 5 does not extend entirely through the sealing material and to the inclined inner faces of the covering. The inclined faces force the sealing material over the narrow edges of the covering which when made of hard metal will sever the projecting portions by reason of the engagement of the sharp edges with the flanges;

This operation prevents the formation of pockets in rear of the covering and the covering by engaging the flanges in proximity to the curved portions 2 prevents the formation of any sharp corners in which bacteria is liable to collect. In some instances, when the contents of the Vessel will permit it. the covering is made of soft metal so that the sharp edges of the flanges are compressed by engagement with the vessel sections. The forms herein shown may be formed inexpensively by machineryrand the installation is very simple.

What I claim is:

1. In a packing for joints, the combination with a compressible sealing material, of a covering for one edge of the sealing ma terial comprising a Web projecting into the sealing material but not extending through the latter, and a hard metal covering portion projecting in opposite directions from one edge of the web and having its inner side inclined and also having a width substantially equal to the eompressed'sealing material the edges of said oppositely projecting portions being sharp.

2. In a packing for joints, the combination with a compressible sealing material, of a covering for one edge of the sealing material comprising a web projecting into the sealing material and hard metal covering flanges arranged only at one end of the sealing material and having inclined inner faces and a combined width substantially equal to the compressed sealing material the outer end of said flanges being sharp.

3. In a packing for joints, the combination with a compressible sealing material, of a covering for one edge of the sealing material comprising a web fitting in the sealing material, retaining ribs on the web, and covering flanges projecting in opposite directions from the web near one edge only of the latter.

4. In a packing for joints, the combination with a compressible sealing material, of a covering for one edge of the sealing material comprising a web projecting into the said sealing material and a covering portion projecting in opposite directions from one edge of the sealing material and having narrow edges to contact with the walls of the joint.

5. The combination with a pair of enameled sections provided with outwardly turned flanges and curved portions connecting the flanges with the main portions of the sections, of a packing interposed between the flanges of the sections comprising a compressible sealing material, and a hard metal covering embodying a web projecting into the sealing material and oppositely extending flanges having their inner faces inclined and contacting with the proximate edge of the sealing material and their outer ends sharp and cooperating with the flanges ol' the sections in proximity to the curved portions.

CHARLES (3. PUFFlClt.

itnesses:

RUssELL B. GRIFFITH, HAnoLn II. Sums.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2490272 *May 13, 1946Dec 6, 1949Kascle CliffordPortable swimming pool
US2609003 *Dec 4, 1945Sep 2, 1952Kass Samuel MLeak closure
US2900200 *Nov 4, 1954Aug 18, 1959American Portable Irrigation CPacked sleeve coupling for flared conduits
US4518168 *Mar 2, 1984May 21, 1985Dana CorporationMulti-thickness fire ring assembly
US5391116 *Aug 17, 1993Feb 21, 1995Brunswick Bowling & BilliardsGuide finger for a pinsetter
US5573282 *Feb 16, 1995Nov 12, 1996United Pipeline System, Usa, Inc.Low turbulence joint for lined slurry pipeline
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S285/91, F16J15/128