Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS927077 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1909
Filing dateMay 18, 1907
Priority dateMay 18, 1907
Publication numberUS 927077 A, US 927077A, US-A-927077, US927077 A, US927077A
InventorsCharles H Richards
Original AssigneeLouis Armstrong
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grinding-disk.
US 927077 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- Wa' Znes'sas C. H. RICH S.

. GRINDING D APPLIGATIGN FILED MAY 18, X907. 927,077. Patented July 6,1909

` EET 2 SHEETS-SH 2.

MW? q l lllll Ii umm...

............. Y huur mlm Hmm m......

"lvf`\:2m ma m A llfarnfg/S.

NITED STATES OFFICE.

CHARLES II. RICHARDS, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSICNOR TO LOUIS ARMSTRONG, OF CIIICAGO, ILLINOIS.

GRINDING-DISK.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 6, 1909.

Application filed May 18, 1907. Serial No. 374,360.

To all whom it may concer/a:

Be it known that I, CHARLES II. RIGH- Anns, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Grinding- Disks, and I do hereby declarethat the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

This invention relates to improvements in millstone-dresses and more especially to the construction in the working faces of a pair of plates or disks adapted for treating particles of cooked or partially cooked corn or other cereal to lirst flatten and thereafter roll the particles into individual linished form.

My invention consists in the matters hereinafter set forth and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings :--Figures l and 2 are plan views of the working faces of the two grinding plates or bur wheels. Figs. 3 and 4 are enlarged detail plan views of portions of the two plates shown in Figs. l and 2, respectively. Fig. 5 is a section taken on lines 5--5 of Figs. l and 2 showing the two plates arranged in operative relation to each other. Fig. 6 is a section taken on the lines 6-6 of Figs. 3 and 4 showing the two plates arranged. in operative relation to each other. Fig. 7 is a section on the line 77 of Fig. 4. Fig. S is a section on the line 8-8 of Fig. 3.

As shown in said drawings, A and A1 indicate the grinding plates or disks which are of the well-known annular form and` will usually be arranged in vertical planes, with their working faces toward each other and separated about a thirty-second of an inch. Either or both of said disks may be turned or driven in such manner as to afford rela tive rotative movement between them. Preferably the grinding disks are rotated in opposite directions in order that the relative movement between their faces may be large without the necessity of rotating either plate at a greater' speed than is convenient. The working faces of the disks are of like construction with the exception of a slight difference in the arrangement of the furrows in their working faces, as will hereinafter be explained. Each of said disks has the usual eye a and is provided on its inner' face with. a central concave part or :recess A2 concentric with the eye, into which is fed the material to be acted upon, and outside ofsaid recess with an annular marginal grinding surface which is generally flat, and parallel with the corresponding surface of the other disk, and on which are formed feeding and grinding channels or furrows and intervening lands or ridges. The said recesses A2 are made of considerable depth and occupy a substan tial part of the central part of the disk.

Each of the disks is provided on its marginal working ortion with alternate broad lands B and relatively narrower grooves or furrows C C1. The said furrows are arranged to extend from the inner' to the outer margin. of the annular working surface, and are inclined with respect to radial lines of the disks. The outer parts of the furrows are inclined with respect to the main parts thereof and are disposed at smaller angles with the radial lines of the disks, the purpose of such change in direction of the fur rows being to lessen at the outer parts of the disks the rate of outward. feed or travel of the material being acted upon. rllhe faces of the lands B B are flat and in planes pern pendicular to the axis of rotation of the disks. The lands and furrows occupy that annular portion of the disk which, in grinding disks, have heretofore been known as the skirt of the disk.

Each of the furrows C Cl is formed with a shoulder c at one side thereof, said shoulder' being perpendicular to the flat faces of the lands B B, and an inclined bottom surface c1 which extends from the plane of the land and meets the bottom or inner edge of the said shoulder c. The two disks are rotated, as shown by the arrows on Figs. 3 and 4, in a direction to carry the shoulders c of the furrows C in advance of the inclined sur faces c1 thereof.

The two disks A Al are also provided with a series of auxiliary recesses or furrows, located adjacent to and extending outwardly from the central recesses of said disks and of which those in the disk A are indicated by `:D D and those in the disk A1 are indicated by D1 D1. One of the said furrows I) or D1 is located at the inner end. of each of the main furrows C C1. The auxiliary furrows extend diagonally across the inner ends of the main furrows. Said furrows or recesses D Dl are, moreover, provided with bottom surfaces which are inclined in the same direction as the bottom surfaces of the main furrows C Cl, but which are at a greater inclination to the flat surfaces of the lands than the said furrows C C1; said furrows D D1, because of the greater inclination of their bottom surfaces, being of greater depth at their deepest parts than said main furrows C C1.

Between the central recesses of the disks A A1 and the outer annular working faces thereof, are formed abrupt annular surfaces or shoulders E El, as shown in Figs. 6, 7 and S, and the said auxiliary furrows D D1 open into the said central recesses between said shoulders E El. Said auxiliary furrows D Dl form openings or spaces through which the material to be treated or acted upon by the disks passes from said central recesses to and between the working faces of said disks. The furrows D Dl in the two disks are generally alike, but as preferably constructed, differ somewhat from each other in the two disks, as will appear from the following:

Each of the furrows D is made by cutting perpendicularly into the face of the disk A along a line d, which is tangent to a circle of slightly less radius than the inner circumference or shoulder E at the inner edge of the working face of the disk, and by forming an oblique flat face d1 extending from a line d2 which coincides with the shallower edge of the furrow C, until it meets the lower edge of the shoulder formed along the line d. Said shoulder, indicated by the line d, extends across the inner end of the furrow C and terminates at the annular surface or shoulder E and is, by reason of the inclination of the bottom face of the groove, of tapered form; being deepest at the line of its intersection. with the surface E and extending to a point at its outer end, where it meets the line d2.

Each furrow D1 in the disk A1 is made by cutting pcrpendicularly into the face of said disk along a line d3 tangent to the inner circumference or shoulder E1 at the inner man gin of the working face of the disk and extending at an angle across the inner end of the furrow C1 into the face of the adjacent land B, and by forming an oblique surface d4 constituting the bottom of said furrow, which surface extends from a line di parallel with the abrupt shoulder of the next adjacent furrow Cl and extending to the lower edge or margin of said shoulder d3. Said shoulder di is of tapered form and of greatest depth where it meets the annular shoulder El. Dy this construction of the furrow D1 a narrow land portion d forming an extension of the land B on the disk A1, is formed between the trailing edge of said furrow and the leading edge of said furrow Cl.

By inspection of Fig. 6 it will be seen that the construction described in the inner or auxiliary furrows D D1, provides along the annular shoulders E E1 at the inner margins of the working faces of the disks, a series of spaces of considerable width into which the particles of the material being operated upon may enter in the passage of said particles from the central recesses into the space between the working faces of the disks. lt will be furthermore noted that the flat lands are relatively wider than the furrows and that they extend from points closely adjacent to the central recesses A2 to the margins of the disks and are of increasing width from their inner to their outer ends.

The operation of the grinding disks is as follows: The material operated upon will usually be cracked and cooked corn or hominy and the same will be fed in a moist condition into the central recess between the two disks. The operation will be the same, however, when the material consists of other cereals, cooked or uncooked. The material is fed through the eyes a to the central space between the disks formed beneath the bottoms of the recesses A2 and is thrown outwardly by centrifugal force and the articles thereof first enter the spaces forme by and between the inner or auxiliary furrows D D1 which, in the deeper portions thereof, afford spaces wide enough to receive the largest of said particles. As the particles of material pass outwardly along the inclined bottom surfaces ef said auxiliary furrows D D1, they are caught between the inclined bottom surfaces of the opposed furrows and are carried between the adjacent surfaces of the lands between said auxiliary furrows, whereby each particle is squeezed or compressed to form a flat flake. The flat flakes thus formed, in their outward radial movement, are carried into the main furrows C C1 and being caught between the inclined bottom surfaces of opposed furrows and between the opposed lands are squeezed, kneaded and rolled in such manner that they become spongy or porous in texture and assume the form of small, elongated flaky cylinders. These cylinders are carried outwardly be* tween the adjacent land surfaces until all moisture has been excluded or driven oil", and the material is discharged at the outer margins of the disks in a dry state. The change in the direction of the main furrows C C1 has the effect of retarding the outward progress of the particles of material so that they will remain a sufficiently long time un.- der the action of the lands to insure the drying thereof before they are discharged from between the disks.

The particles of cereal being treated, after f gradually to the planes of the lands.

being flattened, may cross' one or more furroWs and lands in their outward passage to the margins of the disks, during Which time. they are being rolled and dried. inasmuch, however, as the abrupt shoulders c of the furroWs are carried, in the rotation. of the disks, in advance of the inclined surfaces cl thereof, the crossing of said furrovvs by said rolled particles has no tendency to break up or disintegrate the latter, because While occupying said furrows they are acted upon only by the opposing inclined surfaces or bottoms of said furrovvs Which carry said rolled particles under moderate pressure Moreover, the Widening of the lands at their outer ends has the effect to subject the particles to a maximum rolling action, by Whicli the rolled particles are dried.

l claim as my invention 1.. A disk for the purpose set forth provided with a central eye and one side thereof with a Wide recess surrounding the eye and outside of said recess with an annular or skirt portion, alternate lands and main furroWs externling across said annular or skirt portion from points adjacent to said central recess to the periphery of the disk, said lands being made wide and increasing in width toward their outer ends, and auxiliary furroWs extending diagonally across the inner ends of the main furrows and opening into the said central recess, the leading edges of the main and auxiliary furroWs being formed with abrupt shoulders and the bottoms of said 4furrows being inclined toward their trailing1 edges Where they meet the leading edges ofthe lands.

2. A disk for the purpose set forth provided with a central eye and one side thereof with a Wide recess surrounding the eye and outside of said recess with an annular or skirt portion, 'alternate lands and main furrows extending across said annular or skirt portion from points adjacent to said central recess to the periphery of the disk, said lands being` made Wide and increasing in Width toward their outer ends, the leading edges of said main furroivs being formed With abrupt shoulders and the bottoms of said furrows being inclined toward their' trailing edges where they meot the leading edges of the lands, and auxiliary furrows extending diagonally across the inner ends of said main furrows, the leading edges of said auxiliary furrows being also shouldered and extending a distance diagonally across the inner ends of the trailing edges of said lands, the bottoms of said auxiliary furrows being likewise inclined toward their trailing edges Where they meet the leading edges of the lands and said auxiliary furrows being open throughout their Width to said recess.

3. A disk for the purpose set forth provided with a central eye and one side thereof with a Wide recess surrounding the eye and outside of said recess with an annular or skirt portion, alternate lands and main furroWs extending across said annular or skirt portion from points adjacent to said central recess to the periphery of the disk, and auxiliary furrows extending diagonally across the iijner ends of the main furrows and opening into the said central recess, the leading edges of the main and auxiliary furrows beingformed With abrupt shoulders and the bottoms of said furrows being inclined tovvard their trailing edges Where they meet the leading edges of the lands, said main furroWs being made of substantially uniform Width throughout their' length and deflected at their outer ends to retard the feed of the material and the lands being made of increasing Width toward their outer ends.

a. A pair of disks for the purpose set forth arranged in parallel planes with theirworking faces adjacent to each other and separated a small distance, said disks being provided With central eyes and formed on their adjacent or Working faces with central recesses surrounding said eyes and outside said recesses with annular or skirt portions, alternate lands and main furroWs extending across said annular or skirt portions from points adjacent to said central recesses to the peripheries of the disks, and auxiliary furroWs extending diagonally across the inner ends of the main furroWs, one edge of each of the main and auxiliary furrows being formed with an abrupt shoulder and the bottoms of said furrows being inclined toward their other edges Where they meet` the planes of the lands, said disks being designedv to be so relatively rotated that the shouldered edge of each of the main and auxiliary furrows of one disk is carried in advance of the inclined bottom thereof and approaches the shoulders of the furrovvs of the other disk from the land sides of said shoulders.

5. A pair of disks for the purpose set forth arranged in parallel planes with their Working faces adjacent to each other and separated a small distance, said disks being provided with central eyes and formed on their adjacent or working faces with central recesses surrounding said eyes and outside said recesses With annular or skirt portions, alternate lands and main furrowsextending across said annular or skirt portions from points adjacent to said central recesses to the peripheries of the disks, and auxiliary furrows extending diagonally across the inner ends of the main furrows, one edge of each of the main and auxiliary furrovvs being formed with an abrupt shoulder and the bottoms of said fui'rows being inclined toward their other edges where they meet the planes of the lands, said disks being designed to be so relatively rotated that the shouldered edge of each of the main and auxiliary fur-- rows of one disk is oaii'ied in advance of the inclined bottom thereof and approaches the shoulders of the fuii'ows of the other disk from the hind sides of said shouideis, the trailing ends of the auxiliary fuiI'oWs of one of said disks extending' u substzuitiui distance into the inner ends o1 said kinds.

In testimony, that I Claim the foregoing as my invention I :i'Hx my signature in tho presence of two Witnesses` this Mtb fil-(1y of May l0 A. D. 1907.

CHARLES H. RICHARDS /'Vitnesses GEQBGE R. WILKINS, A. Wi BUNNv

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2572373 *Jun 20, 1949Oct 23, 1951Julius NiethamerGrinding disk or pulverizer
US5362003 *Oct 29, 1993Nov 8, 1994Sunds Defibrator Industries AktiebolagRefining segment
EP0611599A1 Oct 12, 1993Aug 24, 1994Sunds Defibrator Industries AktiebolagRefining segment
EP2055338A1Oct 22, 2008May 6, 2009Smiths Medical ASD, Inc.PID coefficient adjustment for respiratory heater closed loop control
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD21D1/306