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Publication numberUS945149 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1910
Filing dateMar 6, 1909
Priority dateMar 6, 1909
Publication numberUS 945149 A, US 945149A, US-A-945149, US945149 A, US945149A
InventorsMark Anthony
Original AssigneeMark Anthony
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chair.
US 945149 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. ANTHONY.

APPLICATION FILED HA3. 8, 1909. 945, 149. Patented Jan. 4, 1910.

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M. ANTHONY.

CHAIR.

APPLIOATION rump MAB. s. 1900.

Patented Jan. 4, 1910.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

MARK ANTHONY, OF STREATOR, ILLINOIS.

CHAIR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 4, 1910.

Application filed March 6, 1909. Serial No. 481,648.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, MARK ANTHONY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Streator, in the county of Lasalle and State of Illinois, have invented a new and useful Chair, of which the following is a specification.

The present invention aims to improve generally the construction of chairs, and more specifically the construction of reclining chairs.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a chair which may be adjusted without the necessity of rising from the chair, means being provided at a point convenient to the hand of the occupant of the chair, whereby the back and seat thereof may be quickly and readily adjusted to practically any desired position without the necessity of rising, as before stated.

In attaining the object in View, the invention aims to utilize as simple a mechanism as can be employed to produce the result and such mechanism will presently be fully described and is clearly shown in the several figures of the drawings in which,

Figure 1 is a perspective View of a chair embodying the invention. Fig. 2 is a view in side elevation, partly in section of the chair showing the same folded and packed within a box or crate. Fig. 3 is a detail vertical sectional view showing the manner of mounting and the means for operating the oscillatory pawl element of the chair adjusting mechanism. Fig. 4 is a perspective View of one end of this pawl element, and,-Fig. 5 is a detail sectional view showing the pawl in normal position in full lines and in release position in dotted lines. Fig. 6 is a similar View showing a modified form of pawl element.

In the drawings, the chair is shown as comprising a body frame in which is adjustably mounted the seat and back of the chair and this body frame is comprised in part of four corner posts which are inclicated by the numeral 7. The corner posts at the front of the chair are connected by a front cross piece 8 and those at the rear of the chair by a similar cross piece 9, and cross pieces 10 connect the corner osts at corresponding sides of the said b0 y frame.

The usual arms 11 are supported upon the upper ends of the corner posts 7 at corresponding sides of the frame and are, as will be readi y understood, fixed with respect to this body frame.

As shown in Fig. l of the drawings, the seat of the chair is in the form of a rectangular frame the forward member of which is indicated by the numeral 12, the corres 0nding or rear member by 13, and the sides by the numeral 1 1, all of these members of the frame being in the form of strips of the proper dimensions.

The sides 14 of the seat frame rest upon the forward cross piece 8 of the body frame of the chair as is clearly shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings and in order to support said seat frame at its rear so as to hold the frame against dropping, the ends of the rear end member 13 of the seat frame are extended beyond the outer edges or sides of the side members 14 of the frame, as indicated by the numeral 15 and these projecting ends of the said member 13 work in grooves 16 formed in the inner or opposing faces or sides of the corresponding cross pieces 10 of the body frame of the chair, which pieces 10, as previously explained connect the corner posts 7 at the corresponding sides of the said body frame.

From the foregoing, it will be readily understood that the seat frame is slidable in a direction from front to rear of the said body frame of the chair. A cushion of the usual character is of course to be disposed upon the seat frame and it will be understood that this frame is to have a suitable supporting filling or web for preventing sagging of the cushion when disposed thereon.

Hinged to the rear of the seat frame is the back of the chair, this hinged connection being had between the rear end member 13 of the seat frame and the bottom or lowermost cleat 18 of the frame of the back, the back including also side members or stiles 19 and upper cleats 20 with intermediate cleats 21 located between the u )per and lower cleats 18 and 20. The back of the chair is limited in its rearward swinging movement by means of suitable rods 22 which at their forward ends are bent at right angles and pivoted, by means of suitable brackets 23, fixed upon the under side of one of the arms 11 of the chair frame, the arms extending rearwardly and having their rear ends bent inwardly at right angles as at 24;

and pivoted to the corresponding stile 19 of the back of the chair, brackets similar to-the brackets 23 being employed for this purpose.

The usual back cushion is to be disposed against the back of the chair as will be readily understood.

The means for holding the chair seat and back in adjusted position and for permitting of adjustment of these elements of the chair while the chair is occupied, will now be described.

The means mentioned above, consists commonly speaking, of rack plates carried by the chair seat and a pawl device carried by the body frame of the chair and the rack plates are indicated by the numeral 25 and are formed at their lower edges each with a plurality of rack teeth 26. Each of the plates 25 is formed, adjacent each end, with a vertically extending slot 27 and the plates are supported upon the inner side faces of the side members 14 of the seat frame by means of securing elements 28 which are engaged through the slots 27 and into the said side members of the seat frame, it being understood of course that the rack plates are in this manner so supported that they may have free upward movement either bodily or at either end and independently of the side members of the seat frame by which they are carried. The function of this feature of the invention will presently be fully explained.

In Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the drawings,

there is shown one form of pawl device for' cooperation with the rack plates just described and in these figures, the pawl devices illustrated as in the form of an angle bar one wing of which is indicated by the numeral 29 and the other by the numeral 30, the wing 30 at one end being extended beyond the wing 29 and being bent up and formed to afford a handle. The other end of the wing 30 is also extended beyond the corresponding wing 29 and is bent up at right angles to form an ear 32, there being a pivot bolt or stud 33 engaged through the ear 32 and a similar bolt or stud 84; engaged through the operating handle 31 adjacent the point of junction of the same with the wing 30, these pivot bolts or studs being threaded or otherwise secured in the cleats 10 of the body frame of the chair, it being understood of course that the angle bar is of a length substantially equal to the distance between the opposing or inner faces of the said cleats 10 and that by securing or mountin the bar in this manner, it is supported for oscillatory movement in a position transversely of the body frame of the chair. The angle bar is sobalanced and its wings 29' and 80 are so proportioned that normally the wing 30 is inclined slightly upwardly from front to rear whereas the wing 29 depends, the wing 29 extendingfroin the forward edge of the said wing 30. p

As is clearly shown in the several figures of the drawings, the angle bar assuming this position, normally, engages under normal conditions corresponding teeth of the two rack plates 25, this engagement being had between the teeth and the rear edge of the wing 30 of the angle bar.

In Fig. 5 of the drawings, the pawl or angle bar above described is shown in full lines in normal position and as heretofore explained, when in this position, the rear edge of its wing 30 is engaged by corresponding teeth of both rack plates 25 and insaid Fig. 5 of the drawings, the pawl is also shown in dotted lines in position to permit of adjustment of the seat from front to rear and when in this position, the lever 31, which projects upwardly through a slot 35 formed in the right or left hand cleat 10 of the chair body frame, is rocked rearwardly to lower the rear edge of the wing 30- of the pawl embodied in the angle bar and to present the edge or bend between its two wings to the teeth of the rack plate 25, it being understood that the teeth of the plate will readily ride over the bar when in this position and will thereby permit of adjustment of the seat of the chair without the necessity of the occupant thereof arising.

It will of course be understood that forward and rearward adjustment of the seat will result in adjustment of the back of the chair as regards its angle of inclination.

It will further be understood from the foregoing description that the seat frame does not lift as the teeth of the rack plate ride over the pawl but that these plates have relative movement with respect to the sides of the seat frame and that therefore the occupant of the chair is not put to the necessity of lifting the seat or in acking the frame forwardly or rearwardly, the only exertion required being that sufficient to rock the pawl.

In Fig. 6 of the drawings, there is shown another form of pawl device which may be employed in connection with the chair structure previously described including the rack plates 25 and in this figure of the drawing, the pawl plate is illustrated as in the form of a length of flat bar metal 36 which at each end is formed with an eccentrically positioned pivot stud 37, these studs being pivotally received in bearings 38 which are secured upon the opposing faces of the cleats 10 of the body frame of the chair, an operating handle 85 being secured to the bar 36 at one end thereof. Normally, that edge of the bar which is located nearest the line of extent of the pivot studs 37, and is indicated by the numeral 40, is engaged by the teeth of the rack plate 25 and it will be understood that by rocking this bar so as to elevate its opposite longitudinal edge, the before mentioned edge 40 will be lowered out of such engagement with the teeth and the teeth will be permitted to ride over the said opposite edge of the bar and the seat may then be adjusted to any desired position.

As shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings, the grooves 16 in which the projecting ends of the rear end 18 of the seat frame slide, are formed in the opposing or inner faces of the cleat 10 of the body frame of the chair and at the forward ends of said cleats 10, these grooves open downwardly through the lower edges of the said cleat as indicated by the numeral 41 and it will be observed upon inspection of said Fig. 2 of the drawing that by sliding the seat frame forwardly in the body frame until the projecting ends of the rear end cross piece 13 of the seat frame are at the forward end of the grooves 16 in the cleats 10, the rear end of the seat frame may then be dropped and the said seat frame and back may be folded to the position shown in said Fig. 2 of the drawings, in which position the back and seat will lie entirely within the height and depth dimensions of the body frame of the chair so that when the back and seat of the chair are so positioned, the entire chair may be packed in a substantially cubical box or crate and will then take up less room in shipping than does the ordinary Morris chair.

From the foregoing description of the invention it will be seen that there is provided, by the structure of the invention, a Morris chair in which the seat and back may be readily and quickly adjusted to suit the occupant of the chair and without the necessity of the occupant arising from the chair, and it will further be observed that little or no exertion is required to adjust the seat and back of the chair. Furthermore, it will be observed from Fig. 2 of the drawings, that there is provided a chair which may be packed in a substantially cubical or at least rectangular crate or box and will then take up considerably less room than the ordinary chair of this type being shipped.

lVhat is claimed is 1. In a chair, a frame, a seat slidable in the frame, a pawl mounted in the frame, means for rocking the pawl, a back connected with the seat and frame, rack plates, each of said plates being formed at each end with a slot, securing supporting elements engaged through the slots and holding the plates loosely to the seat, the plates resting normally in engagement with the pawl and being freely movable vertically.

2. In a chair, a frame, a seat slidable in the frame, a pawl mounted in the frame, means for rocking the pawl, a back connected with the seat and frame, rack plates, each of said plates being formed at each end with a slot, securing supporting elements engaged through the slots and holding the plates loosely to the seat, the plates resting normally in engagement with the pawl and being freely movable vertically, said pawl comprising an eccentrically mounted bar having one edge normally presented for positive engagement with the teeth of said rack plate.

3. In a chair, a frame, a seat slidable in the frame, pawl bar mounted eccentrically for rocking movement in the frame transversely thereof, said bar normally having one edge presented in a plane above an opposite edge, means for rocking the pawl, a back connected with the seat and frame, rack plates, each of said plates being formed at each end with a slot, securing supporting elements engaged through the slots and holding the plates loosely to the seat, the plates resting normally in engagement with the pawl bar and being freely movable vertically.

4. In a chair, a frame, a seat slidable in the frame, a pawl bar mounted eccentrically for rocking movement in the frame transversely thereof, said bar comprising angularly disposed wings, the bar being normally in position with the edge of one wing presented in a plane above the remainder of the bar, means for rocking the bar, a back connected with the seat and the frame, and rack members loosely resting in engagement with the pawl bar.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own, I have hereto affixed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

MARK ANTHONY. Witnesses S. M. PLUMLY, CARRIE I-I. ANTHONY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4222607 *Aug 23, 1978Sep 16, 1980The Dimmock Furniture Company LimitedSeating
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/03255