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Publication numberUS945177 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1910
Filing dateMay 15, 1908
Priority dateMay 15, 1908
Publication numberUS 945177 A, US 945177A, US-A-945177, US945177 A, US945177A
InventorsFrank M Levett
Original AssigneeFrank M Levett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Buffing or polishing wheel.
US 945177 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. M. LBVETT.

BUFFING OR POLISHING WHEEL.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 15, 1908.

945,177. Patented Jan.4,1910.

Attestf Inv ntor:

' ing or Polishing Wheels,

" view showing another UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FRANK M. LEVET'I, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

BUFFING 0R POLISHING WHEEL.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK M. LEVETT, a citizen of the United States, and resident of the city of New York, county of New York, and State of New York, tain new and useful Improvements in Buff- -of which the following is a. specification.

his invention relates to butting or polishing wheels made of cloth or other textile fabric and the objects of the invention are to provide butting or polishing wheels formed of a plurality of layers of ieces of cloth whichare sewed together on ines extending outward at different angles from at or near the center of the wheel so as to provide pockets which are adapted to receive and'hold a bufling composition such as rouge or other compound employed in buffing or polishing.

Further objects of the invention are to provide a bufiing or polishing wheel formed of a plurality of layers of cloth which are cut on the bias so that the eripheral edge of the wheel is not liable to ray or unravel, thus insuring the uniform wearing of the wheel.

Referring to the drawings: Figure 1 is a plan view of a strip of bias cut fabric from which the wheel is formed either by cutting the same into pieces or spirally winding the same into a. desired number of turns; Fig. 2 is a plan view of one of the pieces of fabric cut in the shape of a diskand showing one fornrof outward stitching; Fig. 3 is a plan form of outward stitching; Fig. 4 is a plan view showing a diskmade up of a plurality of keystone pieces of fabric, each of which are cut on the bias; this figure also shows another form of outward stitching; Fig. 5 is a planview of a strip of bias cut fabric to which is sewed a narrower strip of fabric similarly cut; Fig. 6 is a plan view of one of the strips shown in Fig. 5 made into a disk; Fig. 7 is a lan 'view of one of the strips of bias cut fabric shown in Fig. 5 bent into spiral form to make a plurality of Sn erposed disks; Fig. 8 is an end view of a bu ng wheel made up of. a plurality of disks of fabric secured together.

In the drawings, A designates a single piece of fabric cut in the form of a disk and B designates the outward stitching used in sewing a plurality of pieces A together so as to form pockets on the periphery of the Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed May 15,

have invented cer- Patented Jan. 4, 1910.

190a. Serial No. 432,999.

usually customaryto sew the pieces A together in sets of from two to four pieces and then to fasten a plurality of these sets together to form a buflin wheel as shown in Fig. 8. The lines of stitching may be made to coincide with each other so that the pockets formed on the peri )hery of the wheel will all be in line but lf deillttl the lines of stitches on the different sets of pieces may be spaced apart atdifi'erent intervals so as to distribute the pockets along1 the surface of the periphery of the bu 'ng wheel. As shown in Fig. 2 the stitches B are made on lines radiating from the center so as to form right angle pockets into which the polishing compound accumulates.

Instead of stitching the sets of pieces A on radial lines B, the same may also be stitched on the curved line C so that when the same is rotated in the direction of the arrow, the polishing material will be held in the pockets formed at the end of the stitching G on the periphery of the disk, but not to such an extent as is possible in radial stitching as shown in Fig. 2. This curved or tangent stitching prevents small objects, being polished, from catching in the pockets on the periphery of the wheel as often happens when the stitching is made as shown in Fig. 2. If on the contrary the pieces A in Fig. 3 are rotated in a direction opposite to the direction of the arrow, a great deal of polishing material is held in the pockets and this is very advantageous when it is desired to polish large objects which are not apt to catch in the pockets.

In Fig. 4 is shown a plurality of keystone pieces D fitted together and sewed as shown at E so as to form a pluralit .of ockets on the periphery of the disk, eac dis of ieces D bein overlapped as shown in dotte lines D in t e figure. The keystone pieces D are referably all cut from abias cut strip of abric as shown in Fig. 1 so that the peripheral edge of the disk is not liable to fray or unravel, thus insuring uniform wear of the disk.

Instead of making the disk A of a. plurality of keystone pieces D, the same may be made of a single strip of fabric F which is cut on the bias and gathered as shown in Fig. 6, to make a complete disk out of one iece. In order to make the disk of uniorm thickness on the inner and outer portions, a strip of similar material G is sewed pieces A adjacent the stitching- B. It is on the outer edge of the strip F so as to compensate for the extra thickness made at the center of the disk in gathering the fabric.

In order to make separate disks as shown in Fig. 6, the strip of fabric F may be wound spirally to the total thickness of the wheel as shown in Fig. 7.

In Fig. 6 the disk is sewed on the tangen tial lines H and in Fig. 7 the disk is sewed on the curved tangential lines J similar to that shown in Fig. 3, it being immaterial how many of these disks are sewed together, depending largely upon the kind of polishing for which the wheel is required.

The disks may all be sewed together by means of concentric rows of stitching so as to suitably hold the same together.

What I claim is A l. A-bufiing or olishing wheel made of strips of woven fa ric material, the strips being gathered or plaited around the hub or fcenter of the wheel, and filling strips 1 of woven material arranged on the outer portions of said other strips to compensate for the extra thickness caused by gathering.

2. A buflingor polishing wheel made of strips of Woven fabric material cut on the bias, said strips being gathered or plaited around the hub or center of the wheel and sewed on lines radiatin from the middle portion of said strips 0 woven fabric material to the outer edge thereof.

3. A bufling or polishing wheel made of woven fabric material, sewed oncurved lines radi'atin from the middle portion of said woven abric material to the outer edge thereofl In testimony whereofl have signed this specification in the presence of two subscrib-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2704916 *Jul 12, 1950Mar 29, 1955Osborn Mfg CoBuff construction
US5169293 *Jun 10, 1991Dec 8, 1992Inax CorporationEjector with high vacuum force in a vacuum chamber
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB24D13/08