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Publication numberUS950600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1910
Filing dateFeb 21, 1908
Priority dateFeb 21, 1908
Publication numberUS 950600 A, US 950600A, US-A-950600, US950600 A, US950600A
InventorsWard S Perry
Original AssigneeWard S Perry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reflecting-lamp.
US 950600 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. S. PERRY.

RBFLBOTING LAMP.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 21, 1909.

950,600, Patented Mar. 1,1910.

*' m.mmm. mm mm \FABD S. PERRY, OE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

BEFLEGTING-LAMP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 1, 1910.

Application filed lebruary 21, 1908. Serial No. 417,050.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, WARD S. PERRY, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of Chicago, county of Cook, and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Reflecting- Lamps; and I do hereby declare that the'following is a full, clear, and exact description of the same, reference being had to the ac companying drawings, and to the letters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

This invention relates to improvements in that class of reflecting lam s in which an electric or other light of relatively low candle power may be employed.

In practically all the reflecting lamps such as are used for automobile headlights and similar purposes a considerable portion of the light radiated from the burner or lamp is lost so far as its utilization for any effective purposes is concerned through failure of .thelrefiectors or refractors to concentrate all 5,tlie light in parallel rays formin I a forwardly directed beam of light. urtherm ore there has always been with lights of this kind a considerable loss owing to the fact that there is invariably a dark spot on the reflectorat the rear of the burner owing to the supporting means for the burner cutting oflt' certain rays of light that would otherwise fall upon the reflector. For these reasons electric searchlights on most auto mobiles, including practically all automobiles driven by explosive engines, have not been used and acetylene gas or gas of some other kind has usually been employed and in the few instances in which it has been attempted to employ electric search lights on such cars, it has been deemed necessary to use lamps of relatively high candle power necessitating the use of a large and expensive storage battery.

The object of this invention is to obviate the conditions hereinbefore recited and to enable an electric lamp of relatively low candle power to be employed for search-light purposes either for automobile lamps or for any of a related kind.

Itis also an object of the invention to afford a construction in which nearly all. the light from the lamp is directed straight ahead in parallel rays, thus utilizin those rays which have heretofore been lost y diffusion or in lines falling outside the reflector.

provided on said sleeve have been radiated from the lamp It is also an object of the invention to afford a construction in which the source of light may be adjusted accurately at the focus of the reflector or reflectors and in which nearly all of the rays of light emanating from the source are reflected or refracted to a-fiord a beam of parallel rays.

The invention consists in the matters hereinafter described and more fully pointed out and defined in the appended claims.

In the drawin s: Figure 1 is a central vertical section 0 a lamp and reflector and refractor embod ing my invention. Fig. 2 is an enlarged ongitudinal section of the ad'usting means for the lamp, Fig. 3 is an e arged section taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

In said drawings: A, indicates a parabolic reflector of metal or other suitable material and which is ordinarily held in position in the lamp frame by the engagement of its periphery with the frame in a familiar manner. Secured on the back of said reflector isa plate of sheet metal ('1, provided with a rearwardly directed sleeve a, which registers with a corresponding aperture through the center of the reflector and through which extends a longitudinally split or slitted sleeve b, which contains the conductors for the electric light B. Said sleeve, as shown, is provided on the outer side with a longitudinally slitted or split insulating shell 6, as shown in Fi 3, which fits closely in the sleeve (1, an threaded within the sleeve is an insulating stem or core 1), containing one of the conducting wires 1), which extends through said core in position to be engaged by one of the contacts for the lamp B, and the other conductor I), is electrically connected with the sleeve b, in any suitable manner. Said conductors, of course, are connected with any suitable source of current. Said sleeve and its non-conducting shell I), are adjustable through the sleeve a, at the rear of the refiector to adjust the lam B, exactly at the focus of the lens, and For the purpose of retaining the same in adjusted posit-ion a collar B, provided with a set screw' b, is a, and said sleeve a, being relatively thin, it may be readily pressed or sprung inwardly by the action of tlie st screwto firmly hold the sleeve 1, in

ace.

P Of course, with the lamp supported as shown, and described there would of necessity occur a dark spot at the center of the reflector and in addition, those rays of light falling normally outside the reflector would be of comparatively slight value in illumi nating. For the purpose .of utilizing all such rays and reducing as much as possible the dark spot in the center of thebeam I have provided a spherically concave rcflector C, which, as shown, is supported on the sleeve Z), by means of arms or rods 0, which extend from the periphery of said reflector inwardly. Said arms are engaged on a collar 0', provided with a set screw 03, whereby said reflector is adjustably su ported upon the sleeve 1), which cagries t c lamp B. The set screw 0', also serves to spring or force the sleeve together and firmly clamp the core in any adjustment and acts to prevent relative movement of the core and sleeves. The middle portion of the reflector Q, is cut away to afford an a erture in which is set the refracting lens 0 any suitable kind, as shown in Fig. 1, to direct the rays passing therethrough from the lamp into parallel rays.

The operation is as follows: The rays from the lamp B, fallin upon the parabolic reflector A, are reflected in parallel lines as is usual when the source of light is at the focus of the parabola. The dark spot at the center of the beam is occasioned of course, by the plug and sleeve with which the lamp is connected cutting off part of the rays. The spherically concaved reflector C, is also adjusted so that the source of light is at the center thereof and said reflector is positioned to intercept all the rays of light that would otherwise fall outside the parabolic reflector. Such rays of light are, of course, directed back to the parabolic r cflcctor and thence are again thrown out 1n parallel lines so that all the light from the source is thus utilized.

Of course, the diameter of the spherically concave reflector will not exceed the diameter of the dark spot in the parabolic reflector and should no retracting lens whatever be used, said reflector enables all the light to be utilized without increasing the dark spot that would, in any event, occur in the parabolic reflector. For the urpose of reducing to the smallest possibe size the dark or nonefiective )ortion of the reflector the retracting lens D, is secured in said 3 herical reflector in a position to receive t e light thercthrough directly opposite said dark spot and is so shaped that the focus thereof is also at the center of the lamp, so. that the light rays assing therethrough are refracted into parallel rays, as shown in Fig. 1. The principal axis of said lens coincides with the principal axis of the reflectors and said axis of the lens also passes through the light source.

Of course, owin to the construction described, in which a l the light from the rays is utilized, a source of much smaller candle power may be used than has heretofore been deemed practicable. In consequence an electric lamp of very small size may be employed, requiring the use of a comparatively 7 shown owinglto the facility with which the 8! source of li t can be adjusted relatively to the focus 0% its reflectors and owing also to the protection and economy of current consumption insured by this construction.

I do not purpose limiting this application 3:

for patent as to details as many changes mav be made without departing from the principles of this invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. A lamp embracing a parabolic reflector, 9:

a longitudinally slit met. lic sleeve extending thereinto, a source of light at the inner end of the sleeve in the reflector, means extending through the sleeve for supplying electrical current to the source of light, a 9:

relatively small concave reflector positioned on the sleeve on the opposite side of the source of light from the parabolic reflector and acting to concentrate ra s from said source that would otherwise fa 1 outside said 1| reflector thereupon, means for adjusting the small concave reflector relatively to the parabolic reflector and means for adjusting the sleeve to vary the position of the source of 2. A lamp embracing a parabolic reflector and a relatively small concave reflector oppositely disposed thereto, a metallic sleeve adjustably secured to the parabolic reflector,

a source of light secured to the end of the 1 sleeve at the principal focus of both reflectors, means for rigldl securin the sleeve in any adjustment to the parabo lic reflector, said concave reflector being positioned to reflect part of the rays normally falling out- 1 side of the parabolic reflector thereon and means for adjusting said concave reflector and said source relatively to the parabolic reflector.

3. A lamp embracing a parabolic reflector 1 and a spherically concave reflector positioned oppositely each other and with a common focus, concentric insulating and conducting sleeves adjustable with respect to one of the reflectors, a source of light at one end of the 1 sleeves and adjustable means supporting the other reflector, thereby adapting the same to be adjusted toward and from the. first named reflector.

4. In a device of the class described a 1 parabolic reflector provided with a central a erture, a short sleeve secured thereto in a inement with said aperture, sleeves adjustably secured to said short sleeve, a source of light secured to the adjustable sleeves in the parabolic reflector and a concave reflector adjustably sup orted on the,

inner end thereof, means for adjusting said adjustable sleeve to bring said source to the principal focus of the reflector, a small concave reflector supported on said adjustable sleeve oppositely from the parabolic reflector in position to concentrate part of the rays of light from said source normally falling outside said parabolic reflector thereupon. I

6. In a device of the class described a parabolic reflector having an aperture at its center, a relatively thin sleeve secured on the rear side of the reflector and registering with the aperture, an adjustable sleeve extending through said sleeve and aperture, a source of light at the inner end thereof, means for adjusting said adjustable sleeve to bring the light at the principal focus of the reflector, a small spherically concave re flector supported on said adjustable sleeve oppositely from the parabolic reflector, means for adjusting the same relatively to said source, said reflector having an aperture therethrough op osite said adjustable sleeve.

7. l lamp embracing a parabolic reflector having a central aperture therethrough, a relatively thin sleeve secured on the rear side of the reflector in register with said aperture, an insulated sleeve extending through said sleeve and aperture, an electric light at the inner end of said insulated sleeve, means for securing said insulated sleeve to hold said source of light at the principal focus of the reflector, a small. concave reflector adjustably secured on said insulated slecve'oppositely from the parabolic reflector and positioned to'rcflect to the parabolic reflector rays of light from said source normally falling outside said parabolic reflector.

8. A lamp embracing a parabolic reflector having a central aperture therein, a relatively thin metallic. sleeve secured on the rear side of the reflector, in register with said aperture, an adjustable insulated sleeve extending through said sleeve and aperture, a collar on said first named sleeve, a set screw therein to press said sleeve into binding engagement, with the insulated sleeve, :1 source of light at the inner end of said insulated sleeve, and thereby adapted for adjustment to the principal focus of the reflector, a small' spherically concave reflector adjustably su ported on said insulated sleeve, opposite t e parabolic reflector to interce t art of the rays from said :source norma y alling outside said parabolic reflector, said spherically concave reflect-or having a central aperture and a lens secured in said a erture.

9. In a device of the class escribed a parabolic reflector having an aperture through its center, a thin rearwardl directed sleeve secured on the back of t e reflector and registering with said aperture, an insulated adjustable sleeve extending through said reflector and sleeve, an electric li ht in the inner end thereof, means for rigi ly engaging said adjustable sleeve in any adjustment thereof, conductors for said light connected with a source of current, one extending through said insulated sleeve and the other electrically connected with the insulated sleeve, :1 small, centrally apertured concave reflector supported on the insulated sleeve to receive therein and reflect to the parabolic reflector light rays from the source normally falling outside the first named reflector and means for adjustably securing said reflector on said insulated sleeve.

10. In a lamp a parabolic and a small spherically concave reflector arranged oppositely, means for adjusting one of the same relatively to the other to a common focus, electrically conducting means extending into the parabolic reflector, means for adjustably securing the same between the reflectors, a source of light supplied by the electric conductors, "means for adjustably supporting onerof the reflectors on the conducting means, and a condensing lens secured in an aperture in the smaller reflector whereby practically all the light from said source is directed in a beam of parallel rays.

11. In a device of the class described a parabolic reflector, a source of light supported in front of the reflector, means supporting the source of light adapted for adjustment to vary the distance of the light rom the parabolic reflector, means for rigidly securing the supporting means in any adjustment and a small reflector oppositely disposed from the arabolic reflector and adjustably supporter on the means which supports the source of light.

12. In a device of the class described a parabolic reflector, a source of light, means for supporting said source of light in front of the reflector and adjustable to move the light toward or from the reflector, a reflector ad'ustably supported by said means proviced with a central aperture and a lens secured in said aperture in the reflector.

13. In a device of the class described a parabolic reflector, a source of light, means for supporting said source of light in front of the reflector and adjustable to move the light toward or from the reflector, a concave reflector adjustably supported by said supporting means and a lens secured to the concave reflector in axial alinement with the source of li ht providin an unobstructed passage for a l the rays 0 light at the center of the reflectors. I

14. In a device of the class described a re flector, a sleeve rigidly secured thereto slit longitudinally, an insulated sleeve adjustably en ged in said rigidsleeye and slit longitu inally a source of light secured to the insulated sleeve, said insulated sleeve adjustable to vary the distance of said light from the face of the reflector.

15. In a device of the class described a reflector, a sleeve ri 'dly secured thereto, an insulated sleeve :1 justably engaged in said rigid sleeve, :1 source of light secured to the insulated sleeve, said insulated sleeve adjustable to vary the-distance of said light from the face of the reflector, a small reflector having a central aperture, :1 lens secured in the central aperture in the reflector, arms secured to the reflector and a collar secured to the arms slidable on the insulated sleeve to vary the distance of the small reflector from the light and the first named refiector.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name. in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

C. W. Hume, K. E. HANNAH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3395272 *Aug 15, 1966Jul 30, 1968Thomas H. NiehollApparatus for controlling light rays
US3633022 *Dec 8, 1969Jan 4, 1972Knut Otto SassmanshausenLamp
US5331530 *Dec 2, 1992Jul 19, 1994Manfred ScholzOperating theatre lamp
US5651609 *Dec 6, 1994Jul 29, 1997Pelton; Bruce A.Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system
US6036342 *May 21, 1998Mar 14, 2000Koito Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Vehicle head lamp
DE3436237A1 *Oct 3, 1984Jul 25, 1985Tsuyama Mfg Co LtdLampe
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF21V17/02