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Publication numberUS960008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1910
Filing dateMar 30, 1910
Priority dateMar 30, 1910
Publication numberUS 960008 A, US 960008A, US-A-960008, US960008 A, US960008A
InventorsWilliam V Evans, Henry C Gordon
Original AssigneeWilliam V Evans, Henry C Gordon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil-can.
US 960008 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. V. EVANS 8: H. U. GORDON.

OIL GAN- APPLICATION FILED JUNE 21, 1907. RENEWED MAR. 30, 1910.

960,008. Patented May 31, 1910.

WITNESSES lNVENTORS m Mum/v v. EVA M3,. H6. 00500.

ATTORNEY ANDREW B. GRAHAM 1:0- PHOYO-LI'HOGRAFNERS. wAsmNsmN. n. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WILLIAM V. EVANS AND HENRY C. GORDON, OF SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA,

OIL-CAN.

Application filed June 21, 1907, Serial No. 380,185.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mav 31, 1910. Renewed March 30, 1910. Serial No. 552,412.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, WILLIAM V. EVANS and HENRY C. GORDON, citizens of the United States, residing at San Diego, in the county of San Diego, State OI California, (whose post-oifice address is San Diego, California,) have invented a new and useful Oil-Can, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention relates to improvements in oil cans in which a discharge stem is made'ln two separate parts, connected together, the one being larger in size and arranged so as to be supplied with a wlck, fabric or sponge extending from the oil in the can, or from the top of the oil can to the point of delivery; the same is intended to be used as a distributer or spreader of the oil, and by this means the oil can be evenly applied on any surface. The smaller discharge part of the oil can is so arranged as to act as a spout for inserting the oil into bearings or oil-cups. By applying the two discharges to the can it forms a combination which renders a great saving in oil when lubricating a large surface, such as saws, plates, planes, piston-rods, cross-head guides, et cetera. We attain these objects by the mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which,

Figure l is a vertical and sectional elevation of an oil can, showing the method of its construction. Fig. 2 is a top elevation of an oil can.

Similar letters refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

In Fig. 1, and Fig. 2, A is the oil can. B is the threaded connection of the top of oil can A, to which the lower end of the spout C is connected. D is the collar or rim of the lower part of the spout. E is a gasket which is clamped between the top of the threaded band B of the top of the oil can A, and the collar D so as to prevent the leakage of oil at the joint. F is the large discharge of the oil can spout, which contains the wick, fabric or sponge, shown by letter H. G are slotted grooves in the end of spout F, which are intended to act as springs on the wick, fabric or sponge, and at the same time can, if desired, be spread and formed into a bell-shaped holder thus allowing the wlck, fabric or sponge to spread into a larger surface. I is the hole through which the oil is admitted to the wick H. K is the small spout which passes through the large spout F at the center of the bend and curves in the opposite direction from spout F, so as to prevent it from interfering with the use of the latter, and is made fast at the part of the shell of the spout F to prevent it from leaking.

We claim,

1. An oil can consisting of a body, a curved spout secured at its inner end to said body, a similar spout passing through said first spout, being secured to the latter and having its inner end communicating with said can body, and a wick arranged in said first spout and surrounding said smaller spout.

2. An oil can composed of a body, a spout secured to said body, and a second spout of less diameter than said first spout having its inner end projected through one of the walls of the first spout so as to communicate with the interior of said body, and a wick in the first spout which surrounds the inner end of the second spout.

3. An oil can composed of a body having an oil opening, a spout having a wick therein communicating with said opening, and a second spout having one end arranged in the first spout and communicating with said opening, said opening providing an oil passage for each of the spouts.

4. An oil can composed of a body having an oil opening, a spout having its inner end communicating with said opening, a second spout having its inner end passed through said first spout to project in said oil opening and being secured to said first spout, the free ends of each of the spouts being curved in opposite directions.

WILLIAM V. EVANS. H. C. GORDON. Witnesses:

J. W. MOSHER, ADOLF BEYER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3161904 *Sep 9, 1963Dec 22, 1964Permalux CompanyLiquid dispenser
US4273459 *Nov 13, 1978Jun 16, 1981Hardy Pierre JSqueegee device for liquid dispensing bottle
US5364027 *Jan 16, 1992Nov 15, 1994Sara Lee/De N.V.Dispenser adapted for combined continuous and instant operation
US5846011 *Feb 7, 1997Dec 8, 1998Melvin BernsteinBottle with built-in telescoping applicator head and spout for applying fluid to a body
US5908256 *Jan 14, 1997Jun 1, 1999Bernstein; MelvinBottle with built-in telescoping applicator head and valve therein
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47L1/08