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Publication numberUS963049 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1910
Filing dateJan 2, 1906
Publication numberUS 963049 A, US 963049A, US-A-963049, US963049 A, US963049A
InventorsDavid T Kenney
Original AssigneeVacuum Cleaner Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for removing dust.
US 963049 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'D. T.K ENNBY. APPARATUS FOR REMOVING DUST. APPLIOATIIOE FILE]? JAN. 2. 1906.

Patented July 5, 1910.

times see. Inventor,

To all whom ill may concern:

- FT s Earn onto DAVID r. KENNEY, OF NORTH PLAINEIELD BOROUGH, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE vacuum CLEANER. COMPANY, A CORPORATION on NEW YORK.

APPARATUS FOR REMOVING DUST.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 5, 1910 Application filed January 2, 1906. Serial No. 294,941.

Be it known that I, DAVID T. KENNEY, a

citizen of the United States of America, and a resident of the borough of North Plainfield, county of Somerset, and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and, useful Improvements in Apparatus forRemoving Dust, of which the following is aspecification.

My invention relates to a hand-implement or cleaner to be used in connection with pneumatic dust-removing systems, such as are, for example, disclosed in my United States Letters Patent No. 739,263, granted September 15, 1903, wherein a vacuum system of dust removal is set forth.

The cleaner is designed especially for cleaning corrugated or uneven surfaces, such as the slatted floors of railway'cars, switchboards, etc.

In the acompanying sheet of drawings, which forms a part of this application, Figure 1 is a front view of one form of nozzle of a cleaner embodying my invention, the nozzle being broken away on the line I-I of Fig. 2. Fig. 2 is a section through the nozzle on the line II-II' of Fig. 1, the parts 1 being in position for cleaning a corrugated surface. Fig. 3 is a section through the nozzle on the line III-III of Fig. 1, the parts being in position for cleaning a plane surface. Fig. 1' is a front view of another form of nozzle embodying my invention on the line IV-IV of Fig. 5. Fig. 5 is a section through the nozzle on the line VV of Fig. 4, the parts being in position for cleaning a corrugated surface. Fig. 6 is a sectionthrough the nozzle on the same line, the parts being in position for cleaning a plane surface. Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a cleaner, the handle being broken away and the nozzle being that shownin'Fig. 1, the parts being in position for cleaning a corrugated surface. Fig. 8 is a similar perspectiveview with the parts in position for cleaning a plane surface.

The cleaner in the form shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3,7 and 8 comprises a tubular handle A through which the dust-laden-air isdrawn', and a suction-chamber or nozzle B which is coupled to the tubular handle. The nozzle The outer ends of the rigid projections illustrated as tubes '6 6, form the edge of the nozzle "along this surface, and the mouths s s of the tubes constitute dust-inlets into the suction-chamber. 4 These tubes are of such diameter and length and are set at such distances apart between centers and in such positions as the dimensions and spacing of the slats or corrugations on the surface to be cleaned require. There may be a second series of dust-inlets s s between the inner ends of the tubes. These inlets open directly into the suction-chamber so that when the cleaner is operated, for example, over a slat-covered floor (such a floor being indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 7), the series of dust-inlets at the outer ends of the tubes will come in contact with the floor between the slats, and the series of dust-inlets between the' inner ends of the tubes will come in contact with the tops of the slats.

In the form shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 the mouth of the nozzle is formed with projections along which there is a single continuous dust-inlet slot bounded by similarly serrated lips with their teeth in register, so'that the dust will be drawn in and the sides of the slats thereby cleaned, as Well as the tops of the slats and the floor between the slats. As there is also, usually, in the cars, a considerable amount of surface notslat-co-vered which requires cleaning, it is desirablethat a cleaner (intended for use in cars) should be so constructed as also to operate efficiently on plane surfaces. This is accomplished by a multiple-part construction of. the nozzle, which consists of parts having a movement with respect to each other whereby the ser rated nozzle is converted into a nozzle adapted for use on a plane surface. This is most simply eflected by making the nozzle in two the cleaner is applied to an ordinary floor or other plane surface the sleeve falls and its lower bounding edge constitutes the contact lips of theinlet slot, thereby formed.

Hooks h inwardly project from the sleeve and pins '9 g outwardly project from the body of the nozzle and prevent the sleeve vents the metal parts of the cleaner from striking and marring walls or other objects in the eventof the cleaner being forcibly driven against'them.

It will be observed that in one aspect the invention consists in a pneumatic tool,

wherein the relations of the several inlets may be changed to suit difierent conditions I of operation; and in another aspect, the invention consists in a pneumatic tool comprising a series of projections open at their ends and a mouth provided with contact lips and means whereby either the ends of the projections or the contact lips of the mouth may be brought into contact with the surface of the object'to which the tool is applied for cleaning. a

What I claim as, new and desire to secure I j by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a pneumatic cleaning tool, the combinatlon of a suctionchamber, a multiplicity of rigid downward projections from the suction chamber and bottom of the suction-chamber which pro-,

a broad nozzle having a slot in its bottom,

the slot being bounded by similarly serrated lips with their teethin register, substantially as described.

3. A pneumatic cleaning tool comprising a suctionchamber and rigid projections which provide passageways from their outer ends to the interior of the suction-chamber, and a sleeve surrounding the base of the slidably mounted thereon, its lower edges forming contact lips, substantially as described.

4. A pneumatic cleaning tool comprising a broad nozzle having a slot inits bottom, the slot being bounded by similarly serrated lips with their teeth in register, and a sleeve surrounding the base of the nozzle and slidably mounted thereon, its lower edges forming contact lips, substantially as described.

Signed by me at New York city, this 30th day of December, 1905.

DAVID T. V'KENNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3708824 *Jan 22, 1971Jan 9, 1973Holubinka SSuction-cleaning implement
US3745603 *May 10, 1971Jul 17, 1973Bayless FVacuum cleaner suction tool for cleaning deep pile shag rugs
US3745604 *Sep 3, 1971Jul 17, 1973Gen Signal CorpTool for cleaning and raking shag type rugs
US3771193 *Dec 23, 1971Nov 13, 1973Hageal NSuction cleaning nozzle for high pile rugs
US3800359 *May 3, 1972Apr 2, 1974Air Filters IncVacuum cleaner nozzle
US3816872 *Jan 19, 1973Jun 18, 1974Bayless FVacuum cleaner suction tool for cleaning deep pile shag rugs
US5652995 *Jul 28, 1995Aug 5, 1997Wci Outdoor Products, Inc.Nozzle for lawn and garden blower
US6381805 *Apr 19, 2000May 7, 2002Lyle E. MartinVacuum cleaning attachment tool
US7159274May 17, 2002Jan 9, 2007Freidell James EVacuum grooming tool
US8230819Jan 23, 2006Jul 31, 2012Hair Patrol LlcVacuum grooming tool
US8261407Sep 11, 2012Techtronic Floor Care Technology LimitedVacuum cleaner accessory tool
US8312594 *Jun 27, 2008Nov 20, 2012Nilfisk-Advance, Inc.Carpet cleaning wand having uniform air flow distribution
US8429790Apr 30, 2013Hair Patrol LlcVacuum grooming tool
US8732893Jul 28, 2012May 27, 2014Petgroom Tech LlcMethod for removing hair from a hand-held grooming tool
US8918955Apr 29, 2013Dec 30, 2014Petgroom Tech LlcVacuum grooming tool
US20020189049 *May 17, 2002Dec 19, 2002Freidell James E.Vacuum grooming tool
US20060118137 *Jan 23, 2006Jun 8, 2006Freidell James EVacuum grooming tool
US20090320234 *Dec 31, 2009Hydramaster North America, Inc.Carpet cleaning wand having uniform air flow distribution
US20110047744 *Sep 1, 2009Mar 3, 2011Bozzelli Robert FVacuum cleaner accessory tool
WO1997004700A1 *Jul 19, 1996Feb 13, 1997Wci Outdoor Products, Inc.Nozzle for lawn and garden blower
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/02