Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS969015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1910
Filing dateDec 13, 1909
Priority dateDec 13, 1909
Publication numberUS 969015 A, US 969015A, US-A-969015, US969015 A, US969015A
InventorsEdwin C Washburn
Original AssigneeEdwin C Washburn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Riser-lining for molding devices.
US 969015 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. G. WASHBURN.

RISER LINING POE MOLDING DEVICES. APPLICATION I'ILEI) M613, 1909.

969,015. Patented Aug. 30, 1910.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

Wbtnesaef 19 5 (lite 1M s .yjfx 3 E. G. WASHBURN.

RISER LINING FOR MOLDING DEVICES.

' APPLICATION rum) DEO.13, 1909.

EDWIN C. WASHBUBN, MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA.

,RISER-LIN-ING FOR MOLDING DEVICES.

Specification 6: Letterel'atent.

Patented Aug. 30, 1 910.

Application filed December 13, 1909. Serial No. 582,755.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, EDWIN O. WASHBURN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Minneapolis, in the county of Hennepin and State of Minnesota, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Riser- Linings for Molding Devices; and I do hereby declare the followin to be a full, clear, and exact descri tion 0 the invention, such as will enable ot ers skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention relates particularly to apparatus for molding large and heavy castings, and is directed to the provision of an improved riser, whereby certain improved results are obtained, and especially this invention is designed as an im rovement on the riser-lining disclose and claimed in my prior Patent, No. 900,970, of date October 13th, 1908.

The purpose of the riser-lining of the general 'haracte'r herein disclosed is fully set forth in the said prior patent, and may, therefore, be here briefly stated as follows: The so-called riser-lining of baked clay or other material, which will not be fused to any considerable extent by molten steel or other metal and which, furthermore, is a poor conductor of heat and, hence, will not cause chilling or rapid cooling of the metal in contact therewith, is placed in the riser chamber and is provided with a small passage through which the metal may flow from the main cavity of the mold into the cavity of the riser and vice versa, thereby leaving a very small neck, which may be easily broken, as a connection between the main body of the castin and the body of metal, which is permitte to harden in the riser chamber.

Several forms of the improved riser-lining are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like. characters indicate like'parts throughout the several views. Referring to thedrawings, Figure 1 is a vertical section taken through a metallic mol and showing my improved riser applie thereto, Fig. 2 1s a plan view of the parts shown In F1g. 1; and Figs. 3 to 9 in clusive are sectional 'views, showing modified constructions and arrangements of the riser-lining and its association with molds of different forms. The mold may, of course, be of any suitableform and may be of sand, orit may be a metal mold, such as used in casting ingots. Referrmg first to the construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the numeral 1 indicates a metallic mold provided with a supplemental o detachable rim section 2. The riser-lining 3, shown in said views (Fi 1 and 2), is

cup-shaped, rests in a suita le seat formed in the mold section 2 and is, as shown, provided with an inner c lindrlcal web or artition 4 that divides't e cavity of the riserlming into a central chamber 5 and a surrounding outer chamber 6. A downwardly flaring metal passage 7 opens through the bottom of the riser-lining 3 from the central chamber 5. The purpose of this downward flare or upward taper of the metal assage 7 will be hereinafter noted. Relativel small metal passages 8 open through the ottom of the riser-lining 3 from the outer chamber 6 and, as shown, these assages 8 lead also through ametallic rein orcing ring 9,which is embedded in the bottom of the said riserlining. In this arrangement of the riserlining, the central chamber 5 and the passage 7 are adapted to serve as a gate through which metal may be poured into the mold 1 as well as a riser permitting the metal to flow backward from the mold into the said chamber 5, and the outer chamber 6 serves as an auxiliary riser. Both chambers of the riser-lining are adapted to be closed by a two-part disk-like cover 10, having. a hole 11 that opens from the central chamber 5. At diametrically opposite points, the edges of the cover 10 are adapted to be inserted into segmental notches 12 formed in the upper side portions of the supplemental mold section 2, and the riserlining 3 itself is provided with diametrically opposite out- 1 turned flanges 13, that are also normally seated in the notches 12 so that the riserlinin is interlocked to said mold section 2 and, ence, held against accidental uplifting.

The molten metal, from which the castin is to be formed, is throu h the cover ho e 11, central chamber 5 an passage 7, and sufficientmetal is poured to com letely fill the mold and to partly fill the c embers 5 and 6. When the meta cools and contracts, a-supply of the molten metal mag flew back from the chambers 5 and 6 an compensate for shrinka and thus prevent flaws in the castin cured into the mol e cover 10, which is also preferably of baked 23. A disk-like cover 24,

clay or similar non-fusible heat-insulating material, prevents rapid radiation and cooling of the metal in the chambers 5 and 6.

After the casting is cooled, the riser-lining may be broken and then the metallic neck and w ich connect the main body of the casting with the residue left in the chambers 5 and 6, maybe easily broken off. The relatively small neck portions, formed in the passages 8, will be very easil broken and there will be little or no liabilit of making depressions in the main body -0 the casting by the breaking thereof from the casting. The relatively large neck portions 7 however, if broken directly from the main body of the casting, would be very likely to make a depression or imperfection in the surface thereof and, for this reason, it is made smaller at its upper end so that it will break primarily from the cast residue in the cen-' tral chamber 5 and may thereafter be readily ground down to the surface'of the body of the casting.

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 3, the riser-lining 14 is cup or pot shaped, has a downwardly flaring central metallic passage 15 and an out projectin anchoring flange 16 at its upper edge, wluch latter is embedded in the sand of a mold 17 so that the riser-lining will be anchored in the sand. In this view, the numeral 18 indicates the body of the casting and 18 the metal which is hardened in the riser. The numeral 19 indicates the metal which is hardened in the gate of the mold, the riser proper in the illustrated arrangement being distinct features.

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 4, the riser-lining 20 is an upwardly extended cylindrical flange that is spaced apart from the wall of the riser, so as to form an air chamber 21 in the said riser surrounding the lining. The disk-like bottom of the riser is extended and anchored in the sand 22 of the mold and, at its central portion, is provided with a downwardly flarin metal passage aving a central metal passage 25, is placed on top of the cylindrical flange of the riser 20 and is seated in the sand 22.

The construction illustrated in Fig. 5 is identical with that shown in Fig. 4;, except that the projecting portion of the bottom of the riser mm 20 is rovided with a multiplicity of Sma meta passages 26, that lead downward from the air chamber 21 so that the molten metal may rise from the mold into the said chamber 21.

In Fig. 6, the riser-linin 27 is formed with outwardly bulging wa s that anchor the same in the sand 28 of the-mold, and, at its bottom, the said lining is provided with a downwardly flaring metal passage 29.

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 7

ortions, cast in the passages 7 and 8 the riser-lining 30 is formed with inwardly bulging walls that anchor the same in the sand 31 of the mold, and, at its bottom, the said lining is provided with a downwardly flaring metal passage 32.

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 8, a metal mold 1 is provided with a detachable upper end section 2" (which parts 1 and 2 correspond to the parts 1' and 2 of the construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2), and the cup or pot shaped riser-lining 33 is fitted in said section 2 and, at its bottom, is provided with a downwardly flaring metal passage 34.

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 9, the riser-lining is in the form of a simple or plain disk 35, which fits in a shouldered upper portion or riser section of a mold 36.

This disk-like body 35 is provided with a reinforcing metal ring 37 .embedded therein and, at its central portion, it is formed with a downwardly flaring metal passage 38.

By reference to Fig. 1 it will be noted that when metal is poured into the metal receiving chamber 5 and flows into the mold through the flow-hole .7 the air will find an independent escape through the vent hole 8 and outer chamber 6. In practice, this important discovery has been made, to wit, that the metal in cooling will pull apart or sever the small neck which is cast within the flowhole 7 thus leaving'the large slu which is cast within the chamber 5 compI connected from the ingot or main casting within the mold. This seems to be due to the fact, first, that the metal inthe mold and within the metal receiving or overflow chamber 5 will become quite hard at a time when the metal in the neck 7 has not solidified S0 as to have much of any strength, and, second, it is due to the fact that the riser lining or bottom is so anchored or fixed in respect to the mold that it cannot move toward the moldto compensate for the shrinkage of the metal.

The term riser is herein used for the sake of convenience, but, of course, .it will be understood that the mold device may be applied at any and all places where molten metal is to be run into a mold, and the illustrations above given make it clear. that the etely dis-' the mold, of a riser-lining having a multiplicity of chambers and said chambers having metal passages opening into the mold.

3. The combination with a molding apparatus having a riser or gate opening into the mold, of a riser-lining having a multiplicity of chambers and passages opening into the mold, and a cover for said riser arranged to close the said chambers.

4. The combination with a molding apparatus having a riser or gate opening into the mold, of a riser-lining constructed of brittle non-fusible material and having embedded therein metallic reinforcement.

5. The combination with a molding apparatus having a riser or gate opening into the mold of a riser lining or bottom having a reinforcingrib around the opening from the riser into the mold.

6. The combination with a molding appa ratus having a riser or gate opening into the mold of a riser lining or bottom of non-fusible material having an upwardly tapered flow hole and a reinforcing ribaround said flow hole.

7. The combination with a mold appa-- ratus having a riser or gate opening into the mold, of ariser lining or bottom having an anchoring flan e and thin plate like bottom with a rein orcement around an upwardly tapered flow hole through its bottom.

8. A device for casting ingots having a mold cavity and a metal feeding reservoir formed with a seat resting upon and fitting over the upper portion of the said mold device and provided with a non-fusible bottom having a flow'passage opening into the mold cavity. v

9. The combination wit-h a molding apparatus having a riser or gate opening into the mold, of a riser lining constructed of nonfusible material and having a reinforcement of different material embedded therein.

10. The combination with a mold apparatus having a riser or gate opening into the mold, of a riser lining having a metal feed: ing entrance to the mold, and one or more other chambers having air exhaust vents from the mold.

In testimonywhereof I afiix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

EDWIN C. WASHBURN.

Witnesses:

MARIE E. LA PALME, HARRY D. KILGORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2431879 *May 22, 1945Dec 2, 1947Carnegie Illinois Steel CorpApparatus for casting steel rolls
US2765505 *Jun 3, 1952Oct 9, 1956Griffin Wheel CoForming riser openings
US2811757 *Jan 11, 1956Nov 5, 1957Thompson Prod IncCentrifugal casting
US4141406 *Aug 10, 1977Feb 27, 1979Foseco Trading Ag.Breaker cores
US4200142 *Jul 31, 1978Apr 29, 1980Lange Richard LRiser neck for molding castings
US6209617 *Nov 4, 1997Apr 3, 2001American Metal Chemical CorporationSealing riser sleeve
US6349757Apr 20, 2000Feb 26, 2002American Metal Chemical CorporationMethod of sealing using a riser sleeve
US6352100Apr 20, 2000Mar 5, 2002American Metal Chemical CorporationSealing riser sleeve
US6640874Feb 22, 2002Nov 4, 2003American Metal Chemical CorporationSealing riser sleeve
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB22C9/088