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Publication numberUS972439 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1910
Filing dateJun 20, 1910
Publication numberUS 972439 A, US 972439A, US-A-972439, US972439 A, US972439A
InventorsWilliam F. Cutler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment-hanger.
US 972439 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. F. CUTLER. GARMENT HANGER.

APPLICATION nun JUNE 20, 1910.

972,439. I Patented Oct. 11, 1910.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

1 INVENTOR W. W y 4 gzlaorf ATTORNEY W. F. CUTLER.

GARMENT HANGER. APPLICATION FILED JUNE 20, 1910.

972,439, Patented Oct. 11,1910.

2 SHEBTS-BHEET 2.

rit" w WITNES8S By gwqeu i ATTORNEY WILLIAM F. CUTLER, OF SUFFERN, NEW YORK.

GARMENT HANGER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 11, 1910.

Application filed June 20, 1910. Serial No. 567,819.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, VILLIAM F. CUTLER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Suflern, in the county of Rockland and State of New York, have made and invented certain new and useful Improvements in Garment-Hangers, of which the following is.

a specification.

My invention relates to an improvement in garment hangers, upon which, for instance, a coat, vest, and trousers, or other garments, may be hung or suspended, the object of the same being to provide an article of this kind which while adapted to be suspended in any convenient place, is more especially designed for use in sleeping cars, and so constructed and assembled that the one hanger may be used either for the upper or lower berth.

A further object of my invention is to provide an article of this kind, made entirely of metal, which shall be neat and finished in appearance, durable and efficient in use, and which may be produced at a small cost.

A further object of the invention is to so construct the article that it may be folded in asmall compass, and thereby occupy but a small amount of space when not in use.

. A further object of the invention is to so construct the hanger that vthe trousers will be hung or suspended from the waist band, and also from the lower ends thereof, whereby to prevent the contents from falling or dropping out of the pockets, andwith these and other ends in view, consists in certain novel features of construction and combinations of parts as will be hereinafter fully described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a view in front elevation of my improved hanger in its open adjustment. Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a view in side elevation, showing in dotted lines the hanger in its folded adjustment. Fig. 4 is a View in vertical section through one of the clips, taken on the line 4 -4 of Fig. 1, and having the trousers inserted therein. Fig. 45 is a view in perspective of the upper supporting frame. Fig. 5 is a view showing the hanger in dotted lines, and a coat and trousers hung or suspended thereon, opposite the upper berth, and the hanger supporting a pair of trousers opposite the lower berth. Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view of the hanger suspended opposite the lower berth from the front rail of the upper berth, a pair of trousers being hung thereon.

By reference to the drawings, it will be seen that the hanger comprises an upper supporting frame consisting of arms 10 and 11, the free end of the latter being secured to the former as illustrated at 12. These arms are slightly separated and bent into the loops 13, and then converged and bent to form the loop 14. The wire forming the arm 10 is bent to form a supporting hook 37, the shape or outline of which is clearly illustrated in Figs. 3 and 6, that is the wire is bent backwardly as at 15, in order to accommodate the collar of the coat to be suspended on the hanger, and preserve its shape, the wire being then bent upwardly as at 16, and over into hook form as at 17, this form of hook being adapted to properly suspend the garment hanger from the rod (not shown) near the ceiling of the sleeping car, and from which rod the curtains are also usually hung. The wire is then bent to form the arms 18 and 19, loops 20, and the loop 21, this portion of the frame being preferably formed of one continuous piece of wire, the arms 18 and 19 being slightly separated at their outer ends where they form the loops 20, as in the case of the arms 10 and 11, the free end of the arm 19 being secured to the arm 18, as illustrated at 22. This upper frame, formed of a single continuous piece of wire, is adapted to support a coat, or coat and vest, or like garment, as illustrated in Fig. f the drawings, and for the support of the trousers, I secure to this frame the bar 23. this bar being wrapped or twisted around the loops 14 and 21, as illustrated in Fig. 2, the free ends of this bar or wire forming the spring arms 2+l21 for the support of the lower ends of the trousers as hereinafter described. From the bar or rod 23 and near the ends thereof where the same are twisted around the loops 14: and 21, are suspended the spring clips 2525, comprising the supporting arms or straps 2626, and the spring-actuated arms 2727, the arms 26 being connected by the bar orstrap 28, against. which the ends 01 the springactuated arms 27 impinge. The arms 26 are preferably slitted as shown in dotted lines, Fig. l, and the metal between said slits punched inwardly to form the tongues 29, in order to assist in retaining the trousers in the clips, as clearly illustrated in the sectional view, Fig. 4.

In suspending the clothing from the garment hanger, the coat and vest are placed over the upper supporting frame, as illustrated in Figs. 5 and (3, that is, over the arms 10 and 11, and 18 and 19, the coat collar fitting nicely within the hook formed integral with the frame. The waist band 30 of the trousers 31 is then inserted in the clips 25, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 4 and 6 of the drawings. The trousers are then folded and the lower ends thereof inserted between the spring arms 24 and rod 23, as illustrated in Fig. 6, and also in the lower portion of Fig.

5, thus so supporting the trousers that they will occupy but little space, and at the same time prevent the contents of the pockets from falling out of the same.

To adapt the hanger to be used in connection with the upper or lower berth, I secure to the cross bar 33 of the hook a leather or other flexible strap 34, this strap being preferably buttoned or otherwise removably secured to the hook, the upper end of the strap being provided with a rigid book 35, whereby to suspend the hanger over the front rail 36 of the upper berth. In case the hanger is to be used in connection with the upper berth, the hook 37 of the upper supporting frame may be passed over the curtain rod 38 and the hanger suspended therefrom, as illustrated in Fig. 5, and in the event the hanger is to be used in connection with the lower berth, the hook 35 is passed over and upon the front rail 36 of the upper berth, the hanger being suspended opposite the lower berth, as illustrated in the lower portion of Fig. 5, the flexible strap 34: preventing the scratching or marring of the rail.

When not in use, and during transportation or storage, the hanger may be folded as illustrated in Fig. 3, that is, the lower supporting frame, comprisingthe spring clips, may be swung backwardly on the rod 23 and until the strap or plate 28 springs under the hook 37, the latter thereby retaining the hanger in its folded adjustment as illustrated in dotted lines, Fig. 3.

While I have described my hanger as designed for use in connection with sleeping cars, it will of course be understood that the same is equally well adapted for use in other places where the same may be conveniently hung from some suitable support. It will also be understood from the foregoing, that the hanger being made entirely of metal, may be polished, nickel plated, or otherwise ornamented, to present a neat and finished appearance, and that consisting of but few parts, may be cheaply and economically constructed and assembled.

Vhat 1 claim is:

1. An article of the character described consisting of an upper frame adapted to support a coat or like garment thereon, and formed of a continuous piece of wire, and a lower supporting frame secured to said upper frame and provided with spring clips for engagement with the waist band of a pair of trousers, and with springarms for engagement with the lower ends of said trousers, substantially as described.

2. An article of the character described comprising an upper frame formed of a single continuous piece of wire bent to form separated supporting arms and a supporting hook, a bar or rod connecting the arms of said upper supporting frame and formed with spring arms for engagement with the lower ends of the trousers, and a lower supporting frame movably hung from said bar and provided with spring clips for engagement with the waist band of the trousers, substantially as described.

3. An article of the character described comprising an upper frame for supporting a coat or like garment, and formed from a single continuous piece of wire bent to form a hook, and arms extending outwardly therefrom, each of said arms being formedof two strands of wire diverging toward their outer ends,a bar formed of a single piece of wire and connecting said arms, the free ends of said bar being bent to form spring arms for engagement with the lower ends of the trousers, and a lower supporting frame swung on said rod and formed with springactuated clips connected at their lower ends by a plate, and which clips are adapted to engage and support the waist band of the trousers, said plate adapted to engage with said hook when the hanger is in its folded adjustment.

4. An article of the character described comprising an upper supporting frame formed of a single continuous piece of wire bent to form a retaining hook, and arms extending outwardly therefrom, each of the arms comprising two strands of wire diverging toward their outer ends, the free end of each strand being tightly secured to the other strand, a bar or rod connecting these arms, the free ends of said bar being bent inwardly toward each other to form spring arms, and spring clips movably suspended at their upper ends from said bar, the lower ends of said clips being connected by a plate, said plate adapted to engage with said hook on the upper supporting frame to retain the hanger in its folded adjustment.

5. An article of the character described constructed with an upper frame for supporting a coat or like garment and provided with a hook, a bar connected with said uphattan, in the county of New York, and per frame and provided with spring fin ers, State of New York, this 16th day of June, 10 a. lower swinging frame suspended rom A. D. 1910.

said bar and a flexible strap connected at v 5 its lower end with said hook, andprovided WILLIAM CUTLER at its upper end with a rigid hook, substan- Witnesses: tially as described. A. V. WALSH,

Signed at New York, borough of Man- H. WHITE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2562368 *Dec 29, 1945Jul 31, 1951Nelson Herbert JGarment hanger
US3727272 *Oct 15, 1970Apr 17, 1973P RhodesFlexible material holding device
US4984721 *Sep 7, 1989Jan 15, 1991E.R.A. Display Co. Ltd.Garment hanger
Classifications
International ClassificationA47G25/48
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/485
European ClassificationA47G25/48C2