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Publication numberUS974294 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1910
Filing dateMar 25, 1910
Priority dateMar 25, 1910
Publication numberUS 974294 A, US 974294A, US-A-974294, US974294 A, US974294A
InventorsEdmund Morse Pond
Original AssigneeEdmund Morse Pond
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical bandage.
US 974294 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. M. POND.

SURGICAL BANDAGE. APPLIo'ATIoN HLED enum, 190e. nmmwnn un. sa. mo.

974,294. Patented Nov. 1, 1910.y

UNITED sTATns PATENT oFFIoE.

EDMUND MORSE POND, OF RUTLAND, VERMONT.

SURGICAL IBANDAGE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 1, 1910.

Application filed September 16, 1908, Serial No. 453,247. Renewed March 25, 1910. Serial No. 551,583.

'To all whom 'it may concern:

Be it known that I, EDMUND MORSE IoND, a citizen of the United States of America, and a resident of Rutland, county of Rutland, State of Vermont, have invented certain new and useful Im rovements in Surgical Bandages, of whic the following is a specification.

`My invention relates to a composition of materials useful for a variety of purposes.

It comprises a mixture of gelatin and glycerin with a core of woven fabric, fine w1re cloth, gauze or other textile material, and a waterproof backing, particularly suitable for use as a surgical bandage or dressing.

I find that by varying the proportions of the gelatin-glycerin mixture, I can pro duce compositlons of varying degrees of hardness which would o erate in correspondingly different ways as esired when applied to wound or to the surface of the patients bo y.

The best form of structure embodying my invention and certain modifications are illustrated in the accompanying sheet of drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a detail view of a specimen of my material with parts broken away to show the woven fabric. Fig. 2 shows in cross section a form useful as a surgical bandage or dressing. Fig. 3 shows a similar form in `which wire cloth is used. Fig. 4 shows a modified form in which a major portion of the gelatin-glycerin compound is on one side only of the fabric.

Throughout the drawings like reference figures indicate like arts.

1 is the mixture o gelatin and glycerin, and 2 is the core of woven material (see Fig. 1). V l

As shown in Fig. 2tl1e structure of Fi l has an. outer covering 9 of thin india rub er or other Waterproof material which does not s howin Fig. 1.

In Fig. 3, a core of wire cloth 8 is substituted for the core 2 of ordinary gauze or other textile material shown in Fig. 1. The wire cloth serves the purpose of a splint for fixation and produces a combined surgical dressing and splint. The gelatin-glycerin compound is slowly absorbed by t e flesh of the patient and 1s beneficial in its action.

While the best results for most puiposes are secured by embedding the woven abrio in the compound, it may be advisable 1n some cases to have a major portion of the gelatin-glycerin compound on one side only of the fabric, as shown in Fig. 4. The gauze or other Woven material gives strength to the fabric, and if of textile material, its absorbent properties enable it to take up some of the other materials and give permanency of form to the whole structure.

Of course any desired medication may be used with the gelatin-glycerin compound. The combiningof gelatin and gl cerin making it possible to vary the har ness of the compound as above stated, of course varies its resistance to liquefaction by the heat and moisture of the human body so as to produce a variety of medicinal effects.

In use the heat and moisture of the body melt and liquefy the compound according to its degree of hardness, and the waterproof backino' preventing its escape in a direction away from the surface of the wound, itis held in contact therewith. The' meshes of the gauze also tend to hold the liquid or semi-liquid material in contact with the skin by which it is slowly absorbed. The

elatin-glycerin composition by reason of lts predetermined degree of hardness dissolves slowly so that prolon ed medication is obtained. A more rapi absorption if desired is produced by making the material more liquid, that is by increasin the percentage of glycerin until as hig as 80% glycerin to 20% gelatin may be attained. The gauze also exerts a restraining action in the tendency of the material to flow when melting, holding the same by capillary attraction and mechanical obstruction. If the gauze were not used the material would run much more rapidly and could not be held in contact with the wound so lon The auze also performs an important unction 1n enabling the completed structure to hold its form and transportation so that it can be marketed successfully. If it were not for the gauze the ordinary glycerin-gelatin compound would tend to melt and run when subjected to ordinary high atmospheric temperatures.

In using the forms shown in Fio. 3, the wire cloth has the necessary stiness to serve as a splint in the case of application to an ordinary fracture such as a fractured wrist. The glycerin-gelatin composition has its medical action in reducingV inflammation and is absorbed b the flesh to the benefit of the patient, t ese materials, being of animal origin, really acting as a flesh food. In case of a fracture with an open Wound, the material could be perforated as shown in my application No. 398,796, filed Oct. 23, 1897, thereby supplying the necessary draina e and producing the other eHects set forth 1n my said prior application.

The form shown in Fig. 4 has the advantage of greatest indestructibility in transportation, the gelatin-glycerin composition being nearly all protected by the Waterproof backing on one Side and the gauze facing on the other. This form could be used Where the slow dissolution of the compound was desired, producing prolonged but not rapid action of the compound on the flesh.

My improved surgical dressing mayA also be used for skin diseases or as a blister. It may be employed to produce absorption of drugs to underlying organs, such as enlarged glands of the neck. In such case the composition might be impregnated With iodin which would penetrate through the flesh and reach the gland, destroying infection thereof and aiding the recovery of normal conditions. It can be used as a dressing for.

rheumatism by combining with it salicylic acid or its compounds. It can be applied to treat bronchial and other chest diseases.

Having, therefore, described my invention, I claim:

l. A surgical bandage and dressing com` prising in combination a textile fabric, a`

body of material readily soluble in Water at vthe normal temperature of the human body,

in Which the textile fabric is embedded, and a Water-tight backing vof Waterproof material. Y

2. A surgical bandage and dressing comprising in combination a textile fabric, a readily soluble composition of glycerin and gelatin in Which the textile fabric is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of Waterproof material.

3. A surgical bandage and dressing com-y prising in combination a textile fabric, a readily soluble composition of 7 5 parts glycerin and 25 parts gelatin in Which the textile fabric is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of Waterproof material.

4.. A surgical bandage and dressing comprising in combination a section of `Wire cloth, a body of material readily soluble in -Water at the normal temperature of the human body, in which the wire cloth is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of waterproof material.

5j A surgical bandage and dressin comprising in combination a section o Wire cloth, a readily soluble composition of glycerin and gelatin `in which the Wire cloth is embedded, anda Water-tight backing vof -Waterproof material. Y

6. A surgical bandage and dressing comprising in combination a sec-tion of Wire cloth, a composition of 75 parts glycerin and 25 parts gelatin in which the Wire cloth is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of Waterproof material. 7. A surgical bandage and dressing comprising in combination an open mesh textile fabric, a body of material readily soluble in Water at the normal temperature of the human body in which the textile fabric is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of Waterproof material, the textile fabric being adjacent to the surface of said body of material opposite from that to which the Waterproof backing is applied.

8. A surgical bandage and dressing comprising in combination an open mesh textile fabric, a readily soluble composition of glycerin and gelatin in which the textile fabric is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of Waterproof material, the textile fabric being adjacent to the surface of the composition opposite from that to which the Waterproof backing is applied.

9. A surgical bandage and 'dressing comprising in combination an open mesh textile fabric, a composition of75 parts glycerin and 25 parts gelatin in which the textile fabric is embedded, and a Water-tight backing of Waterproof material, the textile fabric being adjacent to the surface of the composition opposite from that to Which the Waterproof backing is applied.

Signed at New York, N. Y., this 15th day of Sept., 1908.

EDMUND MORSE POND. Witnesses: A. PARKER SMITH,

M. G. CRAWFORD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2464755 *Jul 9, 1946Mar 15, 1949Vodol CompanyCoated gauze
US2868193 *Jan 18, 1954Jan 13, 1959Aram TashjianEmergency splint compress
US4617921 *Jan 25, 1985Oct 21, 1986Seeler C OliverThermally actuated immobilizing structure
US5158555 *Apr 6, 1990Oct 27, 1992Porzilli Louis BHeal fast wound protection system with perforations
US5795584 *Feb 7, 1995Aug 18, 1998United States Surgical CorporationPost-surgical anti-adhesion device
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/8405, A61L2300/404