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Publication numberUS979858 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1910
Filing dateOct 15, 1909
Priority dateOct 15, 1909
Publication numberUS 979858 A, US 979858A, US-A-979858, US979858 A, US979858A
InventorsWilliam Hotze
Original AssigneeWilliam Hotze
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photographer's tray.
US 979858 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. HOTZE.

Patented Dec.27, 1910.

UNITED STATES PATENT onrron.

WILLIAM HOTZE, OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.

PHOTOGRAPHERS TRAY.

T 0 all whom it may concern Be it known that I, VVILLIAM Home, a citizen of the United States of America, residing in the city of St. Louis and State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Photographers Trays, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming part of this specification.

My invention relates to a photographers tray for use in developing and fixing photographic plates or films, and also for use in toning and fixing photographic prints, the invention having for its object the production of a tray that may be readily rocked in order that in placing the photographic obj ects to be treated in one section of the tray and the solution or treating agent in the other section of the tray, a treating agent may and will flow onto the photographic object and return to the section in which it is first placed. The tray, therefore, provides for the photographic object being sub jected to an even flow of treating agent which is alternately transferred to the sec tion or compartment in which the photo graphic object is located and then returned to the other section or compartment of the tray.

Figure I is a perspective view of my improved rocking tray. Fig. II is a longitudinal section through the tray.

In the accompanying drawings :1 designates the side walls and 2 and 3 the end walls of my tray. The side walls are of approximately L-shape, so that one end portion of the tray, partially closed by the end wall 2, lies in one plane, while the other end portion of the tray, partially closed by the end wall 3, occupies an angle relative to the first mentioned end portion.

4 designates the bottom of the tray that connects the several side and end walls and the general contour of which is similar to the shape of the side walls of the tray; or, in other words, the bottom is of approximately L-shape in longitudinal section. At the point where the two end sections of the tray merge into each other, the bottom 4 is of plane form at its upper surface. The upper surface of the bottom is provided in each end portion or section ofthe tray with corrugations 5 that extend transversely of the tray, and interposed in the corrugations, nearest the flat portion of the bottom at Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed October 15, 1909.

Patented Dec. 27, 1910.

Serial No. 522,702.

which the sections merge with each other are plane surfaces 6 intermediate of the sides, which merge into the previously mentioned fiat portion at the junction of the tray sections. Between the plane portion 6 and the ends of the tray sections are corrugations thatextend transversely of and the full width of the tray, and are of service in permitting of the photographic objects being readily engaged by a persons fingers to lift them.

The purpose of the plane surfaces 6 in the tray, forming the subject matter of this application is to permit of the photographic prints or plates treated in the tray lying in such fiat position upon a foundation as to preventthe liquid in the tray from washing under the face as it passes from the bottom 4. up over the end of the tray. The fact will readily be appreciated that if the corrugations at the bottom of the tray were con tinued where the portions 6 are located, there would be opportunity for the liquid washing under the plates or films and elevating them instead of flowing over their tops as it must do to effect a complete covering of the plates or prints in the llQCBSSEIlV fiow thereover.

8 designates a partition, removably mounted in the tray and provided with perforations 9. This partition is adapted to be shifted and seated in paired oppositely arranged grooves 1 in the side walls of the tray, so that it will be present either at the lower end of one of the tray sections, or at the lower end of the other tray sectionto serve as a stop for the photographic objects laid in the section in which the partition is present, to prevent movement of such objects into the other tray section, while permitting fiow of the liquid treating agent through the partition first in one direction and then in the opposite direction. The partition is also provided at its bottom with drain openings 10.

The two sections of my tray are preferably made of differing sizes in order that photographic objects of different sizes may be treated in the sections to the best advantage.

In the practical use of my tray, a photographic object, such as a dry plate, to be developed or fixed, or a print to be toned and fixed, is placed in either section of the tray and the solution or treating agent is placed in the other section. hen the partition '8 is in the position shown in the drawings, the photographic object would be placed in the section indicated by the letter A, which extends upwardly, while the treating agent would be placed in the section B, which would be preferably arranged horizontally. The photographic object is preferably so placed that it rests upon the plane portion 6 of the bottom of the tray. Now, when the tray is tilted, preferably on longi tudinal rockers 11 provided at the bottom of the tray, (see Fig. II), the solution flows from the section B through the partition 8 and into the section A, so that it flows over the photographic object and reaches the uter end of the section A. Then, as the tray is tilted in the opposite direction, a reverse flow ofthe solution takes place and it is caused to travel so that it will be delivered in an even manner to the photographic object and flow thereover with amaximum efliciency of treatment of said photographic object.

The tray herein described is preferably made of a suitable composition such as that commonly utilized in the manufacture of photographers trays.

I claim 1- 1. A photographers rocking tray of approximately L-shape, having transverse corrugations at its opposite ends, a central plane part, a transverse partition having perforations and located at the central plane part, and plane surfaces intermediate of the sides extending lengthwise of the tray central plane part. a g

2. A photographers rocking tray of approximately L-shape, having longitudinal rockers and transverse corrugations at its opposite ends, a central plane part, a transverse partition having perforations and located at the central plane part, and plane surfaces intermediate of the sides extending lengthwise of the tray from the central plane part.

3. A photographers rocking tray of approximately L-shape, having transverse corrugations at its opposite ends, a central plane part, a transverse partition having perforations and drain openings and located at the central plane part, and plane surfaces intermediate of the sides extending lengthfrom the wise of the tray from the central plane part.

4. A photographers rocking tray of approximately L-shape having transverse corrugations at its opposite ends, a central plane part, paired oppositely arranged grooves located at the central plane part, a transverse partition having perforations and shiftable from one pair of grooves to the other pair of grooves, and plane surfaces intermediate of the sides extending lengthwise of the tray from the central plane part.

WM. HOTZE.

In the presence of A. J. MCGAULEY, E. B. LINN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3721175 *Jul 2, 1971Mar 20, 1973Needleman SPhotographic processing apparatus
US4157868 *Jun 20, 1977Jun 12, 1979Samuel NeedlemanPhotographic processing tray
US4282972 *Feb 15, 1980Aug 11, 1981Chiulli Robert DPan for angiographic catheters
US6802323 *May 4, 2001Oct 12, 2004Isurgical, LlcMethod and apparatus for storing guide wires
US20040255991 *Jul 19, 2004Dec 23, 2004Isurgical, LlcMethod and apparatus for storing guide wires
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG03D13/04