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Publication numberUS982251 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1911
Filing dateMay 8, 1908
Priority dateMay 8, 1908
Publication numberUS 982251 A, US 982251A, US-A-982251, US982251 A, US982251A
InventorsRobert W Coffee
Original AssigneeLewis M Keizer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal-combustion engine.
US 982251 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. W. COFFEE.

lNTERNAL GOMBUSTION ENGINE. (APPLICATION FILED MAY a, 1908.

Patented Jan. 24, -1911.

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ATTORNEYS R. W. COFFEE.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAY a, 190e.

Patented J an. 24, 1911.

WTNESSES:

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INTERNAL-consuswron rico and State of Vlrginia, havednvented certain newy and useful Improvements in Internal-CombustionEngines, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to certain new 'and useful'improvements in internal combustion engines, and has for an object to provide an engine wherein a main Vpiston controlled exhaust coperates with a supplemental valved exhaust and air scavenger means to relieve the engineof the original exploded 'charge without over-.heatin the exhaust valve and hence prolong the li e of the engine.

Another object of my invention is to pro' working cy inder and a 'means for imparting an initlal compression "to the new charge vide an improved scavenging means for the within the working cylinder. These features are used separately and in combination.

With other objects in view, which will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which in s, in which like numerals an re erence indicate like parts in all of thev the invention appertains, the inventionalso includes those details 'of construction com-l bination and-iarrangement of parts, which will be first duly described, and then specifically pointed out in the appended claims, reference bein hadto the accompanying drawings, in w ich t Figure 1, is a central vertical cross section` of a single cylinder type of my invention. Fig. 2, is a top plan view thereof. Figs. `3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are views illustrating the various positions of the piston and valves 'duringthe different portions of the movement to effect a complete cycle of operation. Fig. 8, is a dia of the cycle of the engine, whlich wi l be hereinafter referred to inde tai Referring now to the accompanfing drawletters .of

figures, 1 designates 'the bed of the engine which also forms the crank case and in bearings in which the crank shaft 6 is journaled.

The crank shaft 6 is provided with the crank 7 to which the piston rod 8 is coupled, and the piston rod 8, in turn, couples with the piston 5 that operates in the working cylinder of the engine. v d

2-2 represents the workin cylinder, on

l. the outside of which a pair o spaced annular'fla'nges 23j-2, are formed, the flanges A engine. s

plate 3, to form an exhaust chamber 2c between the plate and the iiange's 2a and 2b.

2d 1s a series of piston controlled exhaust p orts which communicate between the explosion chamber of 4the cylinder 2 and the ex- .haust chamber 2, the exhaust passing `from the chamber 2c through a passage 9, to a main exhaust outlet 9,'fr'om which the ex' haust may bepiped to any desired place.

4 represents a'casing held in peripheral grooves in lianges 2f and 2, respectively, of the' engine cylinder to form a water jacket for the exhaust chamber 2, as clearly indi'- cated in Fig. 1, of the drawings.

-The cylinder 2 is provided with an explo- A sion chamber 2*, coperating with the piston` 2EL and 2" bein provided with grooves the1rper1phera surfaces toreceive a thin Specication of Letters `Patent. Patentd Jan, 24, 1911, Application med my 8,1905. semi no. 431,646.

chamber 2y and in communication with the l inlet port 118L and the supplemental exhaust port 10a, hereinafter agam referred to.

The passage of the exhaust through the port 10 is controlled by a valve 10, which is spring .pressed to its closed osition and opened through the medium o a lever 10b fulcrumed at 10 to a fixed support on the The lever 10b is operated through al rod 10d, by a lever 10e and a cam 10?, the cam 10 being formed on the cam shaft 10Bv that is geared with the crank shaft 6, as shown, by gears 10 and 10, respectively. The cam 10t operates onthe lever 10 through the medium of an anti-friction roller lOY, or in'any other a proved manner. f

The inlet port 11 of the cylinder communicatesthrougha pipe 11b with the double valved chamber 11 into which the working agent is passed,as is also the compressed air from a suitable storage reservoir. The working a ent from the carbureter is passed into the pipe 11b through a valve 13 that is normally spring pressed to itsclosed position, the valve 13' closing the passage 11" from the connection 13' that comes from'the carbureter. v

' In carry' g out mg' v invention any suitable means 1s provlded or storm up 4'air in a suitable reservoir or pump, an the air from ressure of say five pounds to the s uare inc is led through the l pi e 12x into t e valve chamber 12y from w ich it passes into the pipe 11b through the 1 medium of a valved opening, the opening being closed by a valve 12 that is pressed by a spring 12 to itsv closed position and is opened t lrough the medlum of a rod 12" that is operated by a lever 12, fulcrumed at 12,

and carrying antifriction rollers 12", the lever 12 bein operated by a cam 12'on a cam shaft 12m t at is eared by gears 12R-12 with the crank sha t 6. The cam 12m is provided with a pair of cam members 12 and 12t that coperate with the anti-friction roller 121 to operate the lever 12c at predetermined times. 4

The engine shown operates on the four stroke cycle and a brief reference to Fig. 8 of the. drawings will make the operation clear. 4 Assumin the point A to'be the beginning of the st stroke of the cycle, and the piston is moving in the direction of the arrow a, 4and drawing in a new charge. As 'soon as the piston reaches the pointv B, it 20. will have drawn in a-complete new charge through the valve 13, it being understood that during this rst stroke of the cycle the valves 12 and 10 are closed. The working agent drawn in on the lirst stroke of the cycle isvery rich in gasolene and poor in air, for a purpose which will be presently more fully understood. At the end of the first stroke of the cycle the piston having drawn in a complete new charge, the partswili be in the position shown in Fig. 3. As the piston moves on its second stroke of its cycle, from the position B, toward the position C,

in Fig. 8 of the drawings, and and soon as the piston 5 has again closed the exhaust port 2, (the parts being in the position shown in Fig. 4) the'cam l2t will be momentarily open the valve 12 from the source of compressed air supply and permit the compressed air to ilow into the explosion chamber of the engine in back of the new charge and impart an initial compression thereto. The additional air supplied from the compressed air tank, by this operation is sufficient to reduce the richness of the mixture of working agent to its proper proportion for explosion. When the piston is in the position shown in Fig. 4, the point B will have been reached in Fig. 8, that is to say, the piston will have moved a slight distance on its second stroke of the cycle. As the piston continues to complete the second stroke of its cycle, moving from the point B to the point C in Fig.

8, or from the position shown in Fig. 4, to

v the position shown in Fig. l, it will be compressing the new charge of working agent,

and when the piston has reached the position shown in Fig. 1, the new charge in* the explosion chamber'2.x will be ignited, thus p forcing the piston on its third stroke of its cycle, from the point C in Fig. 8, to the point D in Fig. 8, the piston thus operating under the effect of the exploded charge. As the piston uncovers the exhaust 2d, the exploded mixture will be initially exhausted into the exhaust chamber 2c and from thence conveyed byl the passage 9* to the exhaust outlet 9. T e arts will then be in the posiv ltion shown in `ig. 5, with the piston at the lowermost limit of its stroke, and all valves closed. As the piston moves from the posil tion shown in Fig. 5, to the position shown in Fig. 6, the cam l10t will open'the auxiliary exhaust valve 10, just as the piston I starts on the third stroke of its cycle, so that the piston forces tlie residue of burned mixture out throughthe auxiliary valve 10, it beinv` understood that the primary exhaust, whici took place through the exhaust 2d, carried olf the-hottest part of` thevcharge. As the piston nears the ,endv of its fourth stroke, and arrives at the position shown in Fig. 6, which is equivalent to the position of the point E', in Fig. 8, the cam 12e will again open the air valve 12 and allow compressed air to be forced into the chamber 2x and expel the residue. of burned mixture, the valve 12 being again closed as soon as the piston reaches the end of its fourth stroke, or the point E, in Fig. 8. 'Ihe point Ein Fig. 8, coincides with the point A in Fig. 8, 90 and is both the end of the cycle and the beginning of the next.

From the foregoing it will be seen that in operation my engine first draws in a new charge and then compressessaidcharge, first by an air pressure and then by the continuous movement of the piston, causing Va piston compression. As soon as the charge has been' thus completely compressed, an explosion occurs and operates the piston one stroke under its force, the exploded mixture exhausting through the piston controlled exhaust at the end of the stroke, and the piston on its return stroke forcing out the remainder of the burned mixture, this action of the piston in forcing out the remainder of the burned mixture, through a positively operated valve, being aided through the medlum of an air scavenging means.

N umerous modifications in the design and application of my initial compression and air scavenging means may be made as well as numerous variations in the construction of the engine may be made, without departing from the spirit of the invention or the 115 scope of the appended claims and I particularly desire to have it understood that the term valve controlled herein is used in its broadest sense as relating to any means for controlling a port or passage.

From the foregoing description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it is thought the complete construction, operation and advantages of my invention will be readily understoodv by those skilled in the art to which the invention appertains.

. What I claim is 1. In an internal combustion engine, a valve-controlled inlet for fuel, means for opening the fuel inlet while the cylinder 130 space is expanding, means for supplying air under pressure, a valve-controlled air inlet, and means for opening the air Valve during the compression stroke to admit compressed air to the charge. I

2. In an internal combustion en ine of the four-cycle type, a Valve-controlle inlet for fuel, a valve-controlled inlet for air, a source of air under pressure and means for opening the air Valve during the first part of the compression stroke.

3. In an internal combustion engine, a piston-controlled initial exhaust port and a supplemental valve-controlled exhaust port, means for opening the Valve during the exhaust stroke, a valve-controlled inlet for mixture, a valve-controlled inlet for air means for supplying air under pressure, an means for opening the air valve for a short period during compression and for another short period While the supplemental exhaust valve is open.

4. In an internal combustion engine of the four-cycle type, a piston-controlled initial exhaust port, and a supplemental valvecontrolled exhaust port, means for opening the valve during the exhaust stroke, a valveeontrolled inlet for mixture, a valve-controlled inlet for air, means for supplying air under pressure, and means for opening the air valve for a short period 'during compression and for another short period While the supplemental exhaust valve is open.

z In an internal combustion engine, a valve-controlled inlet for fuel, a valve-com trolled inlet for air, means for supplying air under pressure, and means for opening the air valve for a short period during compres- .l'ion and for another short period during exaust.

6. In an internal combustion engine, a valve controlled inlet for fuel, means for controlling the fuel valve whereby it is permitted to open While the cylinder space is expanding, means for supplying compressed air, a valve controlled inlet for air and means for opening the air valve during the early part of the compression stroke to admit air to the partly compressed charge.

7. In an internal combustion engine, means for maintaining a supply of non-combustible mixture, an inlet to the combustion chamber to which the mixture is supplied, a Valve in said inlet, means controlling the Valve to permit it to open While the cylinder space is expanding, a source of air under compression, a valve controlled air inlet and means for opening the air valve during the early part of the compression stroke to admit air to the partly compressed non-combustible mixture and thereby render the same combustible.

8. In an internal combustion engine of the four-cycle type, means for supplying noncombustible mixture, a Valve Controlling the supply, opening toward the cylinder, and means for maintaining it normally closed, means for supplying air under pressure, an air valve, a passage leading to t-he cylinder into which both valves open, means for opening the air valve during the early part of the compression stroke, the fuel Valve being opened during the admission stroke, an exhaust port and means for opening and closing the same.

ROBERT W. COFFEE.

Witnesses:

J. A. HILLEARY, Jr., RAYMOND L. ZIEGLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415507 *Feb 7, 1945Feb 11, 1947Marion MalloryInternal-combustion engine
US3964451 *Dec 13, 1973Jun 22, 1976Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaInternal combustion engine with a supercharger
US4060061 *Sep 19, 1975Nov 29, 1977Might Willard CProcess and apparatus for improved I.C. engine composition
US7178492Sep 3, 2004Feb 20, 2007Caterpillar IncAir and fuel supply system for combustion engine
US7191743Nov 19, 2004Mar 20, 2007Caterpillar IncAir and fuel supply system for a combustion engine
US7201121Nov 19, 2004Apr 10, 2007Caterpillar IncCombustion engine including fluidically-driven engine valve actuator
US7204213Apr 14, 2005Apr 17, 2007Caterpillar IncAir and fuel supply system for combustion engine
US7222614Nov 23, 2004May 29, 2007Bryant Clyde CInternal combustion engine and working cycle
US7252054Nov 19, 2004Aug 7, 2007Caterpillar IncCombustion engine including cam phase-shifting
US7281527Aug 4, 2000Oct 16, 2007Bryant Clyde CInternal combustion engine and working cycle
US8215292Sep 27, 2005Jul 10, 2012Bryant Clyde CInternal combustion engine and working cycle
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF02B19/1028