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Publication numberUS986723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1911
Filing dateNov 14, 1910
Priority dateNov 14, 1910
Publication numberUS 986723 A, US 986723A, US-A-986723, US986723 A, US986723A
InventorsFred B King
Original AssigneeNat Spring And Wire Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring-seat construction.
US 986723 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. B. KING.

SPRING SEAT CONSTRUCTION.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 14, 1910. 6,723. Patented Mm. 14, 1911.

2 BHEETSSHEB'I' 1.

F. B. KING.

SPRING SEAT CONSTRUCTION.

APPLIUATION FILED Nov.14, 1910.

Patented Mar. 14E, 191]..

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

UNITED sfrafrns PATENT OFFICE.

FRED B. KING, 0F ALBION. MICHIGAN. ASSIGNOR T0 NATIONAL SPRING .AND WIRE COMPANY, OF ALBION, MICHIGAN. A CORPORATION OF MICHIGAN.

SPRING-SEAT CONSTRUCTION.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 14, 1911.

Application filed November 14, 1910. Serial No. 592,194.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that l, liann B. Kino, a citizen of the United States of America, residing aty Albion, in the county ol Calhoun and State ot' Michigan, have invented certain new and useful .Improvements in Spring- Seat Construction, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings.

In spring construction of seats adapted for Vehicles, `it is desirable that the parts be. so disposed as to be quickly assembled and that the seat structure when completed be adapted to use :for either light or heavy loads.

This invention relates to seat construction provided with means whereby the main springs may be reinforced it desired by auxiliary springs which aid in taking up the load after the. main springs have been partially depressed, the auxiliary springs being so arranged as to constitute a bodily removable unit which may be easily placed in position in the main seat when desired.

The invention consists in the matters hereinafter set forth, and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view, in section, of an assembled seat that embodies features of the invention; Fig. 2 is a View in end elevation thereof; F 2l is a view in section on or about line :1f-.11 of Fig. 1, and Fig. 4 is a View in perspective of a portion of the seat.

As herein indicated as a preferred form of-construction a marginal base frame is made of a wire 1 of proper proportions along the sides and ends of which a series of regularly disposed spiral coil marginal main springs 2 of the usual furniture type or hour glass pattern are secured at intervals as by clips 3 or like suitable means. Thev lower convolutions of inner main springs 4 of like pattern are mounted on spacing rods 5 secured near their ends iii pairs in parallel relation to the lower con- Volutioiis of the marginal springs 2 which are secured to the ends of the base frame, the ends of the rods being unattached to and clear of the base frame. The inner portions of the lower convolutions of the main springs on the sides of the main frame are likewise connected by suitable clips 6 to side bars 7 similar in all respects to the spacing rods 5. The upper convolutions of the inargina] springs 2 are secured together by an upper rim frame S which is fastened in position by clips i) preferably of the same type as those used in the base trame. The upper convolutions of the interior springs 4 are not stayed.

An auxiliary base frame is formed of intersecting st rips lt), preferably of flat spring sheet material which are spaced to lie between the main frames, are riveted or otherwise secured together at their intersections and are detachably secured to the lower rim :trame S as by folding the ends around the wire forming the latter. At each intersection an auxiliary spring is mounted on the strips. llie latter which are preferably conoidalasindicated at ]1,areeach secured to the strips by insertion through tongues or loops .l2 struck out from the bodies ol the strips or may be otherwise` made fast in any suitable manner. Their upper extremities are interconnected by resilient and flexible bars 123 which are free from connection with either the main base trame or the upper rim frame or ilroni the main springs. Further more, the auxiliary frame strips 1() when placed on the main frame, lie above the rods 5 and side members T.

As a result of this (amstruction a spring seat is obtained which, while it is available lor use in supportingr heavy loads, may also be arranged to carry lighter burdens by removing the auxiliary springs, which is readily donc by disconnecting the auxiliary Yl'rame strip ends from the lower rim frame.

ln the use of the complete assembled structure a load on the central portion ot' the main slfn'ings, as it partially depresses the latter, forces the spacing rods down into approximately the positions indicated in Fig. El, clear ot the auxiliary base f ame which is not etl'ected until further depression of the main springs brings the load to act on the shorter auxiliary springs. The auxiliary 'frame then takes up its share ot weight and transmits it to the lower rini frame which is of course usually rigidly supported. This produces a cheap and ellicient seat which is iioiseless in its action and which may be adj listed for either light or heavy service without difficulty as the auxiliary members may be removed if desired, Without disintegrating the main structure.

Obviously, changes in the details of conlstruction may be made without departing solelyby the end marginal springs, spiral inner main springs each independently supported by the Spacing rods and an upper ase "rame spiral marginal main sprin rim frame connecting the side and end marginal main springs. Y

2. In spring constructions, a marginal base frame, spiral marginal main sprlngs secured at intervals on the sides and ends of the base frame, said bars connecting the lower portions of the side marginal sprmgs independently of the base frame, spacing rods supported by the lower portions of the end marginal main springs independently of the base frame, spiral inner main springs each independently supported on the spacing rods and an upper rim frame to which the upper portion of the side and end marginal main frames are connected.

3. In spring constructions, a marginal base frame, spiral marginal main springs secured at regular intervals by their base convolutions to the sides and ends of the base frame, Vspacing rods secured to and supported by the base convolutions of the end marginal main springs independently of the base frame, inner spiral main springs whose lower convolutions are secured to and supported by the acing rods independently of each other and of the base frame and an upper rim frame secured to and supported by the upper convolutions of theend and side marginal main springs only.

4. In spring constructions, a marginal base frame, spiral marginal main springs secured at regular intervals -by their base convolutions to the sides and ends of the base frame, spacing rods secured to and supported by the base convolutions of the end marginal springs independently of the base frame, spacmg bars secured to and supported bythe base convolutions of the side marginal main springs independently of the base frame, spacing rods, spiral inner main A.springs secured at regular intervals by their base convolutions to the spacing rods independently of the marginal base frame, and an upper rim frame connected to and supported solely by the upper convolutions of the marginal end and side main springs.

5. In spring constructions, a marginal base frame, spiral marginal main springs secured at regular intervals on the sides and Vends of the base frame, spacing rods secured to and supported by the marginal end main springs independently of the marginal base frame, spiral inner main springsfsecured at regular intervals on the spacmg rods, an

upper rim frame secured on the upper portions of the side and cud main springs, an auxiliary base frame secured to the marginal base frame over the spacing rods, auX- iliary springs mounted on the auxiliary frame between the main springs, and resilient connections between the upper ends of the auxiliary springs independent of the main baseand upper rim frames and of the main springs.

6. ln sprlng constructions, Va margmal upper rim frame secured on the upper per-'- tions of the side and end main springs, 1ntersecting strips interposed Abetween the vmain springs over the spacing bars and secured at their ends to the base frame, andv auxiliary springs each secured on the strips at their intersection with their upper ends independent of the main springs and the base and rim frames.

7 In spring constructions, a marginal base. frame, spiral marginal main secured at intervals to the sides and ends of the base frame by their base convolutions, spacing rods secured to and supported by the base kconvolutions of the main springs independently of the base frame, an upper rim frame connecting the upper convolutions of the marginal main frames, spiral inner main springs each connected to and supported on the spacing rods by its lower convolution independently 'of the adjacent springs, the upper portion of said spring being disconnected from the other springs and said frames, an auxiliary base frame consisting of crossed strips secured to ether at their intersections in spaced relatlon to clear the main springs and attached at their ends to the marginal base frame, auxiliary springs of less height thanfthe main springs each secured by its base convolution to a pair of auxiliary strips at the intersection thereof, andresilient bars connecting the upper convolutions of the auxiliary springs, the spacing rods being adapted'to-bend under load on the main springs independently of the auxiliary strips, and the latter bei adapted to dex only under load tr 'tte bythe auxiliary springs.

8. In spring constructions, a marginal base frame, spiral marginal main springs secured at intervals to the sides and ends of the base frame by-their base convolutions,

spacing rods secured to and supported by the base convolutions of the mam springs independently of the base frame, an upper rim frame connecting the upper convolutions of the marginal main frames, spiral inner main springs each connected lo and supported on the spacin rods by its lower convolution independent y of the adjacent springs, the upper portion of said spring being disconnected from the other springs and said frames, an auxiliary base frame consisting of crossed strips secured torrether at their intersections in spaced relation to clear the main sprin s and attached at their ends to the margina base frame, auxiliary springs of less height than the main springs each secured by its base convolution to a pair of auxiliary strips at the intersection thereof, and resilient bars connecting the upper convolutions of the auxiliary springs,

the spring rods being adapted to bend under load on the main springs independently of the auxiliar' stri )5, and the latter being adapted to ex oniy under load transmitted by the auxiliary springs, and the auxiliary springs and supgorting strips being removable without isturbance of the main springs and frames.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature 1n presence of two witnesses.

FRED B. KING.

Witnesses Roar. T. STEVENS, BLANCHE H. HoY'r.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3917339 *Jun 17, 1974Nov 4, 1975Fritz Fred WImpact energy absorbing system for a row of vehicle seats
US5570484 *Jul 15, 1994Nov 5, 1996L&P Property Management CompanyMattress and mattress core having dual rectangular inner border rods
US6996866Jan 29, 2002Feb 14, 2006Mattress Development CompanyMattress structure with an improved lumbar zone
US7181796 *Dec 5, 2005Feb 27, 2007Mattress Development CompanyMattress structure with an improved lumbar zone
WO2003063652A1 *Jan 29, 2002Aug 7, 2003Stuart Scott CarlitzMattress structure with an improved lumbar zone
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/061