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Publication numberUSD10767 S
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1878
Publication numberUS D10767 S, US D10767S, US-S-D10767, USD10767 S, USD10767S
InventorsJulius Herriet
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Design for a font of ornamental printing-types
US D10767 S
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UNITED STATES PATENT FEICE.

J ULlUS HERRIET, OF N ENV YORK, N. Y.,

ASSIGNOR TO DAVID VOLFE BRUCE,

OF SAME PLACE.

DESIGN FOR A FONT OF ORNAMENTAL PRINTING-TYPES.

Spccilication forming part ot' Design No. 10,767, dated August 6, 1378; application tiled July 23, 1ST-5.

[Term of patent 14 years] To all whom it 'may concern:

Be it known that I, J ULIUs HERRIET, of the city and county of New York, and State of New York, have originated and designed a new Design or Pattern for a Font ot' Ornamental Printing'lypes, of which the following is a specification:

The nat-ure of my design is clearly shown in the accompanying typographieimpression, to which reference is made; and consists of lower-case and capital letters, points, and iigures, open or skeletonized, bounded by lines light as hair-lines upon the left hand and superior portions, but heavy, forming a shade, upon the right hand and inferior portions of the letter or character the outlines of which they compose. Variations in the course of these light and heavy bounding lines composing and forming the outlines of the letter or character describe certain dentated and leaflike gures, also open or skeletonized, which, for convenience in reference, may be classified as follows: Class 1, asmall-pointed projection conical or pyramidal in shape; class 2, a small single-pointed curved leaf-like figure with one side convex and the other concave; class 3, a small double-leaf-like ligure formed by a combination of the figure described in class 2 with another small ovoidal-leaf-like figure; class 4, a double-leaf-like figure, ditferin g from the 1i gure described in class 3 only in the increase in length and pointed extremity given the leatlilie figure of ovoidal form in class 3; class 5, a curved sin gle-pointed leatlike ligure with petiole attachment at the base 5 class 6, a long curved pointed leaf-like figure, the base of which is in many cases carried into continuation and combination on both sides with the figure described in class 2; class 7, a curved cimeter-lile figure with concave curve at the point.

The figures described above are those most used in the design; but in many instances they are great-ly modified and altered accordin g to position and necessity. There are other Iigures, which will be mentioned after they are more fully described.

The ligure described in class 1 has, in this design, but little use other than simple ornamentation, its only combinations being with that described in class 2. It is seen above formed by the light bounding-line of the letter at the inner or left-hand side of the stem or statt' of the lower-case d, center portion. lt also appears formed by the same light bounding-line in the lower-case a, k, p, z, hyphen point, figures 4, 9, and capital A, B, O, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, M, N, O, P, Q, 1t, T, U, V, W, X, Z, and in the character &.

The figure described in class 2 appears in combination with that described in class 1, both doubly and singly, doubly as seen in their production by the light boundingliue on the outer left-hand side ofthe figure 6 and the nought, and singly as seen in theinner curved or rounded portion ot the figures 5 and 6, the nought, and the dollar sign. The figure 9 and capital 0, Q, 1), and R also furnish samples of one or the other of these two combinations. The heavy boundingfline composing the letter or character also produces the figure described in class 1, and it is shown either by itself or in either one or the other combinations just described, so produced in the lower-ease b, d, f, h, i,j, l, 1n, n, o, p, q, u, z, figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, S, 9, the nought, and in the capital A, B, C, D, E, F, G, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, T, U, V, W, Y, Z, and the character &.

The figure described in class 2 is plainly shown upon the left side outer part of the lower-case o, where produced by the light bounding-line of the letter, and upon the righthand outer portion ot' the same letter where produced by the heavy boundin g line. It varies in size, being slightly larger or smaller in different letters or characters, in being reversed in position, and in having the shade iu some instances upon its concave side, and in others upon its convex side. Itis varied also by having, in sonic instances, as at the upper third of the right-hand side of the lowercase d, the line bounding its convex side produced or carried into the open or skeletonized portion of the letter or character, forming upon the remaining portion ot' the bounding-line of the letter or character a small angle similar to the conical or pyramidal projection described in class 1.

rlhc combinations of the figure described in class 2 are various` In combination with a figure of its own class it forms the upper and lower extremities of portions of many of the letters or characters, (see upper termination of stem or stati' of b, d, h, and others,) and with an additional figure (which, though bounded on both sides by convex lilies, is, for convenience, included in the same class) inserted between it forms the lower extremities of many others. (See lower-case l, p, q, and others.)

The difference between the upper and lower terminations of letters or characters formed by the combinations just described is that, for example, the termination of the staff of the lower-case l, at its lowest extremity, is in two of the figures described in class 2 with their points curved outward, and the small pointed figure, with both sides convex, between and connecting at its base with the convex sides of the other two figures, whilein the upper termination of the sameletter the figure ot' class 2 is removed from one side, and a section removes also a portion of the central iigure, converting it into a figure of class 2, and both result in an angle similar to the conical or pyramidal projection described in class 1, and also to the angles in what is known as black7 letter. This difference between the upper and lower terminations, and combinations forming them, as seen in the lower-case l, will explain the inclusion of the central figure in class 2, as previously stated.

The gure described in class 2 appears in combination with the figure described in class 1, in the manner previously described. It is found forming combinations with figures of its own class, as previously described and shown, at the upper and lower terminations .of the stems or staffs of the lower-case b, d, h, k, 1, and others, and in similar upper and lower terminations of many of the capitals, and also in the gnres, and with or without the central figure before mentioned. It is shown at the lower portion of the stem or staff of the lowercase b with the central figure omitted, and one of the remaining figures of class 2, having its point carried inward in connection with the lower curved or rounded portion of the letter. It is shown in the lowercase d with the central figure, and making connectionbetween the stem orstaff and the curved or rounded portion ofthe letter in a similar manner. It is shown in the lower-case m in combination similar to that at the upper extremity of the lower-case l, already described, but with the connection made at the projecting angle or figure described in class l. Itis shown in substitutions for the balls or dots of thc lower-case s, with slight alteration in form in the cross-lines of the lower-case t and f, with an additional dot or ball at its base in the figure 1, capital Z, and in the char acter &. The smallngurc at the ri ght-hand side lower third of the stem or stai of the lowercase b, h, l, andthe similar figure at the lower third left-hand side of the stem or staff of the lower-case d, is also included in class 2.

The figure described in class 3, which is a combination of that described in class 2 with a small ovoidal-leaf-like gure, is shown pro duced and formed by the light bounding-line of the letter on the left-hand side center portion of the. staff of the lower-case i, and produced by the heavy bounding-line upon the right or inner side of the curved or rounded portion ofthe lower-case d, and in similar positions in the lower-case a, b, c, f, h, j,1n, n, o, p, q, r, t, u, v, w, y. I

In the lower-case e, the connection in the center is made by the upper ligure of the combination known as class 3, which is similar to class 2, meeting and joining with another figure of the latter class, the opened or skeletonized portion of the letter being continued and joined through said connection.

The figure described in class 4, which differs from that described in class 3 only in the substitution of a pointed leaf in the place of thc ovoidal one, is seen in its simplest form produced by the light bounding-line on the left side of the stem or stall` of the lower-case b, li, and l, and with the addition of a ball or dot at the termination of the line bounding and dcscribin g one of the sides of the largest figure of the combination, and carried into the skeletonised or open portion of the letter or character, in the capital C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, L, M, O, Q, T, U, V, W, X, and produced by the heavy bounding-line of the letter; also with the additional ball or dot, in the capital A and Y.

The figure described in class 3 and that described in class 4 also describe at the point of meeting between the bounding-line of the letter or character and a line bounding one of the sides of the figures of the figures described in those classes, a small angle similar to that described in class 2, they all, as before stated, similar to the conical or pyramidal projection described in class 1, but the angle is rather more obtuse.

The figure described in class 5 forms substi tute for the ball of the lower-case a, c, f, g, j, v, and y, the iigures 2, 3, 5, 6, and 9, the dol lar sign, and the capital J. It appears, also, with the addition of a small point at one side near its base, in the capital A, B, C, D, P, and R, and it appears in both forms in other por tions of the capital A and H.

The figure described in class 6 is seen for1n ing the top of the lower case t, in combination with two of the gures described in class 2. It is shown again in similar combination, with the figure described in class 5 added in the lowercase f 5 and is shown in combination again with two of the figures described in class 2, smaller in size and varied in position and shade at the lower portion of the lower-case v and w, and the capital V and W.

The figure described in class forms, in

combination with two of the figures described in class 2, one on each side, the lower termination of thc last leg of the lower-case h, m, and n, and is an increase in size and alteration in shape otl the central figure referred to in the combination described in class 2. It is shown slightly modified in form and shade in the upper portion of the lower-case v and W, and in the capital V and W, and, with one of the figures of class 2 removed or omitted, in the upper and lower portions of' the lowercase x, also by itself in the figure 7.

The whole design is a combination of the above-described figures with the additional balls or dots in the capitals, the tendril-like attachments to the center portions of the B, H, K, 1t,with skeleton-ball attachments, and those to the upper and lower portion of the capital S, with the double-pointed leaf-like terminations, these last referred to in the B, K, P, and R passing through the stems or staffs of the letter at the point marked by the ball or dot, froln the front and right backward and toward the left.

The stems or staffs of the lower-case letters are combinations of the straight line with one or more of the combinations described above, and the curved or rounded portions are similarly combinations of the curved lines with the combinations described, and divided into classes.

The capital letter also is a combination of the straight and curved lines with the figures or combinations of figures as divided into classes, with the few additions recited above, the additional open or skeleton balls at the lower portion of the A and R, the tongues of the E and F, which are similar to the combinations already described at the upper portions of the lower-case t and f, with the eentral figure of the combination reduced to a small conical point, and the two remaining figures greatly lengthened and bearing stron ger resemblance to that described in class 6,

and the pendants to the T and corresponding portions of other capital letters, which are a modification of' the figures described in classes 3 and 6 in combination with that described in class 2.

The comma, semicolon, colon, period, and apostrophe are of ordinary form, open or skeletonized, the hyphen a combination of' the figures described in classes l and 2, and the interrogation and exclamation points are'combinations of several of the other figures classified above. The figures are also combinations of the various figures or combinations of tigures classified and described above with straight or curved lines.

Within the open or skeletonized portions of all the lower-case and capital letters, points, and figures are placed certain short hair-lines, at nearly equal distances apart and parallel one with another, connecting with the heavy bounding-line and extending diagonally downward and toward the left, with an open or clear space between their extremities and the light bounding-line.

The design differs from each and every other either because of' the shape of the figures forming its different combinations, as classified and described above, in the manner of combination as also described, or in the combination of' all in a single design.

What I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-v The design for a font of ornamental printingtypes, as shown and described.

J ULIUS HERRIET.

Witnesses:

V. B. MUNsoN, D. F. AHEARN.