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Publication numberUSD20750 S
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1891
Filing dateApr 14, 1891
Publication numberUS D20750 S, US D20750S, US-S-D20750, USD20750 S, USD20750S
InventorsJohn West
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Design for a font of printi n g-type
US D20750 S
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

DESIGN.

J. WEST. PONT 0F PRINTING TYPE.

No. 20,750. Patented May '519, 1891.

abcd'efghiiklmnopqrswvuW-Z um .51234561890 Hmmm www muewto/L UNITED STATES PATENT OEEICE.

JOHN VEST, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO BARNI-IART BROTHERS du SPINDLER, OF SAME PLACE.

DESIGN FOR A FONT OF PRINTING-TYPE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Design No. 20,7 50, dated May 19, 1891.

Application letl April 14, 1891. Serial No. 388,946. Term of patent 14 years'.

To all whom t may concern/.-

Be it known that I, JOHN IVEST, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, county of Cook, and State of Illinois, have invented and produced a new and original Design foraFont of Printing-Type, which is full y set forth in the following specification, reference being had to the accompanying typographical impressions, forming a part thereof.

This design includes lower-case letters, capitals, iigures, points, dollar-mark, and character &. In general character it is extended, quite ornamental, having heavy face with shade-lines. All terminal lines are concave at the end,and, with a few exceptions, are expanded at the end,the expansion in someinstances, however, being scarcely more than a ceriph, but. in most instances not being a true ceriph, but answering only to the description above given-viz., expanded and concave at the end. This character of line, which is not a true ceriph, is found in the lower 'end of lower-case a, tail of lower-case h, k, m, n, and w, the lower end of the stem ot' figure 7, initial stem of 4capital A, horizontal strokes of capitals E and F, lower end of final stroke of capital H, oblique lowerstrole ot' capital K, horizontalstroke of capital L, tail of capital R, right-hand oblique stroke of capital Y, and both horizontal strokes of capital Z. Other like instances may be found. Lower-case f has the shade-line of the characteristic and of the end of the upper terminal of the stem blending with the shade-line of the body of the stem, making said shade-line continuous past the characteristic and terminal. Lowercase s has the upper extremity finished by an expansion which is substantially a ceriph and the lower extremity finished by a slight expansion only, the lower curve of S also being much more open than the upper curve, tangent to the former at the end, trending quite obliquely downward to the rear. The

lower-case t has the cross-stroke formed by a short triangular projection to the right t'rom the stem,but not crossing` said stem. Lowercase w has the iirst two elements curved at the bottom and the final element, consisting of a stem, extending below the line. The upcurve element of capitals D and R do not join the stem at the top, but terminate in an inwardly-tapering curve. Capital M is composed of two upwardly-curved elements having a common medial stem, while capital N, on the contrary, is angular'.

The lower limit of the letters, both upper and lower case, and especiall7 the lower-case, is irregular minate at any uniform line, no1' do the elements which extend below the line extend equally below a uniform base-line. This is observable, for example, in lower-case b, in which the curve extends a little lower than the stem, and lower-case c, which, while not having an extension which would he conventionally termed below the line, is, nevertheless, lower than any uniform linewhich could be taken as the general base-line of the font. Lower-case f extends a little below the line, but not so low as the tail of lower-case g, vwhile the oblique terminal strokes of lowercase h and k are a little lower than t and not so low as the tail of g. These instances will suflice to illustrate this characteristic.

I claim- The design for a font of printing-type herein shown and described.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand, at Chicago, Illinois, in the presence of two witness, this 25th day of March, 1891.

JOHN WEST.

lVitnesses:

CELESTE P. CHAPMAN, JULIA USLEE.

per-curve element of capital B and the singlethat is to say, they do not ter-