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Publication numberUSRE14304 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1917
Filing dateOct 19, 1916
Publication numberUS RE14304 E, US RE14304E, US-E-RE14304, USRE14304 E, USRE14304E
InventorsThe Westebn Ttmioh cohpaky
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Belay
US RE14304 E
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I w. FINN. I RELAY AND REPEATER. APPLICATION FILED OCR- 19. 19W- Reissued Mayv 22, 1917.

:7: INVENTOR.

BY 014M ATTORNEY UNITED STATES PAT NT OFFICE.

- mu m, BLQOMEIELD, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR Tommi WESTERN UNION mama: COMPANY, 01! E YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION or NEW YORK.

RELAY BEPEATER- opec'iflllation a; Reissued Letters l'atent. Reissud May 22*, 1917.

Original Io. 1,1m, |lated December 11,1915, Serial No. 878,403,-i1ed December 21, 1914. Application for reissue filed October 19, 1916. Serial No. 128,680.

. re eaters intended for high speed operation.

Ihe roleand repeater herein illustrated and described is particularly intended for use in automatic telegm h current impulses sugceed eac the line at'ratcs in excess of those of hand transmission; but my invention is not stems, wherein limited to use in automatic telegraph systerms, but is adaptable for use wherever relays and repeaters are or maybe employed. Before a. signaling impulse can actuate the ordinary mam line magnetic signal recciving devices, the main line current, and

the magnetism created thereby in; the main line signaling device, must necessarily rise to a value such as is required to eifechtfansfor of the armature of that signal receiving device from one to the other of its contact stops. If the time interval here involved can be reduced iii any Way through the medium of local appliances, materially higher speed. of transmission beomes possible together with better signals.

My invention comprises means whereby the armature of the receiving instrument is carried over positively from the one stop to the other once that armature has been started in motion; and further comprises means whereby such movement of the armature ls sturtcd. by local means, upon the diminution of the main line current Which previously held that armature stationary against one or the other of its stops, and whereby the armature is caused to anticipate in its operation, the arrival of the next succeeding; line signaling impulse. And my invention compri es various other features, all. as hereinafter described, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

The objects of my invention are to increase the effective speed of transmission 0 signals over telegraph circuits and the like, to reduce lag in repetition of signals, to obtain improved and sharper signals, particularly on high speed lines, to minimize the other through efiects of induction and other influences tending to produce false signals, to avoid sparking between the moving tongue or armature of the relay and the contact points with Whichsuch tongue coacts, thus permitting very close adjustment of such. contact points to the said tongue, and consequent small amplitude 01" movement of the tongue and brief duration of travel thereof, to permit a local recording or rcpeating instrument to start to operate to inoke a. record before the contact tongue of the main relay shall have completedits travel from the one contact stop to the other, to completely separate the opposing and accelerating circuits-of'the relay from. the line circuit, and

to make the apparatus very simple and easy oi construction and operation, and free from liability to derangement.

I will now proceed to describe my invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, and will then point out the novel features in claims. Int-he dmwin s:

Figure 1. shows diagrammatically a tele- 'graph line mmprising transmitting appayatus (illustrjtted diagrammatically) and a receiving rele'y,the latter embodying my in ventiojn:

Fig 2 is a schematic diagram of the relay itselfshowi-ng the sumeciroults in Fig. 1,

'butwith the circuit lines rearranged to make their relation more obvioils.

. Referring first to Fig. l, numeral 1 desig notes :1 transmitting key having contact stops 2 and 3 and current supply means l and 5 connected to stops '2 and 3 respectively.

The particular current supplymenns indicated are dynamo electric machines of opposite polarities; though as is well understood, other sources of current supply may be em ployed; the particular arrangement shown being a comn'lon. arrangement "for transmission by current impulses of alternately opposite direction. The key 1 may be vibrated either by hand or by any suitable means, and I do not limit myselfi to any particular means for vibrating tlmtkey in accordance with telegraphic or other signals. The key 1 may be, for example, the movable contact arm of :1 \Vheel'stone transmitter or any i other suitable type of automat1c,or mm chine transmitter. 6 designates the line conductor.

The receiving relay comprises an armsture lever 7, indicated in this instance as a pivotally supported lever playing between net spools arranged to influence the lever 7 just as the magnet spools of an ordinary polar relay actuate the armature lever'of 1' such relay. -While Ihave shown the spools 2 1 1 11, 12-12 and 13-13 as separate 's'pools, forclearness of diagrammatic illusv tration, it will be understood that in pracgtice' only one pair of spools may, and

commonly will, be employed, such spools each having three diflerent windings corre- V ,sponding to the windings 11, 12 and 13. It

it not uncommon in polar relays to provide each spool with two or more separate windings; but it is common for clearness of illus tration, to indicate such separate windings, in diagrammatic drawings, as if such separate windings were on different spools.

14 designates a' local or secondary relay which maybe understood to be a polar relay and to be capable of operatingby means of contact stops 15 and 16, and its armature 17, any desired local signal receiving or signal repeating or translating apparatus; or the armature 17 may operate such signal receiving or signal repeating or translating apparatus mechanically; this being, for present purposes, an immaterial detail; or the instrument 14'may be itself a sounder; and for present purposes, the relay 14 may be regarded as the local receiving and repeating instrument of the telegraph system. That it may be understood as capable of repeating into a further line circuit, 6*, I have shown such further line circuit 6 connected to the armature 17 of the secondary relay 14, and have shown sources of current supply, 4 and 5", of relatively opposite potential, con nected to its contact stops 15 and 16.

In this specification I will term the windings 11 mainline coils, the windings 1 2 opposing, coils and the windings 13 ac celerating coils, and will term coils l2 and 13, collectively, auxiliary electromagnetic means. Thev windings 11 are, as shown, in the main line circuit 6; the windings 12 are in a local circuit branch (traced hereafter) and controlled by the contact stops 8 and 9 and armature lever 7; and the windings 13 are also in a local circuit branch. The pars ticular function of theopposing windings or coils 12 is to develop a polarity of magnetism that, shall always be opposed to the magnetism created by the main line coils 11, the magnetism created by the-opposing COIlS 12 not being so strong, however as that created by the working current of. the main line 6 in coils 11. The particular function of the accelerating coils 13 is to carry the armature -7 across the gap between stops 8 and 9, once the armature lever 7 has been set in motion as hereinafter described.

Fig. 1 shows the apparatus with its movable parts in the positions occupied with the transmitting key 1 in contact with contact stop 2, and with the apparatus at rest. Ar rows indicate therelative directions of flow of current with the parts at restin the positions shown. As indicated by such arrows, J

the current from generator 4 in main line 6 tends to hold armature lever 7 to the left in contact with stop 8.

There is a local generator 18 supplying current to the opposing coils 12 as follows from the ,positive pole of generator 18 (negative pole grounded, in the arrangement shown) through balancing resistance 19 to 20-and thence through coil 21 of local relay 14 to resistance R thence through such resistance R and coil 22 of relay 14 to opposing coils 12, and through those coils to contact stop 8, and thence through armature lever 7 to ground at 23. The current from generator-18 through the opposite balancing resistance, 24, passes directly to ground at 23 through armature lever 7, and does not affect the opposing coils 12; but because of resistance 24, the'circuit through such resistance 24 does not completely short the circuit, as traced above, through re sistance 19. The current through opposing coils 12, causes those coils to oppose, with respect to' the armature 7, the action of the main line current in coils 11 on that armature; but since the influence of coils 12 upon armature lever 7 is normally less than that of coils 11, energized by the main line current, armature 7 remains stationary in the position shown. Normally, there is no current through accelerating coils 13. But when the predominating influence of the mainline current is removed (as when the transmitting key 1 is moved toward stop 3), thcYmagnetizatmn induced by oppos ing Cells 12 forces armature lever 7 away from the stop 8 and toward the stop 9. There is a condenser 25 bridged across the resistance R by the local circuit conductor 26, whichilobal circuit passes through accelerating coils 13. The instant armature lever 7 leaves contact stop 8 the current energizing opposing coils 12 ceases, and at this instant condenser 25 discharges. This discharge divides, one portion passing through resistance R, and the othe'rthrough coil 21 of local relay 14, point 20, resistances19 and 24, opposing coils 12 and coil 22 of local relay'14. Both portions re-unite so that the total discharge passes through acceleratof the discharge passing through opposing coils 12 is such that this portion tends to oppose the movement of armature lever 7 toward its stop 9; but the reunited portions forming the. Whole discharge pass through accelerating coils 13 in such a direction thattheir preponderating effect tends to carry armature lever 7 over to its stop 9 with a force that renders the armature less afiected by inductive distubances in line 6 or elsewhere that would otherwise aflect movement of said armature lever 7. (The relative relations of the circuit branches for opposing coils 12 and accelerating coils 13 and condenser 25,will be more apparent from Fig. 2, from which it will be seen that the opposing coils 12 and magnet coils 21 and 22 of the secondary relay 14 are in a branch circuit bridged across the two conductors containing resistances 1.9 and 24 and leading from one pole of generator 18 to opposing contact stops 8 and. 9; and that the resistance R on theoue hand, and the accelerating coils 13 and condenser on the other hand, are connected in parallel and in shunt With respect one to the other, in this bridged circuit branch), c

It Will thus be seen. that the movement of the armature lever 7 may be completed before the movement of the transmltting key 1 is completed; that the movement of armature lever 7 may actually begin before transmitting key 1 has made contact with its stop 2 3, and before the next signaling impulse to which such movement of the armature lever 7 corresponds, has even begun.

Auxiliary or repeating or secondary relay 14: is actuated the discharge of the con-' denser and since this discharge begins when armature 7 begins to move, the secondary relay operates almost- Without lag with respect to armature '7.

Armature 7 having made contact with stop 9, the current from generator 18 is established through the opposing coils 12 and the magnetic coils of relav 1 1, in a direction opposite to its former direction; a. a, is established through balancing resistance 24, conductors 27 and 28, coils 12, coil 22 of relay l l, resistance R, coil 21 of relay 14, and conductor 29, to contact stop 9 and thence through armatitlre lever '7 to ground. at ldeanwi'iile transmitting key 1 has made contact with stop 3. The condenser 25, having charged immediately upon the reestablishment of on rent flow from the generr'itor 18 is in conditi 11 to act again from reverse movement of transmitting key 1 from stop '3 to stop 2. In such reverse movement the action isprecisely similar to thatabove described, the current in the *opposlng code 12 being reversed immediately al'terthe an mature lever 7 leaves the stop 9, due to a portion of the discharge of condenser 25;

throughthe opposing coils 12,

the entire discharge passes through acceler ating coils 13 so tending to carry the armature lever 7 over against the contact stop. 8.

Because, during its movement, the ar1nature 7 is under the influence of the accelerating coils, the instrument is practically free from disturbance due to, inductive. interference-and the like. Because the armatures 7 and li' tend -to'1no.ve, in correspondence With any movement of the corresprmding transmitter, immediately after that transmitter begins to move, lag in the operation of the instrument is almost entirely avoided and thereby the operation of the circuit is very greatly quickened. A. fur ther important advantage of these instruments is that there is very little, it any, tendency to spark, or are, at the relay contact points 8 and 9; which contact points can, therefore, be adjusted more closely for high speed work than is the case with ordinary relays. This immunity from sparking and its consequences, is due to the fact that in is a characteristic of the ordinary shunted condenser,arrangement), is almost entirely obviated.

In the accompanying drawings for the Sake of slrnphclty the connections are shown for simplex working; but it obvious that .the relay .may be provided for diti'erential coils, in the ordinary manner, to adapt it to duplex workmg.

There is an instrument of the prior art.

known as the Gulstad relay, and described in The EZectricaZ Review (liondoul in two series of articles beginning in volume 42. page 751, dated June 3, 1828, and in volume 51, page 294, dated August 22, lllllil. \\'ll rein the magnets are 'n-ovidcd, not only \Vlll main line coils, but also with local circuit coils to which are connected condensers and I resistances; the said local CllCllliS being connccted, between the spools of tho magnets, to the armature of the relay. and so, when said armature is against one of its stops or the other, (such stops being connected, respectively, to batteries of opposite polarity) to a source of current supply, tl e polarity of such current depending on the stop with which the armature in contact; the eliectivc result being that when the current in the main line dies down a current already flowing through a local circuit muses the relay armature to leave the stop withwhicli it has been in contact, and to move toward the opposite stop; and as soon as sucharmature leaves the stop with which it-has been in contact, a condenser discharges through a local circuit in a direction to hasten the movement of the armature toits opposite stop and to'hold it against such opposite stop'when it arrives there. Immediately thereafter a current of opposite direction is established in a local circuit, tending to reverse the armature again; but in the mean time the main line current has been established in a direction to holdthe armature against the stop which it has just reached,

and the weaker local circuit influence cannot reverse the armature until the current I in the main line begins to die down, as incidentto another reversal of the main line current.

Among the features which distingush my improved relay above described from the Gulstad relay are the following:

'In the Gulst'ad relay it is necessary that the tongue of the relay shall play between contact stops which are connected respec tively to sources of current supply of opposite polarities. This leads to sparking between such stops and the moving tongue'or armature of the relay. In my relay herein describedi however, since both contact stops 8 and 9 of the relay are connected. to the same pole of the generatorlS, these contact steps may be adjusted very closely, without sparking, thus reducing the amplitude of vibration of the armature, as compared with what is possible in the Gulstad relay, and permitting very much higher speed of open ation.

In my improved relay above described, the circuit of the accelerating coils-.13 and the opposing coils 12 is. an entirely local. circuit; it is substantially unaffected by line conditions, and in it any potential, any capacity, and any resistance may be used, as conditions may dictate. 'In the Gulstad re- .lay, however, the local circuits are connected to the outgoing line, derive their cur-- rent from line, and are restricted as to potential and capacity employed by incoming f and outgoing line conditions.

In order that the Gulstad relay may pro:

duce a'local record, it is necessary that. the

contact tongue of the relay shall have com pleted its travel, and shall have contacted with the contact stop on the opposing side, before the starting of the record begins; whereas inmy relay herein described, the making of the local. record is started, (2'. a, the-reversal of the armature 17 is started), the instant the armature lever 7 lcavesthat stop, 8 or 9, with which it has been in contact, and the reversal of the armature 17 may be completed before the reversal of the armature y; is'completed,

It mig t v supplyingi currents of the same polarity to contact pints 8 and 9 of the main relay of the movement of the secondary relay 14 is very rapid indeed; for

my instrument, sparking -"thereis avoided,

the difficulty has merelybeen transferred to the contact points of the secondary relay 14.

which reason the armature 17 breaks contact very quickly; and because of suchv quick breaking of contact, thecontact points coacting with this armature may be set up closely, so permitting a very high rate of operation of this secondary relay.

What I claim is I 1. A polarized relay or like electric instrument adapted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature and opposing contacts therefor,

means arranged to influence said armature,

arranged to influence such armature, and entirely local circuit means and current supply means for such auxiliary means, controlled by said armature and its contacts and'arranged to cause'sucl'i auxiliary means nor mally to oppose as to said armature the influence of the main circuit electromagnetic means and comprising also capacity arranged. to cause such auxiliary means to influence the armature to carry it across once motion of that armature is started, current potential of the same sign being applied to both said contacts.

2. A polarized relay or like electric instrument adapted for actuation by reversal of ized' armature and opposing contacts therefor, ma1n-c1rcu1t electro-magneticmeans arranged to influence said armature, auxiliary electromagnetic means likewisearranged to influence such armature, and entirely local armature and its contacts and arranged to cause such auxlliary means normally to op main circuit electro magnetic circuit means and current supply means for such auxiliary means, controlled by sa1d pose as to. said armature the influence of the main circuit electromagnetic means and comprising also capacity arranged tov cause such auxiliary means to influence the armature to carry it across once motion of that armature is started, current potential of the.

same sign being applied to both said contacts, and a secondary instrument included in such local circuit means and arranged to be actuated upon movement of such armature. possibly be thought While, by

3. A olarized relay or like electric instrument a apted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a mam circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature and opposing contacts therefor, main circuit electro magnetic meansarranged to influence said armature,

a auxiliary electromagnetic means likewise arranged to influence such armature, and entirely local circuit means and current supply means for such auxiliary means, controlled by said armature and its contacts and arranged to-cause such auxiliary means nor mally to oppose as to said armature the influence of the main circuit electrd'magnetic means and comprising also capacity arranged to cause such auxiliary means to in- 5 fluencc the armature to carry it across once motion. of that armature is started, current potential of the same sign being applied to both said contacts, and a secondary instrument included in such local 'circuitmeans ac and arranged to be actuated by discharge of such capacity.

4. A polarized relay or like electric instrument'adapted for actuation by reversal of 'olarity in a main circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature, main-circuit electro magnetic means arranged to influence said armature, auxiliary electro-magnetic means likewise arranged to influence such armature, and entirely local circuit means and current supply means for such auxiliary means, arr-an ed to cause such auxiliary means normal y to oppose as to said armature the influence of the main circuit electro- 55 magnetic means and comprising also capacity arranged by its discharge to cause such auiriliary means to influence the armature to carry it across once motion of that armature is started. and a transmitterin 40 cluded in such local circuit means and ar polarized armature and opposing contacts therefor, main circuit electro magnetic means arranged to influence such armature,

opposing electro-magnetic means and accelcrating electro-magnetic means each likewise arranged to influence such armature, and en-' tirely local circuit means and current supply means for such 0 posin and accelerating means, controlled by sai armature and its "contacts'and arranged to cause such oppos ing means normally to oppose as to said arm ture the influence, of the main circuit electromagnetic means, and comprising also means to cause such accelerating means to influence the armature to carry it across once motion oil that armature is started, current potential of the same sign being applied to both said contacts.

6. A polarized relay or like electric instrug strumcnt adapted for actuation by ment adapted for actuation byreversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature and opposing contacts therefor, main circuit electro-magnetic means arranged to influence such armature, opposing electro-magnetic means and accelerating clectro-magnetic means each likewise arranged to influence such armature, and entirely local circuit means and current supply means for such opposing and accelerating means, controlled by said armature and its contacts and arranged to cause such opposing means normally to oppose as to said armature the influence of the main circuit electro-magnetic means, and comprising also capacity arranged by its discharge to causesuch accelerating means to influence the armature to carry it across once motion of that armature is started, current potential of the same sign being applied to both said contacts.

7. A combination relay or like electric instrument comprising two relays, one controlied'by the other, the first of said relays having a polarized armature and main circuit electro-magnetic means arranged to influence said armature, andhaying also auxiliary elcc tro-magnetic means likewise arranged to influence such armature and circuit means therefor whereby said armature iscau'sed to move to reverse its positionupon diminution' of the main line current to a predetermined degree, and in advance of establishment of such main line current in an opposite direction, the second of said relays arranged] to be operated toreverse position of its armature upon beginning oi. move ment of the armature of the first mentioned relay and in advance of completion of the reversal of the armature-of such first men-- tioned relay.

8. Apolarized relay or like electric inreversal of polarity in a'main circuitnto which it may be connected, and comprising a mow .able polarized armature, main-circuit electro-magnetic means arranged to influence said armature, opposing contacts with which such armature will contact in opposite, positions, a source of current supply, two circuit branches connecting one pole of such source of current su ply, the one to the one said contact and the other to the other said contact, each of such circuit branches containing resistance, auxiliary electromagnetic means likewise arranged to influence said armature, a circuit branch containing said auxiliary means bridged across the two contacts, and a condenser and a resistance shunt therefor, both included in such bridged circuit branch,

9. A polarized relay or like electric insti'ument adapted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it and - of current supply, 'the one to the one said contact and the other to the other, said contact, eachpf such circuit branches containing resistance, opposing and accelerating electro-magnetic means likewise arranged to influence said armature, a circuit branch containing said opposing and accelerating means and bridged across the two contacts,

the said bridged circuit branch connected to said opposing and accelerating means to causethem to influence the armature o positely, a condenser included in said bri ged circuit branch, around such condenser and accelerating means.

10. A polarized relay or like electric instrument adapted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it may beponnected, and comprising a movable polarized armature, main-circuit electro-magnetic means arranged to influence said armature, opposing contacts with which such ar-v mature will contact in opposite positions, a source of current supply, two circuit branches connecting one pole of suchsource of current supply, the one to the one said contact and the other to the other said contact, each of such clrcuit branches contain ing resistance, auxiliary electromagnetic means likewise arranged to influence said armature a circuit branch containing said auxiliary means and bridged across the,two contacts, a condenser and a resistance shunt therefor, both included in such bridged circuit branch, and a secondary electric instrument having controlling magnet coils in said bridged circuit branch and arranged to be energized by current passing therethrough.

1].. A polarized relay or like electric instrument adapted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature, main-circuit electro-magnetic means arranged to influence said armature, opposing, contacts with which such armature will contact in opposite positions, a

source of current supply, two circuit branches connecting one pole of such source of current supply, the one to the one said contact and the other to the other saidcontact, each of such'circuit branches containing resistance, auxiliary electro-magnetic means likewise arranged to influence said armature, a circuit .branch containing said auxiliary means and bridged across the two and a resistance shunt contacts, a condenser and a resistance shunt therefor, both included in such bridged-cir- BIA-polarized relay or like electric instrument adapted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature, main-circuit electro-magnetic means arranged to influence such armature, opposing contacts with which such armature will contact in opposite positions, opposing and accelerating electro-magnetic means likewisear'ranged to influence such ar mature, and a circuit therefor including a source of current supply and a condenser, such circuit connected to said 'contact points in such manner that current potential of the same sign is applied to both contact points, the circuit arrangement being such that the opposing electro-magnetic means normally opposes, as to the armature, the influence of the main circuit electro-magnetic means, the direction of influence of the opposing electro-magnetic means and the polarity of the charge of the condenser being reversed by a reversal of position of the armature, and

that the accelerating means is energized by discharge of the condenser consequent upon breaking of contact by said armature with either of its said contacts. 7

13. A polarized relay or like electric instrument adapted for actuation by reversal of polarity in a main circuit to which it may be connected, and comprising a movable polarized armature, main-circuit electro-mag netic means arranged to influence said armature, opposing contacts with which such armature will contact in opposite positions, a source of current supply, two circuit branches connecting one pole of such source of current supply, the one to the one said contact and the other to the other said contact, each of such circuit branches containing resistance, auxiliary electro-magnetic means likewise arranged to influence said armature, a circuit branch containing said auxiliary means and bridged across the two mg witnesses.

Witnemes:

PAUL H. FRANKE, MAY I. TnIMBLn.

.WILLIAM FINN.

presence of two subscrib-