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Publication numberUSRE16599 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1927
Filing dateSep 12, 1924
Publication numberUS RE16599 E, US RE16599E, US-E-RE16599, USRE16599 E, USRE16599E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rmatt
US RE16599 E
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Re, 16 599 Apnl 19, 1927. R. MATTICE METHOD 0 i e 2mm.

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Original io., 1,l,009, dated July 18, lllfi lerl'll 10,737,811; fled September 18, 1984. Application, reissue Med January I, 1M7. 'Ierlal no. 168,811.

, This invention relates to a method of re- '0 structures by welding. Heretofore cracked, fractured or broken '5 structures have been' repaired by forming a mechanical'patch; bolts, cap like empl' ed, but this method presents many disa vantages in that an operator or repair man would often-times twist in the heads 01f of the cap screws, strip the bolt threads or break the bolt, and sometimes the bolt would have a loose fit resulting in twisting thereof and precluding the tighten- 'ingof the patch. l urther, it has been found that frequently insullicient space prohibited the use of bolts,

ca screws or the like.

it is therefore one object of this invention to obtain a shrink fit in the repairing of 0 cracked, fractured or broken metallic'struc- .tures.

It is a further object of this invention to overcome the before mentioned disadvan- It is a still further ob ect of this mvention to secure a stron joint between plates or sheets in a quick e cient manner, whereby to repair cracked, fractured or broken metallic structures.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method of weldin together plates or other metallic articles wl ereby to repair the same.

The invention is illustrated b way of example, in the accompanying rawings', in

which:

Figure 1 is a cross sectional view through a broken metallic structure.

Fi 2 is a cross sectional view through a bro en metallic structure, showing the first ste in the method.

ig. 3 is a cross sectional view through a broken metallic structure showing the second ste in the method. ig. 4 is a cross sectional view throu h a broken metallic structure showing the nal step in the method.

Fig. 5 is a fra ent'ary front elevation of a stationary engine showing a modification of the invention,-and

Figs. 6 and 7 are sectional views on the line H of Fig. 5 showin successive steps in the method of the modi cation shown in Fig. .5.

Referring now more pai'ticularly to' the airing cracked, fractured or broken metalscrews or the which in the instance 7 or otherwise form a number of openings 4 in quarter of an inch less than the thickness se m-.599

drawings, in which similar characters of referencedesignate similar parts inthesev eral views, A desi natesa piece ofmetal of 1 any structure which has a portion-thereof broken, the two sections being designated as 1 and 2, while 3 indicates the line of'break, shown is of irregular contour.

As the first step in my method of'repair ing the broken structure, provided the sections 1 and 2 are complementary, I first drillsection 2, which openings are then counter sunk as shown at 5; each countersink preferably extending to a depth about one of section 2 at the place being drilled. This depth has been found satisfactory in practice, but of course, the depth of the countersinkma'y vary in accordance with the particular job; and I do not limit this invention to any specific depth of countersink.

When the openings have been counter sunk, the section 2 is placed in position. against section 1, and held thereagainst in any suitable manner, whereupon openings 6 are drilled or otherwise formed, in section' 1, which openings are aligned, obviously, with openings 4; section 2 serving as a master late or template.

' he openings are then ta ped or threaded .asshown at 7 the templatel ieing removed if necessary, and then threaded studs 8 are secured within said openings, see Fi 3.

' .The drawing illustrates the stu s 8 as secured within'the openings by being threaded therein; the studs thus being held within the openings in a mechanical manner. The studs are secured directly to the plate 1 in a mechanical manner. in contradistinction'to an arrangement whereby the studs may be held to or within a plate by added means, .such for example, as the means shown in the British patent to the Quasi-Arc Company, No.'114,268 of 1918, in which patent the studs are secured to the plate by means of welding material; thestuds thus being indirectly secured to the plate. By the use of I the word mechanically I do not infer or mean that the studs are placed in position by mechanical apparatus, such for example, as a welding machine, but I mean that the studs in their secured position in the plate a pluralit o a non-ductile plate ma are retained mechanically position.

In ractice it has been found advisable to .provi e studs of such length that they'extend into section 2 at least one uarter of an inch beyond the lowest line o countersink. It has been found in practice, also, that ductile studs are highly satisfactory but obviously, substantially non-ductile studs may be used within the spirit and scope of the invention.

Plates 1 and 2 being in the position shown in Fig. 2 with studs 8 in place, I now weld the studs 8 to plate or section 2, and the welding is continued until the entire countersink is filled as shown in Fi 4 at 9. It will be notedthat in reality a ead 9 has been formed on stud 8, the head becoming an integral part of section 2 and stud 8.

Inasmuch as section 2 and stud 8 are both heated during the welding, upon cooling section 2 contracts and a shrink fit thereof to section 1 is obtained. O

Following the welding, any surplus'metal at the weld may be removed in any suitable manner to finish off the surface adjacent the weld, thus eliminating any protruding metal.

Referring now to Figs. 5, 6, and 7, the numeral 10 designates a portion of a stationary engine which is cracked or fractured as shown at'11. It is impossible to remove one section from the other so I first seal the crack as shown at 12, preferably by removing metal adjacent the crack to form a V, and. then welding the V. It is not always necessary to seal the crack, but it has been found advisable under many conditions.

I then obtain a plate 1.3 of suitable shape for the repair 'ob, and drill therethrough openings 14 which are countersun as shown at 15 in a manner similauto those heretofore described.

Next, I take plate 13 and temporarily position it a inst the surface 10 and drill openings in t esurface 10 which are aligned with the-openings 14; plate 13 serving as a template. It has been found that by providing a plate 13 formed of ductile weldable material, highly satisfactory results are obtained, but I do not limit myself to the use'of a plate of this character as obviously be employed within the spirit and scope o the invention.

Studs 16 are secured in the openings in the surface 10, said studs extending into the plate 13, as shown. The studs are then welded to the-plate 13 as described heretofore and anysurplus metal is removed from the welds to finish off the exterior surface. It will be apparent that the plate 13 bridges the crack or fracture 11 and any stresses or strains to which the repaired structure may be subjected are transmitted to the plate 13, the, latter serving as the bridging element,

in such secured a mechanically securing studs' to the finally welding by. reason of its connection with the surface 10 This invention has been practiced b electric welding for the reason that e ectric welding may be accurately controlled and 1. The method of joining metal plate's or 'the like which comprises forming countersunk perforations in one of said plates, other plate, said studs being aligned with the aforesaid perforations, superposing the perforated plate on the other plate with the studs of the latter extended into the perfora tions, and then welding the studs to the superposed plate to fill the countersinks whereby to form a welded head on each of said studs.

2. The method of repairing cracked or broken structures which comprises securing studs in said structure, said structure providingthe holdingmeans for said studs, superposing a perforated plate on said structure to bridge the crack or break with the studs extending into the perforations, and

tions.

3. The 'method of repairing cracked or broken structures which comprises securing studs in said structure, said structure providing the holding means for said studs, superposing a perforated plate on said structure to bridge the crack or break with the studs extending into the perforations, and finally filling said perforations with welding material to form a head on each of saidstuds to unite the superposed plate, therewith.

4. The method of welding together sections of broken metallic structures which consists in forming countersunk perforations in one of the sections, forming tapped apertures in the other section, securing studs in said tapped apertures, superposing the perforated section on the other section with the studs positioned in said perforations, and finally electrically welding the portions of the studs within the perforations to said perforated section in the countersunk perforatiions to form a head at the end of each stu 5. The method of'repairing cracked metallic structures which consists in sealing the crack, forming a plurality of rforations in a plate, forming a plurality of fecesses in the cracked structure which align with the perforations in said plate, securing studs disaid studs to said perform llu ' therein, said rec co the cracked structure which 1th weldi the cracked structure which ali perforations in said plate, securingstuds in.

1 1 in size with said studs whereby the latter are aligned with each other and with the aforesaid perforatoins, super-posing the plate on 'the cracked structure with the studs extending into the perforations, and finally welding the studs to said plate.

crack, forming a plurality of perforations in a plate, forming a plurality of recesses in with the perforations in said plate, securing studs directlyto the cracked structure in the recesses therein, saidrecesses corresponding in size with the studs whereby the latter are aligned with each other and with the aforesaid ,per-

forations," superposin the plate on the cracked'structu're'wit the studs extending 'into the 'perforations, and finally electrically T the studs to said plate.

tallic structures which, comprises sealing the crack, forming a plurality of perforations in a plate, forming a plurality of recesses in with the the in the cracked structure, said receases being so. formed as -'to align the studs with each other and with the aforesaid perforati'ons, superposin the plate on the cracked structure witfi the studsextending into the perforations, and finally electrically I eidi; j said yailate whereby to form a ead 'on-each of sai studs.

' '8'. A plate having a crack or break therein, 7 ductile projecting members mechanically se- :cured't ereto on each side of said crack or break, and a substantially ductile plateweldto said pro'ecting members and bridging said crack or 6. The method of repairing cracked me- J tallic structures which'consistsjn sealing the reek. 9. A plate having a crack or .break therein, proi'ectmg members mechanically secured in sai plate on each side ofsaid crack or break, and a second plate a'rran ed adjacent said first named plate and we ded to said projecting members and bridging said crack or. break to transmit strains to which said first named late issubjected from the relectin'gniem rs ononeside of the crac or reak to the'projec members on the other side of the crack or leak.

10. The method of, joinin metal plates or the like which comprises orming perforations in one ofisaid plates, securing project-' 0 method of repairing cracked me-.

ing studs in the other plate, said plate pro-v viding the holdi means for said studs whereby said stu are 'tively aligned with each other and with 51: perforations in the first mentioned plate, then superposin'g the perforated plate on said second named plate with the -studs extending into the perforations therein, and finally welding the studs to. the rforated plate to fill the countel-sinks an form a head on each of said studs.

ROYAL MATTICE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5090610 *Apr 12, 1991Feb 25, 1992Bernt Jorgen OKiln liner
US5469617 *Aug 21, 1992Nov 28, 1995The Welding InstituteFriction forming
US6171415Sep 3, 1998Jan 9, 2001Uit, LlcWelding metal product, induction a surface site, establish a wave energy frequency and decreasing internal ultrasonic wave energy magnitude
US6230958 *Apr 11, 2000May 15, 2001Lockheed Martin CorporationFriction pull plug welding: dual chamfered plate hole
US6253987 *Apr 10, 2000Jul 3, 2001Lockheed Martin CorporationFriction pull plug welding: top hat plug design
US6460750May 2, 2000Oct 8, 2002Edmond R. ColettaFriction pull plug welding: chamfered heat sink pull plug design
US6880743Oct 8, 2002Apr 19, 2005Lockheed Martin CorporationFriction pull plug welding: chamfered heat sink pull plug design
US7276824Dec 21, 2005Oct 2, 2007U.I.T., L.L.C.Oscillating system and tool for ultrasonic impact treatment
US7301123Apr 29, 2004Nov 27, 2007U.I.T., L.L.C.Method for modifying or producing materials and joints with specific properties by generating and applying adaptive impulses a normalizing energy thereof and pauses therebetween
US7344609Dec 1, 2004Mar 18, 2008U.I.T., L.L.C.Quality, long service life structural materials having relaxed residual stress patterns and reformed grain boundaries
US7431779Jun 28, 2005Oct 7, 2008U.I.T., L.L.C.Ultrasonic impact machining of body surfaces to correct defects and strengthen work surfaces