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Publication numberUSRE16707 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1927
Filing dateSep 16, 1921
Publication numberUS RE16707 E, US RE16707E, US-E-RE16707, USRE16707 E, USRE16707E
InventorsB. B. Kahn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heater
US RE16707 E
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

HEATER Aug. 16,1927. B'KAHN Re.16 ,707

Original Filed Sept. 16. 1921 6 sheetsfsheet 1 u llli i B5B. KAHNQ Ail 16, 1927,

HEATER Orizinal Filed Sept. 16, 1921 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 B. B. KAHN Aug. 16, 1927.

' HEATER Original File d Sept 16. 1921 s sheets-sheet 5 V IIIIIIIIIIA'IIII'IIII'MIIII Aug.' 16,1927 I KAHN Re. 16,707

- HEATER Original Fild Sept. 16. 1921 6 sheets sheet 4 r 3 i 74 4 iii B. B. KAHN HEATER Aug. 16, 1927.

Original Filed Sept. 16, 1921 s Sheets-Sheet a B. B. KAH N HEATER Original Filed Sept. 16, 1921 B sheets sheet 6 aw A... 16, 1927.

UNITED S A S m'rnma s lam Paxrsrrr OFFICE.

original Io. 1mm, dated my :0, 191:, Serial Io.,501,100,.fled september s, ion. mass m reissue fled Kay 85, 1885. :Serlal 10. 38,852.

My invention relates to heaters, and is concerned with the provision of a portable heater of. distinctive and pleasing appearance adapted to be placed-in a living room, for

I example, and characterized by certain novel features of construction and by an improved plan of operation hereinafter fully described.- A description of'my invention will best he understood when read in connection with the 10 illustrative drawings;-hence I shall proceed at once to describe the accompanying drawings in which Fig.1 is a front elevational view of the "heaterof my, invention, 15 Fig. 2 is a side elevational view thereof,

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 33, of Fig. 5, H

Fig. 41is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 4-.4, of Fig; 5, Fig. 5 is a-horizontal sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4, Fig. 6 is a fragmentary rear elevational view, Fig. 7 is a fragmentary section taken on a the line 77 of Fig. 6, Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line- 8-8 of Fig. 5, Fig. 9 is a fragmentary p'lan section on line 99 of 2, 3 Fig. 10 is a plan view taken substantially on line 10- 10 of Fig. dshowing the base a and ash box and shaker mechanism, but omitting the fire pot and side walls of the stove cabinet, 4 Fig.'11 is a plan detail section of the grate j [dumping mechanism, and

Fig. 12 illustrates a modified embodiment of my invention. i Similar characters of reference refer. to

' v f! similar parts throughout the several views.

The comprises the cast iron fire not 15-, whichis carried uponash boxcasting 16, from which is suspended the grate hereinafter described in detail. The ash box f indicated at 16 contains avv suitable ash an and the ashbox 'inthe usual manner so as. to

is provided with; door 18 whic is furnish a substantially air tight closure.

Door 18' is provided with a pair offscrew f draft registers 19-19 bymeans of which admission of air to the ash box can be easily and accurately. controlled.

' The lower forward of the asli mgedly mounted-upon the forward end ofv casting rests directly upon the base20, as is clearly illustrated in Fig. 4. The ash box casting is provided with an into 1' 21, which extends around the baci sides thereof and is provided with a shoulder, which coacts with corresponding shoulders 22 formed on the upperedges of the Eack, sides, and a, portion of the front of the ase.

Resting upon the fire pot 15 and securely attached thereto through the medium of an anti-buckling ring 23 .is a sheet metal drum .or cmcnma'rr, omo,ass1onoa m m 001- 1 mean, one, A coaromrmn or 01:10. v

aron and th- 24. The drum 24 is provided with a fuel intake opening 25 into which are fitted and riveted the flanged inner edges of the feed door frame 26. The forward edges 26 of the door frame'26 are inwardly flan to provide a seat for the rearwardly pro ecting peripheral flange 27 of the feed door.

The feed door is formed in two parts, the 75 lower being indicated by28 and the upper b 29. -A swinging curtain 30 hingedly depen s from the lower edge of the u per door 29 in such manner that, when the ower door 28 I is opened, it normally prevents the escape of smoke into the room but will be swun back by the impact of fuel being fed throug the door. I

It often happens in putting fuel into the stovethat stray pieces of fuel are accidentally dropped to the floor. I have efiectually guarded against this by the provision of a fuel chute 31 pivoted tothe bottom of the door frame 26' as shown at 32 (Fig. 4). Chute 31 is provided at its ends with triangular flanges 33'33'which lie adjacent but spaced from the sides of the doorframe and which in turn' carry lateral shoulders 84 along the inner ends. When the feed door 28 is opened for the admission offuel, chute 31 is allowed to fall by gravity until shoulders 34-34 catch upon'the inwardly projecting flange 26 of the door frame as indicated bv dotted lines in Fig. 4. As the door 28 is closed, the forward ed ofchute 31 engages the cammed guide strip 35 which is-secured to the inner face of feed door 28. Inthis manner the forward edge of the chute is forced upward by the closing of the feed door, until the edge rests. beneath'the rearwardly projecting lug'35' on the upper end of the guide strip 35, which pzevents the center of gravity pf the chute past its pivotal axis,

Y The drum is riv'eted orotherwise secured to acast iron cover 36, which is provided with an integral stub smoke pi e 37 and a central orifice 38. Secured to to cover 36 and depending from the edges of the orifice 38 thereof is an inverted substantially Y- shaped pipecomprising the vertical passage 39 and the branches 4040. The outer ends of the branches communicate with the exteri'or of the drum, an air tight 'joint'being effected by the aid of flangedrings 41.

It will be noted that all of the parts thus far described-which lie above the base 20 are enclosed within a substantially square casing which comprises the base 20,21 top 42, a front plate 43, a rear -45. 'As is obvlousfrom the drawin the use of a square casing around a cylindrical heating part] rovides increased s ace for the passage of the air to be heate due to the heating of the casing by radiation of heat from the heatingpart, additional heat transferring surface is provided. The lates 43, 44, and 45-45 are preferably ormed of sheet iron or steel. strengthened by embossed panels 46, the lower edges of rear plate 44, and side plates 45 45 being received in the channel strips 47, the latter resting u on the shoulders 22 of base 20, between the edges of the apron 21' andbead 48 which surrounds the upper periphery of 20. The inner sides of the channel base strips '47 are extended obliquely, as indicated at 47, and through this wing the channel isrivetedto the border of the apron 21. Channelstrips 47 extendalong the side and rear edges'of the ash box a ron, but are omitted along the front'edge, t e front plate 43 of the cabinet resting directly upon the shoulder 22 and adjacent the bead 48 of the front side of base 20. The central portion 3 of the, lower margin of the front plate merely lies over and inclose contact with that portion of the ash box which, acts as the ash oor frame (Fig 4).

- the channel strips 47 attached to the apron 21, 1 have effected considerable facility in assembling and disassembling the heater, as the ash box'and associated fire pot and drum may be lifted'together with the assembled casing on or ofi the base 20 in a single oparation. f T r V v The upperedges of plates 43 44, and 45 45 lie within the lip '42 of the dome 42. I The dome is supported on posts 49'49 which rest u on the upper surface of .drumcover 36. e dome is rovided on, its four sides with a plurality '0 slots 50-450 and-with the rear o ning 51 to receive the flue section 52.

Inc section 52 has a-mitre fitting with the stub flue 37 of th'e drum cover36 and is held to the latter'by means of lugs 52 and 37 373 projecting inwardly from the respective ,flues. 1n such manner'tha't the flue section 52 may easily be reversed as shown in dotted plate 44, and side plates Through the use of' lines in Fig. 4, to lead to a vertical smoke pipe rather than to a pipe extending directly backward to a wall behind the heater.

Acentrally located orifice 53 in thetop 1 of the dome 42 is provided with an annular shoulder 54 into which is normally fitted a grid plate 55. This allows the superheated air from the Y-shaped pipe 39 to be discharged directly upward into theroom.

Referring now particularly to Figures 5,

plates 43, 44, and 4545 are provided with la'teral'flanges 56 56 which lie-at angles of 45 degrees to the planes of the plates. Abutting flanges 5656 are secured together at a plurality of vertically spaced points, the bolts or rivets 57 also passing through laterally extending L-sha d brackets 58.

7B .8, and 9,it will be noted that the casing A corner strip 59 oft 1e U-shaped crosssection overlies and conceals each pair of abutting flanges, strips 59 also lying at an angle of 45 degrees to the planes of the casing plates. Retaining screws 60 pass through the arch of. the U strips and are threaded into the short legs of the L brackets j 58, holding the legs of.the U strips tightly against the casing plates. At their top and bottom extremities, the corner strips 59 are reduced to a. right angled cross section. at

which points the flanges 56 of thecabinet plates are discontinued.

The front plate 43 is provided with'a'n opening which registers with the feed door frame 26. and the metal of the front plate is preferably turned inwardly around the adjacent surfaces of the frame, as is clearly illustrated in Fig. 4.- This inturned flange of plate 43 is normally spaced somewhat from the upper margin of the door frame in order that the latter may move upwardly'a fraction of an inch when the door frame is carried upwardly by the vertical expansion of thedrum 24, fire pot 15, and associated "parts, without disturbin the casing plates as they rest in channels4 upon the base 20.

The margins of the doors 28 and 29, however, are extended (seeFigs. 4 and 5) 'so that at all times the. door openings are tight;

ly closed. The front plate is provided with suitable apertures through which project the door'hinge ears 6161 which are formedintegral with frame 26.. Ears 61-61 coo crate with correspondingears 6262 forme upon the doors 28 and 29,

The casing in practice is coated with vitreous enamel, or similar material which may be'suitably colored and rained. This aids in givingjthe heater a pleasing appearance and enables it :to be cleaned merely by dusting the surface of the casing which is substantially smooth.

lstinctive and f The grate consists of an annular frame 63 supported on a plurality of lugs '64 depend ing from the ash box casting 16. De ndi ng from the frame 63 are a plurality of rackets 'trunnions 69. carrying grate dampers 70.

In order that the shaker ring 66 may be reciprocated from outside the heater casing,

it is provided with a slotted arm 71 pivoted to an arm 72 whichis secured to an arm 73, connected to a link 74. The link 74 is pivotall secured to a pivoted crank 7 5 to whic an operating arm 76 outside the casing 'is'also secured. The pivot of crank 7 5 is supported by a frame 77 mounted on the ash box casting 16 and extends through an opening 78 in the front wall of'the casing, the up er edge of the opening being spaced from t e axis 75 in order to permit upward movement of the axis by reason of expansion of the inner parts of the heater. The front ends of the trunnions 69 of the grate dumpers 7O carry intermeshing gears 75), and one of the trunnions is extended forwardly and terminates in a tapering four sided terminal 80. The terminal 80 is engaged by a similarly formed socket .81, journaled in the door.

18 and bearing outside the door a squared head 82. By this construction the grate may be dumped from outside the cabinet and at I the same time. the door 18 may be 0 ened when desired, and when again close the terminal '80 will; again be operatively received in the socket 81. v

I prefer to uip the heater of my invention with a hot last attachment of the type shown in Figures 3, 4 and 5.. The hot blast attachment com rises a pair of hollow castings 8383, which are disposed within and secured to the" lower portion of the drum 24, and provided with a plurality of tuyeres 84, which discharge downwardly into the fire pot.

I Communicating with and formed integral with, or attached to, the castings 8383' isa conduit 85 of inverted U shape, which, at its upper end, is rovided with an air intake opening 86, w ich is controlled by a-rotary damper 87. The damper 87 is rotatably connected with a plate inwhich are formed the openings 86, and carries a frame 88 which extends through the front wall 'of the cabinet and carries a handle 89 on theoutside. cabinet wall opening is formed with an expansion' space above the bearing of frame 88. The function'of the hot blast attachment will more fully hereinafter appear.

I now call attention to the vapor tank which is carried by the rear casing plate 44, and which lies in the space between the, said casing plate and the drum 24. (Figures 4, 6 and 7.) The vapor tank is indicated at 1 90, and is inserted through an opening in casing plate 44. ,The face of the tank car- This ries suitable handle, and a will benoted that the face of the tank is both longer and wider than the opening in the plate. An suitable meansmay berprovided for hol ing the vapor tank in position. For instance, I have providedthe top and bottom of the face with slots 91, which engage lugs- 92 formed on-the wall 44.

I now call particular attention to the 'louveropenings 93, which are formed in the than any other type-of air intake-opening,

because when the louver type of opening is employed, the incoming cold air is forced to travel directly into engagement with the fire pot. The air impinging against the fire pot is heated to a very high temperature almost instantly, and rises in the space between the. casing and the drum. The louver type of opening is also desirable because when this tyipe of opening is employed the fire pot is e ectively concealed from view. Large quantities of air are circulated through the casin during heating action, and as is obvious rom the' drawing, the inlet opening 93 is made of liberal proportions,- so that despite the rapidity with which the air moves throu h the'passage as itis progressively heate V therein, the setting up of rapidly flowing currents in the room by the cold airas it passes to thelouvers is prevented, and a comparatively large quantity of air flows to the heater at a. rather low velocity. Rapidly flowing currents of air along the floor would tend to entrain dust. and the like and to carry it into the heater, and as the current of heated air coming out of the top of the heater travels at a considerable velocity in its flow upward such circulation type convection heater as distinguished from one having discharge openings all along the passage and walls where the air obtains its heat. I

A portion of the air which rises. in the space between the casing and the drum pmes directly upward and out through the slots in the dome 42. A portion. of the rising air passes through the Y-shaped passage afforded bv conduits 40 where it is superheated, and then directed into the dome and thence outwardly throu h the slots in the latter. When the hot b ast damper '87 is open, a portion of the preheated air in the space between the casing and drum is taken into the U-sl1aped passage 85 and passes downwardly into casting 83 and out of tuyres 84. ,The air directed into the fire pot through the tuyeres is superheated to a very high temperature in passing through passage 85 and casting 83, and when discharged into the fire pot produces thorough combustion of the unburnt gases rising from j the fuel bed and consumes. the soot, and

' tends to prevent accumulation of dead ashes at the outer edge of the fire.

The va or tank insures that the air dis charged t rough the dome openings will be properly humid, and likewise keeps a. considerable quantity of hot water available 1 whenever the heater is in operation.

The modified embodiment of my invention illustrated in Fi 12 is used in connection with a hot air pipe 94 which extends from the heater to a hot air register 95 located at some point remote from the'heater, as, for instance, in a room above that in which the heater 'is located. The lower end of the hot air pipe fits into the opening in the-heater dome from which the grid 55 is removed.

: When this embodiment of my invention is major emplo ed, the room in which the heater is locate is heated bya portion of the warmv air which rises in the space between the easing and the heater drum and scapes through the apertures in the dome. A portion ofthe heated air which rises in the space between opening channel; a combustion chamber havinga fire-pot supported on the ash-box; a casing having its lower edge loosely, seated in said channel and laterally enclosing and (ill spaced from the combustion chamber and tire-pot, the casing being formed with air inlet openings surrounding and directly opposite the fire-pot; and a dome'sccured to and spaced above the top of the combustion chamber and slidably contacting with the surface of-the casing, the dome being en-' circled with air escape openings.

.2. In a portable heater ada ted to be placed in a living room, the com ination of a-base formed with a peripheral shoulder; an ash-box formed with a peripheral flange rcmovably seated on the shoulder, the'flan being provided with a peripheral upward y volume of air through the heater, said opening channel; a combustion chamber having a fire-pot supported on the ash-box; a casing havin its lower edge loosely seated in said channe and laterally enclosing and 3. In a portable heater adapted to'be placed in-a living room, the combination of a. base formed with a peripheral shoulder; an ash-box formed witha peripheral flange removably seated on the shoulder; the flange being provided with a peripheral upward y opening channel; a combustion chamber having a fire-pot supported on the ash-box; a

casing having its lower edge loosely seated in said channel and laterally enclosing and spaced from the combustion chamber and lire-pot, the casing being formed with air inlet louver openings surronnding and directly opposite the 'fire -pot', the space be-' tween the casing and the|combustion cham her and fire-pot being entirely closed at the bottom by theash-box; and a dome secured toand spaced above the .top of the combustion chamber and slidably contacting with the surface of the casing, the dome being encircled with air escape openings.

y 4. A portable circulation type convection heater adapted to bet placed in a livin room and to heat the air therein primarily y convection, comprising a combustion chamber having a .fire-pot section at the lower part thereof and a drum section surmounting the fire- 0t, and an outer casing enclosing said com ustion chamber, said casing being of substantially rectangular cross-sectional outline substantially throughout its height and spaced from the combustion "chamber in energy radiating i and absorbing relationship therewith to rovide an air passage of liberal proportions or the tree circulation of a large assa'ge having an air inlet opening thereinto adjacent the lower end of said passage to admit the air to be heated into contact with the heated walls of said passa e and an outlet for the discharge of said eated air adjacent the upper end of each passa c, said passage and inlet opening being 0 liberal proportions to permit the free flow of air "therethrough, and said casing being imperforate in its extent intermediate the saidinlet and discharge openings 5. A portable heater adapted to be laced in a living room and to heat the air t erein primarily by convection, comprising a corn ustion chamber'having a fire pot section at the lower part thereof and a combustion sectionsurmounting the fire-pot, and a casmg enclosing said combustion chamber and spaced therefrom, said casing embodying four substantially flat'rectangular sides 1nterconnected attheir side edges to provide a casing of substantially rectangularcrosssection throughout its height and spaced from the combustion chamber in energy ra-.

dieting and absorbing relationship therewith toprovide an air passage of liberal proportions for the free circulation of a large volume of air through the heater, said casing having a discharge opening of liberal size adjacent the lower end of said passage permitting fi-ee discharge of the heated air from the heater, said sides havingv a series of spaced openings at their lower portions ad- 'acent the fire-pot section providing an air Inlet opening of liberal size permitting free inflow of large quantities of air to be'heated into said air passage, and being imperforate )etween the said inlet and discharge openings.

6. A portable circulation type convection heater adapted to be placed in a livi room and to heat the air therein rimarily y con- .vection, comprising a com ustion chamber having a fire-potsection at the lower part thereof and a combustion section surmounting the fire-pot, and a casing having imperforate upper and central wall portions enclosin said combustion chamber and spaced theref om, said casingbeing of substantially rectan lar cross-sectional outline substantially. t roughout its height and spaced from the combustion chamber in energy radiating and absorbing relationship therewith to provide an enclosed air passage of liberal proportions for the free circulation of a arge volume of air through the heater, and

liberally proportioned means for admitting a large amount of cold air to be heated through contact with the walls of the combustion chamber and the easing into the pas sage between the combustion chamber and the casing adjacent a point in said passage above which the passage is atall points. of

lar e cross-sectional area providing for free an unrestricted flow of air;

7 A portable circulation type convection heater adapted to be placed in a living room and to heat the air thereinprimarily by corivection, comprising a combustion chamber having a fire-pot section at the lower part thereof and a cylindrical side wall section surmounting the fire-pot, and an outercasing enclosing said combustion chamber, said casing being of substantially rectangular cross-sectional outline substantially through- V out its height and spaced from the combuslower end thereof to admit the air to be heated without materially restrict-ing the flow of air through the heater, into contact .With the heated walls of said passage, and

a discharge opening adjacent the upper end of said passage providing for free flow of heated air from said passage, said casing being imperforate throughout its extent intermediate the said inlet and discharge openings, and a superheating conduit connected tothe said passage in heat transferring relationship Wltllr the combustion chamber, to

increase the effective movement of the heated air through said air passage.

8. A portable heater adapted to be laced in a living room and to heat the air t erein primarily by convection, comprising a comustion chamber having a, fire-pot sectionat the lower part thereof and a combustion section surmounting the fire-pot, an ash box section supporting said fire-pot section, a base on which said ash box section is mounted,

and a casing enclosing said combustion section and fire-pot section and spaced therefrom, said casing embodyin four coin aratively flat rectangular si es imper orate throughout their upper and major extent and interconnected at their side edges to 'provide a casing of substantially rectanguar cross-section throu hout its height and spaced from the com ustion chamber in energy radiating and absorbing relation-v ship therewith to provide an air passage of liberal proportions for the free circulation of a large volume of air through the heater, said four sides extending down substantially to said base so that said sides and ash box section are supported upon the base substantially at a common joint, said sides having a series of horizontally arranged openings adjacent the fire box section to provide an air inlet 0 enin thefree ow t erethrough of air to be heated.

9. A portable heater adapted to-be laced in a living roomand to heat the air t erein primarily by convection, comprising a comustion chamber" having a fire-pot section at of liberal area topermit.

the lower part thereof and a combustion section surmounting the fire-pot, an ash box section below said fire-pot section, a casing enclosin said sections and s aced therefrom, said casing embodying our substam tially flat rectangular sides interconnected at their side edges to provide a casing of substantiall rectangular cross-section throughout its eight and spaced" from the combustion chamber in energy radiating and absorbing relationship therewith to provide an air passage of liberal proportions for the free circulation of a large volume of air through the heater, means for sup orting said casing and said sections, said sid es having a series of vertically spaced horizontal louvers therein adjacent the fire box section to provide an air inlet opening of'liberal area, said air passage having a discharge opening connected thereto for the esca' of.

the heated air, said sides being imper orate throughout their extent between the said louvers and the said discharge openin 10. A circulation type convection heater adapted to be placed in a living room and to heat the air therein primarily by convection, com rising a combustion chamber having a re-pot section at the lower part thereof and a combustion section surmounting the fire-pot, and a casing enclosing said combustion chamber and spaced therefrom, said casing embodying four substantially fiat rectangular sides interconnected at their side edges to provide a casing of substantially iactangular cross-section throughout adjacent the fire-v 0t section providing an air inlet opening of arge total size offering no substantial restrictio'n'to the flow of air to the heater. a

In witness whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this 23rd day of May. 1925.

' BERTRAND B. KAHN.

Referenced by
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