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Publication numberUSRE17994 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1931
Filing dateSep 17, 1925
Publication numberUS RE17994 E, US RE17994E, US-E-RE17994, USRE17994 E, USRE17994E
InventorsBbjf Estbl Kkomb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Asshhtob
US RE17994 E
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 10, 1931.

E. E. EMONS" SPECTACLES Original Filed Sept. 17, 1925 INVENTOR.

l'rnesiEEmons ATTORNEY.

be resorted to which come within the scope Reieeued Mar. 10, 1931 umrao srArasf PATENT ol-rlca mm I. IIOII, OI m, OHIO, WHO], 3! DIRECT AND 1mm: AS816 '.l'0 m JUL-WE ILL column, WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

sacrum firl laal Io. 1,685,198, dated leptember 85, um, leriel Ila. 58,957, fled September 17, 182i. Renewed Ian]: 8, 1937. Application-for reissue filed larch 4, 1800. Serial 10. 488,154.

This invention relates to spectacles and I has for its object to provide an article of such class, in a manner as hereinafter set forth, with means for not only reducing the ohstructed field of vision to a minimum, but also to prevent the nose bridge of the spectacles from riding downwardly on the nose to maintain the lenses in the position to which they have been. initially set.

I. In spectacles now in general use, the temporal attachment is connected 180' meridian of the lenses and these latter at ri ht angles with respect to the attachment; 0 positions of the attachment and lenses relative to each other not only have been an obstrucs tion to lateral vision, but further the nose brid e would shift downwardly on the nose to c ange the (positions of the lenses after initially set, an to overcome such ObJGCtlOHS is the primary objectof the invention, and

' to this end the invention consists in the elevoting, of the point of connection of the attachment with the lens frame or lenses, so

that the temporal attachment'is removed from a direct useful field of vision, thereby permitting ofa clear and unobstructed view of objects, which when otherwise obstructed, have a direct tendency to endanger human lives, and the invention furtherconsists in positioning the lens frame or lenses .at an obtuse angle with respect to the forward ends of the tem oral attachment, whereby the lens frame or enses will act to prevent the nose bridge from riding downwardly on the nose,

under such conditions maintaining the lenses parts,"as hereinafter more speci cally described and illustrated in the accompanying.

drawings, wherein is shown an embodiment of the invention, but it isyto be understood that changes, variations and modifications can of the claims hereunto appended.

In the Y drawings wherein like refer- .ence characters denote corresponding parts throughout the several views disposedon said temple side,- at a point obcenters of the pupils of the eyes when the in the position to which they have been in- Figure 1 is a front elevation of a pair of spectacles, in acoordancewith this invention.

Figure 2 is a top plan view thereof.

Figure 3 is a side elevation. I

Figure 4 is a front elevation ofa modified 5r fOIiPm.

igure 5 isa fragmentar view in ers tive, looking towards the outersidd of t e h nged and bevelled joint between an end piece and a temple bar and illustrating also in dotted lines the coactin bevelled'surfaces and in full lines the ang es formed by the... bevels.

Figure 6 a front elevation of a further modi ed form.

Referrin to Figures 1 to 3 of the drawings, the front 0 the spectacles consists of a heavy shell frame 1 formed of zylonite, fiberloid or other suitable material capable of resiliency and stretching under the application of heat.

The frame 1 includes a nose bri 2 and a a pair of lens receiving rims'3. e nose bridge 2 is arranged between the op osed inner-sides'of and'connects the pair ofrims. 3together. A lens 4 is mounted in each of the I'HIIS 3. I

The outer'side of each rim is termed the temple side and integral with such temple side is a protuberance 5 which has its inner end lique to the center of the horizontal meridian of the lens 4. The protuberances 5 on the temple sides of the rims are located above the spectacles are in place on the face. As illustrated, by way of example,- each protuber- I ance 'isarranged at the upper part of the temple side of the rim and disposed substantially tangentially with-respect to the latter. The rotuberances 5 arelocated out of the usefu field of vision and are termed end pieces, end piececonnections or oints of attachment for'the temple bars to epresently referred to and act as a means to maintain the temple bars out ofthe useful field of vision when the spectacles are worn. The angles included between the end piece connections and the plane of the lenses are acute. That part of the temple side of each rim from the protuberance tothe bottom of such side it. 5 by the hold-fast devices 14 and to the temple is formed in a mannerto prevent the impairing of the vision from the temple side of each rim from the protuberance to the bottom of such side is formed in a manner to prevent the impairing of the visionfr om the temple sides of-the spectacles. The: outer end of each end piece 5 is bevelled as at 6,

and is adapted to abut againstthe bevelled end surface 7 of the temple bar 8. The

temple bars 8 are connected to'the end pieces 5 by hinges 9. The axes of the hinges9 are inclined with respect to the-plane of the lenses. The bevelled end surfaces 6 and 7 extend throughout rearwardly at an inclination from the top thereof. The bevelled surfaces 6 are adapted to abut the bevelled surfaces 7. when the spectacles are worn whereby the frame 1 will be disposed at an acute angle'with respect to the forward ends of the bars 8, as clearly shown in FigureB, and this inanner of p0sitioning the frame 1 with respect to the bars 8 will prevent the nose bridge from riding downwardly 0n the nose so that the initial 'Each of-the templeb'a'r's 8 comprises an upper portion 10, a-dep'ending rearwardly. extending intermediate portion 11,. and a downwardly inclined rear portion 12. The

position of the lenses with respect to the eyes will be maintained.

upper portion 10 is of greater length than "either of the portions 11 and 12 and is. slightly curved in the direction of its len 'th'so that it will extend, intermediate its ends, towards the head ofzthe wearer.

It will be stated, however, that the temple bar can be set up of any suitable contour.

" The frame is applicable to receiveany size "'or'shape of lenses, as the-material of the- 1 frame can be readily stretched to receive the lenses-4:. The act of stretching will in no manner distort or move out of alignment the end pieces 5. It willbe noted that the end pieces 5 are always symmetrical as they are I based on straight lines instead of circles.

' The bevel faces on the opposedends of an The hinges 9 are secured .to the end pieces bars 8 by the hold-fast devices 15.

Referring to Figure 5, the angles formed by the bevel on the end piece 5 are shown in full lines and designated A, B. The angles formed by the bevel on the temple bar 8 are shown in full lines and designated C, D.

end piece andtemple bar are indicated-in dotted lines and designated E. The bevel on the temple bar is indicated in; dotted lines and designated E. The bevel on the temple bar 8 extends rearwardly at an inclination from the top thereof and the-bevel on the end-piece projects outwardly at an inclination from the-- top thereof. The bevelsalso extend trans versely of the end piece and temple bar. In

Figure 5,1t-he upper face of the end piece is indicated at H and thefront side face at I. The upper face of the temple bar is designated J and the outer side face thereof at K. The hinge connection is designated 9.

Referring to Figure 4, the front of the spectacles is formed from a frame constructed of light shell material and which includes a pair of rims 16, 17, connected together by a nose piece 18. Secured to each of the rims, at the top thereof, is a laterally extending tangentially disposed end piece comprising an inner clamping portion 19 and an outwardly extending short protuberance 20 disposed tangentially with respect to the rim. .The end piece ,or point of attachment, shown 1nFigL 1re 4, and which is referred to generally by the reference character 21, is

symmetrical and based on straight lines instead of circles. Pivotally connected, as at 22, to the outer end of the arm 20, is a temple bar 23, and the point of connection between the arms 20 and bars 23 is such as to maintain the lenses at an acute angle with respect to the temple bars. Each rim canbe stretched for any requirement, to conform to the shape of the lens 24.

Referring to Figure 6 of the drawings, it illustrates a. pair of rimless spectacles complete, and the lenses thereof are indicated at '25, and each of which is shown, by way of example, as of polygonal contour. The lenses 25 are coupled together by a nose bridge 26. Connected to each lens 25, at the top thereof, aswell as extending laterally there- ;from is a tangentially disposed end piece or point of attachment 27. Holdfast devices 28 are employedfor securing the inner end of the end piece 27 to the lens 25, and" the outer end ofthe end piece 27 is pivotally connected, as at 29, to a temple bar 3(l'and the connections between the end pieces 7 and temple bars 30 are such as to provide for the lenses to be disposed at an obtuse angle with respect,

to the forward end .of the temple bars 30. Bearing strips 31 are interposed between the end pieces 27 and the edges of the lenses 25, and bearing strips 32 are interposed between the nose bridge and. the lenses 25. The bridge 26is secured to the lenses 25 by the holdfast devices 33,.

It will appear by reference to Figures 4 and 6 that the end pieces 21, 27 each include a horizontal part anda part divergent from the latter. The divergent part is for connection in fixed relation with respect to the lens the temple is for pivotal connection to the horizontal part.

The inner end of each protuberance, end piece or point of attachment, of thevarious forms shown, is disposed at a meridian at an oblique angle to the horizontal with respect toja lens, that is to say the protuberance or -end piece or point of attachment of the/tempic is locatedabove the center of the pupil of the eye when the spectacle is in place before the eye. This arrangement permanently maintains the lenses in a predetermined fixed position, as well as prevents any tilting thereof and further acts to arrest the moving foryvard of lenses with less tensionon .ed by the use of an end piece or point of attachment, in accordance with this invention.

The end piece or point of attachment permits of greater range of adjustments, due to the fact that the temple is on a horizontal plane with the brow and top of the car as the dimension of the head is more uniform at the position of the end piece or point of attachment than where the temple runs over the cheek bones as is usually the case in the form of spectacles now used. The end piece or point of attachment, in accordance with this invention will in addition permit of a greater number of people being fitted and benefitted by glasses who heretofore, due to irregular facial contour, could not be supplied. Furthermore, the position of the end piece or point of attachment with respect to the lenses elevates the temporal attachment above the" position now generally employed, which is at the 180th meridian of the lenses, and by elevating the end piece or point of attachment, it is removed from a direct useful field of vision, thereby permitting of a clear, unobstructed view of objects. The setting up of the spectacles with the end piece or point of attachment, in accordance with this inven-- tion, necessitates no noticeable increase in the cost of manufacture, thereby not limiting its usages or advantagesto any one, at the same time it possesses more attractive and useful advantages.

As hereinbefore stated,'the positioning of the frame or the lenses at an acute angle with respect to the temple bars prevents the nose bridge from riding downwardly on the nose,

under such conditions maintaining the lenses in the position in which they have been in- .itiall y set to obtain proper vision at all times,

It is to be understood that in referring to the horizontal meridian or median line or the horizontal center of a lens, I am referring to the pupilary center thereof, that is, that point of a lens, regardless of the peripheral configuration of the lens, that is on a straight line with the center of the pupil" of the eye of the wearer when the eye is directed forwardly on a straight line and when the spectacle carryingthe lenses are in proper position before the eyes of the wearer. This is intended to distinguish clearly from What otherwise might be referred to as the geometrical center of a lens; the geometrical center being unimportant in the matter of determining the proper position of the lenses of a pair of spectacles before the eyes of the wearer. y s a It is thought the many advantages derived from a pair of spectacles, constructed in. accordance with this invention, can be readily understood, and-although the preferred embodiments of the invention are as illustrated and described, yet it is to be understood that changes in; the details of construction can be had which will fall within the scopeof the invention as claimed. i

What Iclaim is v 1. In apair of spectacles, a front,.a-;pair of end pieces carriedby and projecting therefrom at each end thereof, and a pair of-temple bars hinged to said end pieces,-the axcsolf the hinges between the bars and end piecesibeing inclined with respect to the plane of the front, said bars and end pieces having like bevelled surfaces and with the bevel of each surface extending throughout rearwardly at an inclination from its top, the bevelled surfaces of the end Pieces adapted to abut the bevelled surfaces 0 said bars and in connection with the. axes of the hinges disposing the front at an acute angle with respect to the bars when these latter extend rearwardly at right angles with respect to the front to prevent the latter from riding downwardly on the nosewhen set thereon. r i I 2. In a pair of spectacles, a front, a pair of end pieces projecting tangentially in opposite directions therefrom, each of said end pieces having its lnner end merging into the top and of a length to p'roject'an appropriate distance from an end of-said front, anda pair of templev bars hinged to said end pieces and positioned bythese latter at points removed from a direct useful field of vision, the axes of the hinges-between the bars andend pieces being inclined with respect to the plane of the front, said bars and end pieces having like bevelled surfaces and with the bevel of each surface extending throughout rearwardly at an inclination. the bevelled surfaces of the end pieces adapted to abut the bevelled surfaces of said bars andin connection with the axesof the hinges disposing the frontat anacute angle with respect to the bars when these latter extend rearwardly at right angles with respect to the front to prevent the latter from riding down when set upon a wearers head.

3. Ina pair of spectacles, a bridge piece for connecting the, lenses together, temple bars,-

said end pieces locatedcompletely out of the useful field of vision, and hinged means between the outermost ends of said end pieces and forward ends of the temple bars to maintain said fixed position of the lenses with respect to the tern le bars, the axes of the hinge means being inc ined with respect to the plane of the lenses.

| 4. In a pair of s ctacles, oppositely extending lateral 'en pieces dlsposed at a meridian oblique to the horizontal meridian with respect to the lenses to permanently fix the position of said lenses, said end pieces being located completely out of the useful I. a field of VlSlOIl and extending in the plane of the lenses, and stationary hm ed means for connecting the outermost en s of said end pieces to the forward ends of temple bars and aving the axes thereof inclined with respect to the plane of the lenses.

'5. A spectacle frame, comprising temple lugs the rear faces of which occupy a plane which is inclined from the rear toward the a front face of the lens holding? frame, temple bars, and hinges, one wing 0 each of which is connected to the front end of the temple bar and the other wing of which is connected to the said rear faces upon the said temple j 6. In a pair of spectacles or the like, abridge piece for connectin the lenses together, tom le bars, opposite y extending end ieces is d at a meridian oblique to the a orizonta meridian with respect to the lenses to permanently fix the position of said lenses, said end pieces providing a pair of supporting points, said end lpieces located above and out of the useful fie d of vision, and hinged a means between the ends of said end pieces and a forward ends of the temple .bars to maintain said fixed position of the lenses withres'pect to the temple bars, [the axes of the hinge means being inclined with respect to the plane a) of the lenses.

7. In a pair of spectacles or the like, oppositely extending end pieces disposed. at. a meridian oblique to the horizontal meridian with respect to the lenses to permanently fix v45 the position of. said lenses, said end pieces being located above'andout .of the useful fieldof vision, and stationary hinged means for connecting-the ends of said end pieces to the forward ends of the temple bars andhaving'th'e axes thereof inclined with respect to the plane of the lenses. v 1 I 1 8. In a pair of spectacles,-a pair of lenses, I I

" means connecting the lenses, :1 pair of temple end pieces, each including a horizontal as part and a part divergent from the'horizon- ;.'tal p art, meansifor connecting the divergent "parts in'fixed related position with'respect -to the lenses above vthe centers of'the pupils v of the e es when the spectacles are in place 06- before t e eyes, a pair of temples, and means for pivotal-1y connecting the temples to the horizontal parts. v

a In testimony whereof, I afiix my signature hereto- 1 ERNEST E. EMONS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5387949 *Jan 29, 1992Feb 7, 1995Oakley, Inc.Eyeglass connection device
US8613515Nov 8, 2011Dec 24, 2013Tifosi Optics Inc.Lens receptor lock for glasses