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Publication numberUSRE19898 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1936
Publication numberUS RE19898 E, US RE19898E, US-E-RE19898, USRE19898 E, USRE19898E
InventorsJoseph Fonsek
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Preservation of eggs
US RE19898 E
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Reissued Mar. 24, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PROCESS FOR THE STERILIZATION AND PRESERVATION OF EGGS Joseph Fousek, San Francisco, Calif., assignor to givolo Incorporated, a corporation of Califor- No Drawing. Original no. 1,852,606, dated April 5, 1932, Serial No. 278,037, May is, 1928. Application for reissue February 16, 1934, Serial No.

' mixture of whites and yolks, the product secured from thus processing eggsbeing of a character specification the term egg" applies generically to any and all eggs, but more particularly to those of the domestic fowl, and that it is also intended to apply to the whole egg as removed from the shell, or to thewhites, or to the yolks,

or to the whites and yolks combined in any'desired proportions.-

The present process for the sterilization and preservation of eggs has been developed since the issuance of my Patent No. 1,597,186, of August the 26th, 1926, and results from the experience gained in connection therewith, coupled with the research work 'connected with my applications for patents, Serial No. 190,654, filed May the 11th, 1927, and Patent No. 1,724,078.

It was learned from the experiments conducted in connection with the above noted processes for egg preservation that, with a properly proportioned mixture of egg, sugar and syrup, reduced to complete emulsification and subjected to a right temperature, the product thus produced became possessed of excellent keeping qualities. Additional research also disclosed that the addition of the saccharine matter coupled with the emulsiflcation process acted directly for the immediate 'separation'from the egg body of all membranous, protoplasmic and like constituents entering into the egg structure and that the removal of these gave a greatly improved product as to quality, together with a much extended period of preservation to this refined product when unsealed. Further investigation also developed that certain others of the carbohydrate group possessed the property of effecting this separation, as did also certain of the polyhydric alcohols, such as mannitol, glycerin and glycol, and.

pairment as to quality, whether as a whole. as

1': Claims. (Cl. 99-151) whites, as yolks, or as whites and yolks in any desired proportionate quantities.

Objects additional to the foregoing are:

To so process and preserve eggs in bulk as to fit them for substitution for fresh eggs, in the 5 culinary arts and elsewhere, where excellency of results are required and are so greatly dependent upon the quality of the eggs used;

To so process and preserve eggs in bulk as to cause them to retain in full measure those essential physical and chemical characteristics found in the fresh egg, and to prevent that denaturalization of proteins and degeneration of the egg substance commonly known as watering of the whites; a 1

To so process eggs for their preservation as to destroy all bacteria without affecting the character of the physical and chemical constituents of the eggs;

To cheaply sterilize and preserve eggs without impairment, as a contributing means to the prevention of that waste in the egg industry resulting from the perishable character of eggs;

To so sterilize, preserve and seal eggs in acontainer as to insure keeping indefinitely and unimtioned and standardized for immediate use and of a quality insuring uniformity of results in the arts utilizing eggs in their products;

To provide a sterilized preserved egg product adapted to meet the different requirements of the diverse arts employing eggs in their products, by

varying the proportions of water, albumen, yolk, and a selected carbohydrate, or its equivalent of polyhydric alcohol, entering into the completed product;

To provide a cheapened labor-saving sterilized 40.

preserved egg product freed from all membranous and protoplasmic particles, and of a character readily assimilable by all doughs and particularly valuable in the production of the finer and more delicate bakery products, such as ladyfingers, sponges, etc. and, finally;

To supply to the general trade, and to others, a processed egg product of superior quality and clear honey-like consistency, from which, at an earlier stage, has been removed all those elements of inferior food values and most subject to de-' terioration, leaving, as a refined product, those art of baking, after breaking and mixing the ess being of a disintegrating character causing the separation of the membranous and protoplasmic portions from the egg-body, proper, the

former, being the lighter, rising to the top, from whence it was removed and rejected as worthless. In my process, this step is not delayed but is of, practically, immediate accomplishment. Nor is there need of any sacrifice of removed elements as waste, since these, too, are sterilized and hermetically sealed for later use in the making of macaroons and such like delicacies.

The invention resides in the incorporation with the egg content of a variable amount of a suitable carbohydrate, or its equivalent of a polyhydric alcohol, such as glucose, fructose, saccharose or mannitol, glycerin, or glycol, these acting to separate the membranous-and protoplasmic portions of the egg from its watery, albuminous and protein portions,"while, at the same time, raising the coagulating temperature of the egg albumen from a matter of 140 degrees Fahrenheit, at which the ordinary bacteria would be immune, to an approximate 170 degrees Fahrenheit, a temperature insuring the destruction of the bacteria and perfect sterilization of the product when subjected to it, without impairment of the quality of the product through partial or com- A plete coagulation of the albumen.

The proportion of carbohydrate, or of its equivalent 'of a polyhydric alcohol, used may vary considerably, but most essentially must be confined within the limits affecting markedly the physical structure of the egg liquid and the heat protective action upon the colloid present in the whites and yolks of the eggs, these proportions varying safely, by weight, from 1:1, 3:2 or 2:3, any of these ratios meeting successfully the requirements of the process.

My process for the sterilization and preservation of eggs is substantially as follows:

1. The eggs, after removal from their shells, are weighed and placed in a mechanical mixer;

2. To the eggs are now added the required proportion of a suitable carbohydrate, or its equivalent of polyhydric alcohol;

3. The composition thus secured is thoroughly mixed to a state of perfect emulsification;

4. After emulsification, the mass, now of syrupy-like consistency, is allowed to stand for a short time to permit loosening and separation of the membranous and protoplasmic portions from the watery, albuminous and protein portions;

5. Following this, comes the removal of the membranous and protoplasmic portions, by skimming, straining or centrifugal separator action;

6. The two products thus secured are now separately subjected to a germ-destroying heat for a time and immediately thereafter hermetically sealed in containers.

While the main purpose sought is the production of a refined preserved sterilized egg product, it is obvious that three distinct products may result from the process, the first containing the entire egg, the second only the refuse or membranous, and protoplasmic portions, and the third the refined albuminous and protein portions.

It is realized that others have used either sugar or glycerin in connection with egg preservation,

ciently low to aifect the physical properties of l the protein; and, if the latter, the glycerin acting to protect against deterioration of the physical and chemical properties through a too drastic dehydration.

I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, the following:

1. The herein described process of preserving eggs which comprises introducing into a broken egg mass a carbohydrate for the purpose of causing the separation of the membranous, protoplasmic and fibrous portions of the egg structure from the remaining portions thereof, emulsifying the egg and carbohydrate mixture, allowing said mixture to settle, and thereafter separating the fibrous portions therefrom.

2. The herein described process of preserving broken eggs which comprises adding a carbohydrate thereto in sufiicient quantity to loosen the membranous, protoplasmic and fibrous structure of the egg, mixing and emulsifying thoroughly, allowing the admixture to settle, then skimming said loosened membranous, protoplasmic and fibrous structure from the remaining portions of the egg and finally straining-said remaining egg liquid to clarify the same.

3. The herein described method of preserving egg contents which comprises mixing a selected from 3:2 to 2:3, by weight, thoroughly emulsifying the mixture, allowing said mixture to settle,

and then straining it.

'4. The process of substantially sterilizing and preserving egg contents which comprises adding to the egg contents an amount of a carbohydrate sufficient to raise the temperature of coagulation thereof upon application of heat, emulsifying the resulting product, permitting the emulsifiedmass to stand until the membranous and protoplasmic portion is separated out, removing said membranous and protoplasmic portion, and heating the remaining portion to destroy the contained germs.

5. The process of preserving egg contents which comprises adding thereto an amount of carbohydrate sufiicient to raise the temperature of coagulation thereof when heat is applied, emulsifying the resulting product. permitting the emulsified mass to stand until the membranous and protoplasmic portion is separated out, and heating the membranous and protoplasmic portion to destroy the contained germs.

6. The herein described process of preserving eggs which comprises forming an emulsion of egg contents with glycerin, causing the admixture to settle and separating fibrous material therefrom.

7. The herein described process of preserving mass containing awater-soluble,edible,polyhydric preservative of the class consisting of carbohydrates, glycol, glycerin and mannitol and substantially devoid of fibrous material to an extent not procurable by the customary ripening treatment, whereby the keeping properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture of products baked therewith materially improved.

, 9. A heat-treated homogeneous egg mass containing at least 40% by weight of a water-soluble, edible, polyhydric preservative of the class consisting of carbohydrates, glycol, glycerin and mannitol and substantially devoid of fibrous material to an extent not procurable by the customary ripening treatment, whereby the keeping properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture of products baked therewith'materially improved.

10. Anlintimate mixture of egg contents and carbohydrate which is substantially devoid of fibrous material and coagulation products to an extent not procurahle by the customary ripening treatment whereby the keeping properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture oi products baked therewith materially improved and with substantially inhibited bacteria action.

11. A substantially preserved intimate mixture of egg contents and sugar which is substantially devoid of fibrous material to an extent not procurable by the customary ripening treatment, whereby the keeping properties of said as! mass are materially enhanced. and-the texture oi products baked therewith materially improved.

12. An homogeneous egg mass containing from about 40% to 60% by weight of sugar and substantially devoid of fibrous material and active germs to an extent not procurabie by the customary ripening treatment whereby the keeping properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture of products baked therewith materially improved.

13. Arr homogeneous liquid egg mass containing gLycerin and substantially devoid of fibrous material to an extent not proeurable by the customary ripening treatment, whereby the keep-' ing properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture of products baked therewith materially improved.

14. An homogeneous, heat-treated liquid egg mass substantially devoid of fibrous material to an.extent not procurable by the customary ripe! ing treatment, whereby the keeping properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture of products baked therewith materially improved and containing at least 40% sugar.

15. The herein described process of preserving eggs which comprises forming an emulsion of egg contents with an edible, water-soluble preservative oi the class consisting of carbohydrate. mannitol. glycerine and glycol, causing the admixture to settle and separating fibrous materials thereirom.

l6. Preserved clear liquid egg mass comprising a preserving quantity of sugar and of honeylike consistency, said product having been heattreated to obtain a substantially inhibited microorganism action and whose normal fibrous con-' tent hasbeen substantially removed to an extent not procurabie by the customary ripening treatment whereby the keeping properties of said egg mass are materially enhanced and the texture oi products baked therewith materially improved.

17. The hereindescribed. process of preserving eggs which comprises forming an emulsion of egg contents with sugar, allowing the mass to stand for a time sumcient to loosen and separate fibrous material (mm the mass vproper; subjecting the emulsion to centrifugal force, whereby the fibrous material is substantially completely removed and subjecting the centrifuged mass to a heat treatment above 140' I. but below that temperature at which substantial co ulation oi albumen would take place.

J FOUSEK,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2565311 *Jun 2, 1948Aug 21, 1951Swift & CoEgg pasteurization
US6814999Dec 17, 2002Nov 9, 2004Michael Foods, Inc.Heating in microwave ovens; mixture of eggs, leavening, nonfat milk solids, starch, gums and emulsifiers
US7241469May 30, 2002Jul 10, 2007Michael Foods, Inc.Formulation and process to prepare a pre-formed filing unit
US7288279Jun 6, 2002Oct 30, 2007Michael Foods Of Delaware, Inc.Liquid egg white is preheated and deposited within mold for slow cooking under controlled conditions, liquid yolk is preheated and added to mold for placement on egg white, mold containing formulated egg is cooked, frozen, packaged
US7338681Jun 10, 2005Mar 4, 2008Michael Foods Of Delaware, Inc.Egg white portion containing salt and oil is preheated and deposited within a mold for slow cooking under controlled conditions; yolk portion is preheated and added to the mold on top of the egg white; may be frozen for future heating within a microwave or other oven
US7709039Jan 8, 2008May 4, 2010Michael Foods Of Delaware, Inc.Formulated fried egg
US7951411Sep 26, 2007May 31, 2011Michael Foods Of Delaware, Inc.Producing molded frozen product with texture and sensory perceptions of naturally fried eggs; quick microwave and/or oven preparation foods
US8211488Apr 19, 2010Jul 3, 2012Michael Foods Of Delaware, Inc.Process to prepare a premium formulated fried egg
US8834952Jun 29, 2012Sep 16, 2014Michael Foods, Inc.Formulated egg product suitable for processing
USRE43136 *Oct 31, 2007Jan 24, 2012Michael Foods Of Delaware, Inc.Formulation and process to prepare a pre-formed filing unit