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Publication numberUSRE21110 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1939
Filing dateApr 7, 1933
Publication numberUS RE21110 E, US RE21110E, US-E-RE21110, USRE21110 E, USRE21110E
InventorsClyde Sinitfiy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Addressing and printing machine
US RE21110 E
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1939. C T Re. 21,110

ADDRESSING AND PRINTENG MACHiNE Original Filed April '7, 1953 7 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR (9m Sniff/u,

BY dlf g Wu ATTORN EY June 6, 1939. I c sMlTH Re. 21,110

ADDRESSING AND PRINTING MACHINE Original Filed April '7, 1933 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 c SMITH Re. 21,110

ADDRESSING AND PRINTING MACHINE Or1g1nal Flled Aprll 7, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet I5 INVENTOR I 496a? Slut/V, BY dim. MW

ATTORNEYS June 6, 1939.

June 6, 1939. (3. SMITH Re. 21,110

ADDRESSING AND PRINTING MACHINE Original Filed April 7, 1933 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 I VENTOR @2 57711111 gnawml.

ATTORNEY June 6, 1939. c. SMITH ADDRESSING AND PRINTING MACHINE Original Filed April 7, 1933 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR dam Qua-L ATTORN EYJ' June 6, 1939.

7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Original Filed April 7, 1953 @Ni EQ ha a 5 l NVENTOR (Z yde Snath/ ATTORNEY;

June 6, 1939. c. SMITH Re. 21,110

ADDRESSING AND PRINTING mommy: I

Original Filed April 7, 19:55 7 sheets-sheet 7 ABCDEFGH IJKLHNOPQRSTUVWXYZJ. I 8"OIZ3H56789 mvEN-rqR flwng Maw.

ATTORNEY? Reissued June 6, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AnmmssING AND PRINTING MACHINE tion of Delaware Original No. 2,077,963, dated April 20, 1937, Serial No. 664,951, April I, 1933. Application for reissue April 17, 1939, Serial No. 268,406

42 Claims.

The kind of addressing machine to be described is one in which type wheels are selected and set under electrical control through the medium of code discs for printing a line at a time upon a succession of papers, as envelopes or bills.

This specification includes matter described and claimed in my co-pending application Ser. No. 603,582, filed April 6, 1932, and in my copending application Ser. No; 664,952, filed April 7, 1933. Through the improvements herein shown over the earlier application, the operation should be more rapid and adaptable to a greater variety of uses. The principal differences are in the use of type wheels instead of type bars, and the positioning of the wheels for printing by code discs. These latter are well known in the telegraph art, and are described in detail in United States Patent No. 1,821,110, issued to Morton and others for a stock ticker device.

Besides objects of the invention as set forth in the earlier application mentioned and the improvements through the use of code discs, it is an object of the invention to connect the rotating member of each set of code discs to its type wheel by means of shafts sleeved one over the other to permit axial alinement with the type wheel.

It is an object of the invention so to arrange and articulate the selectors for the code discs that the type wheels may be closely printing in a line.

,It is also an object of the invention to provide for the control of the perforated cards, which are described as the means of governing the operation of code discs for type selection, in such wise that in their successive movements a given card is positioned at the beginning of type wheel selecting movement for its predecessor card, and

the record of the first-mentioned card is withheld from the code discs next in order of operation until the record of the other has been printed.

The various objects of the invention are efiected by the mechanisms and circuits illustrated in the spaced for the register relays, and operate to select and position the type wheels.

Figure 5 shows in perspective three groups of type wheels, paper feed and ribbons, conventional type hammers, and their operating magnets.

Figure 5A is an end view of a type wheel, a section of paper, ribbon, and a hammer.

Figure 5B is an end view of feed and friction rolls, paper, and feed control cam and contacts.

Figure 6 is a top plan view of a conventional card feed, and associated cams, .with contacts, less wiring.

Figures 6A and 6B show details of elements of Figure 6 in end view.

Figure '7 includes fragmentary views of cards. Figure 8 is an end view of card feed and cards stacked for feeding.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary end view of a code disc and its several parts.

Figure 10 shows a conventional layout of the six-unit code according to which the cards are perforated.

Drscmr'rroN or Armm'rus The electrical circuits generally are not traced under this heading but under the sub-headings of the description of operation which follows.

Registers. Figure 1 Three groups of registers are shown, A, B, and

transfer relay, as Ill (Fig. 2).

record to the printing elements. Each register group, as A, has three shift relays, as l, 8, 9, one for each row of register relays. They are for the purpose of setting up circuits from contacts as- IA and 2D, and transferring the circuits through contacts as 1F, cable 31, cable 31 (Fig. 4), to the code disc operating magnets, as "B. The contacts of these shift relays I, 8, 9, are multiplied through cables 31, 38, 39, to like-positioned contacts in the B and C groups, for the purpose of making each of the printing control mechanisms,

denoted generally by 5!, 65, II (Fig; 4), common to the three rows of .relays, one in each of the three groups. The cables, 31, I8, 38, are broken oil at nearby points, and reappear in Figure 4, bearing like reference characters.

Relay 1 shifts the circuits from the first register relays, l to 3, to the number 1 printing control mechanism 33 (Fig. 4); relay I, from the second register relays to the number 2 printing control mechanism, relay 3, from the third like relays to the number 3 mechanism, ll. Like relays of the B and C register groups serve a like purpose. These relays are energized by contacts as 480 (Fig. 2), which in turn are controlled by cam wheel 88, and contact 543 of relay 54 (Fig. 3), which is deenergized on the completion of a printing operation.

Register relays, as 2, when selected through card perforations, are momentarily energized through the brushes, as BIA (Fig. 2), and the contacts, as 40A, of the transfer relay 40, and windings as 2A. Once energized, they look up through windings as 23, contacts as 2C, conductors as 43G, and contacts as 43D (Fig. 2); and remain energized until the record is transferred to the paper through the printing process. Each register relay, as 2, has a contact, as 2D, for the .purpose of setting up circuits from contacts as 1A through contacts as IF of the shift relay, as I, to the printing control mechanism, as will be described.

For the purpose-of this description, only three rows of relays in each group are shown--a row for each type wheel that may print a character in the address. Each row (and each illustrated character) for this purpose represents a line of print. In practice, there would be as many such rows in each group as the number of type spaces in a line. A single row may be termed a character register"; a plurality of rows (or, as here illustrated, a single row) representing a line, a line register. Each of the three groups illustrated includes three such line registers.

The selected relays in the three rows of the selected group are energized at the same time from brushes as QIA (Fig. 2), and through contacts of a transfer relay, as 40, as before stated, and are deenergized one row at a time as the character or line is printed.

For the purpose of this description, it is assumed that the register relays of the A group are the first to energize, at the start of operations; those of the B group, second; and those of the C group, third. They deenergize in each group in the order of the rows.

The relays of the A group energize and transfer the record of the first register to the first printing control mechanism, 59A to SSE, at D V (Fig. 4), for the top line of the'first paper, or the first portion of a continuous roll of paper, for a run, say, of checks or bills, to be later out off. Next, the relays of the B group energize and transfer the record of the first register to the first printing control mechanism for the top line of the second paper; at the same time, the sec-r ond register of the A group transfers its record to the second printing control mechanism, 35A to 65F, at E (Fig. 4), for the middle line of the first paper.

Last in the first cycle, the relays of the C group energize and transfer the record of the first register to the first printing control mechanism, 53A to 591-, at D, for the top line of the third paper, while the third register of the A group and the second register of the B group transfer their respective records to the third printing control mechanism, HA to HF, at F, for the bottom line of the first paper and to the second mechanism for the middle line of the second paper.

Deenergization of each row of relays immediately follows the printing of their record., The

first operation in the second cycle includes the printing of the top line of the fourth paper, the middle line of the third, and the bottom line of the second. i

Transfer relays, control cams and relays Figure 2 The transfer relays 40, 4|, 42, are for connecting to their respective register groups in turn all the contact bars and brushes closed by the perforations in a card, at one time, in order that the records of the card may be transferredpto respective registers for storage. Relays as are energized by contacts as 86A, by cam 85, as will later be described.

In Figure 2 is a side view of the cams for controlling the several registers, the transfer and shift relays, also three sets of brushes, and a side view of the bars and brushes.

The cams, B6, B1, 88, are all mounted on the same shaft. They are shown in position for the number 1 card. They are timed to coordinate their several relays with the card feed. They move degrees for each card, and control circuits to register the perforation positions on the register relays of the A, B, and C groups, with the effect of storage. The ejection of the first card and the placing of the second card follows immediately the beginning of the movement of the print control mechanism for printing the record of the first card and starts the movement of the cams to their next position.

Cam 88 is for the purpose of closing contacts 88A, 86B, 860, which control the energization of transfer relays 40, 4|, 42, in the order given, when this cam is in the position shown. Cam 8'! and contacts 81A, 81B, 810, are for the purpose of energizing, through windings as 43E, relays 43,

44, 45, on all movements, and holding energized two of the three relays, as 43 and 44, 44 and 45, 45, and 43, on completion of a movement. Cam 88 and contacts 88A, 88, 88C, are for the purpose of initially energizing, through windings as 46D, relays 46, 41, 48.

Relays 43, 44, 45, when energized are for the purpose of grounding contacts as 43D, 43C, 433, and holding energized the selected relays of the several registers when these are once energized from the contact bars and brushes, and releasing them row by row in the order outlined below. Contact 43D, through conductor 43G, 43G (Fig. 1) holds energized, until the printing operation is completed, such of the first rowof relays, l 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, of the A group as may have been energized. Contact 430 and conductor 43H, 43H (Fig. 1) have a like holding effect upon the third row in the B group; and contact 433, conductor 43J, 43J' (Fig. 1) upon the second row in the C group.

In a like manner, contacts 44D, 44C, 443, hold energized the second, first, and third registers respectively of groups A, B, C; and contacts 45D,

45C, 453, the third, second, and first registers re- 7 spectively of groups A, B, C.

The three relays are alike in construction and operation, and all have the same function; each relay has two windings, as 43E and 43F; windings 43E, 44E, 45E, are energized from their respective contacts 81A, 81B, 810, on each movement of cam 81; on the stoppage of the movement, one of the three windings, as 45E, is freed from this source of ground when the cam is positioned as shown in Figure 2; on the next movement, winding 43E is freed; and on the third movement, winding 44E. Each of the windings, as 45E, has as another source of energization conductor 46M and contact 46L so long as relay 46 is energized. This is for a purpose that will be'later described.

' The windings as 43F and contacts as 43A are for holding relay 43 locked after the initial energization of winding 43E; once energized. the relays at 43 are locked up by contact 463. It will be seen from the foregoing that each relay has three sources of energization; for example, relay 45: contact 310, conductor 81F, winding 45E; contact 46L, conductors 46M and 61F, winding 45E; contacts 45A and 46B, winding 45F. This arrangement is for the purpose of first energizing all three relays and later of momentarily deener- I gizing a relay, as 43, opening contacts 43D, 43C, 433, and releasing the energized register relays, as 2 and 5 of the A group. on completion of the printing operation of the first card, and later recnergizing relays as 43 for holding energized the selected register relays, as 21 and 26 for the second card, 32, 33, 34 for the third card. and 2 and 5 for the fourth card, as the several operations proceed. The manner in which the just enumerated storage relays are selectively energized will be explained more fully hereinafter in the description of operation. For each card, one of three relays will momentarily deenergize and release the energized register relays under its control, as described in detail under an operation heading.

Relays 46, 41, 48, are for the purpose of encrgizing the shift relays, as 1 (Fig. l), which set up circuits through the registers to the printing control mechanism, and for holding energized and later releasing relays 43, 44, 45. Each relay in its turn is first energized by a contact as 88A. and w ndings as 46D; once energized, it is held locked through windings as 45E, contacts as 46A, conductor 54E, 54E (Fig. 3), and contact 5413. and held energized until the printing operation concurrent with the sensing of the number 1, or 4, or 7, card is complete.

Contacts as 460, through conductors as 46G, control each a shift relay, in the same order as relays 43, 44, 45, control the continued energize.- tions of the register relays. Conductor 466 (Fig.

2), 46G (Fig. 1), leads to the first shift relay 1,

of the first register in the A group. Conductor 46G is multiplied to conductors 46X (Fig. 2) and 4611 (Fig. 1) to the third shift relay, i2, in the B group, and through conductors 46XX (Fig. 2) and 46J (Fig. 1) to the second shift relay, I4, in the C group. Contact 410 is wired in a like manner through conductor 41G, 41G (Fig. l) to the second shift relay, 6, in the A group, the first shift relay, Ill, in the B group, and the third shift relay, i5 in the C group. Contact 480 is wired through conductor 43G to the third shift relay, 9, in the A group, the second shift relay, II, in the B group, and the first shift relay, II, in the C group.

Contacts as 46K are for the purpose of making ineffective the closing of contacts as 41L and 410 until the relay, as 46, of the next higher order has deenergized. Contact 48K serves a like purpose for relay 46. This is more particularly described under the operation heading.

Energization of shift relays, as 8, from contacts as 410, is withheld so long as relays of a lower order, as 46, remain energized, due to the movement of a type wheel registering the record, as, for example, of the first card, and the positioning of the succeeding card. With this condition, cams 86, 81, 86, reach the second position, contact 81A is open, freeing winding 43E from this source of energization. Relays 46 and .41 are both energized, contact 4613 grounds conductor 46F, contact 43A, holding winding 43F enngizcd. Relay 46 releases, contact 4615 opens, rele. sing relay 43;

contact 46K closes a measured length of time after contact 463 opens, grounding contacts 41L and 41C; contact 411.. grounds conductors 41M and 31D, reenergizing relay 43. Contact 410 grounds conductor 41G, energizing shift relay 8,

to transfer the record of the second card to the printing control mechanisms.

Relays as 46, when initially energized by their 7 cam contacts, as 86A, are held energized by windings as 46E, contacts as 46A, conductor 54E, 54E (Fig. 3), and contact 543, during the movement of cam 66 from contact A to BBB, or so long thereafter as is needed for the printingcontrol mechanism to position the type wheels for the preceding card. With this arrangement, the second card is advanced at the beginning of the movement of the type wheels for printing the record of the first card, and the second card is ineffective until such printing is complete.

ill, 92, 93, indicate a side view of the bars and associated brushes.

Sundry mechanisms and circuits for printing, feeding cards, advancing paper, etc.

In Figure 3 are shown fragmentary side views of the toothed wheels, as 59J, of the six printing control elements (Fig. 4), and their associated contacts and wiring; the printing and card advancing control relays, 52, 53, 54; fragmentary views of the clutch 75 for advancing the paper; the paper feed control cam wheel 19; the clutch ill for setting in motion the card feed, and its control cam, 83; the test wheel 82 and its relay 55; the printing hammer magnets, I01, I08, I09; also a and view of the rocker arm, 95, its contacts 95A, and wiring for rendering the registers ineilective and stopping the action of the card feeding mechanism when the card feed box, 50, is empty.

There is a toothed wheel, as 59J, for each type wheel; it has a tooth foreach character space. The several wheels move in unison with the type wheels, and close contacts as 59K on each movement from one type space to the next. They are for the purpose of energizing relays 52, 53, 54, so long as any wheel is in selective motion.

Relays 52 and 53 are slow to release; relay 53 is the slower of the two. They are energized by contacts as 53K, on the selective movement of the type wheels. Relay 52 closes contact 52A and opens contact 52B; contact 52A starts the card feeding operation for the next card, at the beginning of the type positioning movement for the preceding card. On the deenergization of relay 52, contact 523 grounds contact 53A of relay 53, which remains energized a measured length of time after the release of relay 52, grounding conductor 53F, momentarily energ zing the printing hammer magnets I01, I08, I69. When energized, relay 53 sets up the above described circuit, and also through contact 533 energizes slow-to-release relay 54; when deenergized, contact 530 grounds contact 54A, grounding conductors 54F, 19C, 56A, momentarily energizing clutch 16, for starting the advance of the paper, 80 (Fig. 5).

Relay 54 is also a slow-to-release relay. When energized, it sets up the above described circuit,

setting movement of the type wheels.

in the recording position, conductor 95B, 353 (Fig. 2), grounding bars SI, 92, SI, for the next registering operation.

Magnetic clutches 1'6 (Fig. 3) and 8| (Fig. 6) are diagrammatically illustrated in the drawings, clutch I6 controlling the advance of the paper and clutch Bl controlling the feed of the cards.

Cam 19 (Fig. 3) is provided for insuring a full movement of the paper feed and for preventing the reenergization of relays 52 and 53 on the zero- Once energized, clutch 16 carries cam 19 forward, closing contact 19A during the passage of cam 19, continuing clutch I6 energized from this source until the zero position is reached. On this movement, contacts 1313 open, preventing reenergization of relays 52 and 53 during the interval following the release of the type wheels from their old setting and prior to their movement toward the new setting. Preferably, the relay 54 is so timed in its release that the shaft 16B and cam 19 will have completed their cycle of rotation, and contacts 193 will have closed again, shortly prior to the time the type wheels have been rotated through one character space toward their new setting.

Cam 83, through contact B3B, serves a like purpose for the card feed mechanism; clutch BI is initially energized through contacts 52A, conductor 52D, contact 553, if relay 55 is unenergized, conductor 55E, contact 83A, and conductor 513.

The test wheel 82 is for the purpose of preventing the reenergization of clutch BI and the consequent premature ejection of a card; on the final movement of cam 82 contact 82A is momentarily grounded, energizing winding 55C of relay 55, and locking up through winding 55D, contact 55A, conductor 52D, and contact 52A, if relay 52 should become energized due to a faulty operation, as the slow return of a. type wheel, which continues after the paper feed operation is complete. On the continued energization of relay 55, contact 55B is open, preventing energization of clutch 8|.

Key 56 is for the purpose of starting the feed roll to position the paper for the first operation. Key 51 is for a like purpose for positioning the first card. Rocker arm 95 is for the purpose of rendering the registers inoperative when the supply of cards is exhausted.

Code discs. Figure 4 In Figure 4 is shown a top plan view of nine sets of code discs, denoted generally by the characters 59, SI, 63; '65, 61, 69; H, I3, 15, arranged in three rows of three sets each. They and their associated type wheels (Fig. 5) occupy corresponding positions in Figures 4 and 5. Each set, as 59, GI, 63, consists of six discs and associated member; and is for the purpose of selectively positioning the associated type wheel of Figure 5. There is one type wheel for each set of discs.

These discs are of a well known type. They are described in United States Patent 1,821,110.

Each set consists of six discs, as 59A, 59B, 59C, 59D, 59E, 59F, and their operating magnets, as 58A, and shaft, as 59G, to which is attached a stop-arm, as 59H, a toothed wheel, as 59.1, which is also attached to shaft 59G, and contacts, as 58K, a pin guide plate, as 63F, and pins as 63X, as shown in Figure 9. The discs are loosely mounted on their respective shafts, and have conventional spacing collars. In practice, the guide plates and shafts would be provided with suitable moimtings and bearings; for the sake of clearness, these are omitted from the drawings.

There is a stop-pin for each character that may be printed: the selected pin is set in the path of the stop-arm through the movement of the selected disc, or non-movement of the discs.

The code disc magnets, as 58A, of the several sets are selectively energized by the correspondingly positioned register relays of Figure l, and "actuate their code discs to position the selected stop-pin in the path of the stop-arm, as 59H, stopping the shaft, as 58G, against the drag of the friction clutch, as 59L, positioning the associated type wheel at the selected position as represented by the perforations in the card. The shafts of the several code disc units have a common driving means, motor H3, which through the several gears and clutches transmits motion to the shafts, as 59G, through a friction clutch, as 59L. The sets 13 and 15, are shown in section to illustrate more clearly a stop-pin of each set and the arrangement of the shafts, which are sleeved one on top of another.

The toothed wheels, as 59J, have a tooth for each character space, which closes and opens contacts as 59K on the movement of the wheel from one space to the next for a purpose described in relation to Figure 3.

Type wheels, type hammers, paper feed. Figures 5, 5A; 5B

Figure 5 is a view in perspective of three groups of type wheels of three wheels each, with part of the middle group in section, to show the arrangement of the shafts, sleeved one upon another, and the several type wheels. The paper feed and printing hammers are also shown.

The type wheels, as Illl, are rigidly mounted on their respective shafts, as 59G, which are ex tended to the code disc units, as 59, which selectively position them by the stoppage of stop-arms, as 5911. They are for the purpose of setting up, one line of type at a time, on a group of type wheels, the records of the cards as they pass through the machine in operation. The several type wheels are illustrated in neutral position.

The paper, 80, is shown in a continuous piece, with feed roll 17 and idler 18 for advancing it on each printingoperation. Cam wheel 19, and associated contacts, are for the purpose of advancing the paper a measured distance on each operation There is a type hammer, as NA, for each type wheel, here shown in a draftsmans convention. Each hammer is riveted to the hammer bar, as H4, which is suitably pivoted at both ends. It is pulled downwardly by a magnet, as I01. and on release of such magnet it is pulled upwardly by spring 4B, causing the hammer to strike the ribbon, as I NC, the paper 80, and type wheel I In.

Figure 5A is an end view of a type wheel, III], a section of paper, 80, ribbon, I C, and hammer, INA.

Figure 5B is an end view of feed and friction rolls, 1'! and 18, paper, 80, and'feed control cam, 19, with associated contacts, 19A and 19B.

Card feed. Figures 6, 6A, 6B

Figure 6 is a top plan view of a conventional card feed, and associated cams, all of which are driven from shaft 8| A when coupled to shaft BIB by magnetic clutch Bl. Clutch 8| is for the purpose of setting in motion the card feed and cams and advancing each card to the recording position and there stopping it until its record is taken up by the selected registers.

Cams 82 and 83 are here shown with contacts less wiring. Cam I! is for the purpose of setting up a circuit to prevent the premature election of a card before the mechanism has completed the operation for the preceding card. Cam I8 is for the purpose of insuring a full movement of the card feed. They are shown in fragmentary end view in Figure 3, together with their complete circuits, and are there described.

Cams 88, 81, 99, are rigidly attached to shaft 95A. They are here shown without contacts or wiring. -Each cam has three positions: they move in unison with the card feed, being geared to shaft BIA through gears 84 and 88 with a ratio of three to one. They are shown in end view in Figure 2, with their wiring and associated relays, and are described in connection with Fig. 2

InFigures 6A and 6B are shown end view details of Figure 6.

Cards. Figure 7 This figure shows fragmentary views of three cards, 94, I82, I09, with their perforations for the examples of operation.

Card feed. Figure 8 The card feed is shown in end view, with gears as INA removed to show the mechanism more clearly. .The cards, 89, are stacked upon the platform, 90, with card 94 in position relative to contact bars 9|, 92, 99, and fingers as MB. The

cards are fed one at a time, with a momentary pause in the position shown, whereupon the bars are momentarily grounded, setting up circuits through the perforations to the fingers for energizing the selected register relays.

The cards are fed one at a time by a reciprocating cross-head feed, H1, and feed rollers H8, H9, I29, I; these rollers are rigidly attached to their respective shafts, 8A, 9A, INA, I2IA, as are their driving gears, I89 and I22.

Rocker arm 95 and contact 95A are for the purpose of stopping action of the registering elements when the cards are exhausted. It is shown with wiring and it is described in connection with Figure 3.

Code discs. Figure 9 Code layout. Figure 10 In Figure 10 is shown a conventional layout of the six-unit code which is assumed to be used in the equipment here illustrated.

Desoiur'rron or Osmrron Feeding the first card, registering the perforce tions, and printing the first line of the first card The paper 89 is fed into the machine and positioned between feed roll 11 and pressure roll 18; the cards, 89, are placed in the feed box 98. Switch 91 (Fig. 3) is normally momentarily pressed, energizing through conductors 51A and I'IB clutch 8|; shaft 9IA, gears 84, 85, 99, Hill, wheels", 93, and cams 89, 81,- 89, take motion;

contact 88A grounds conductor contact 993 closes, continuing clutch 9| enersized for one revolution of shaft BIA.

Contact "A is closed and opened by tooth 823 as wheel I! approaches the completion 'of its revolution: this movement is ineffective on the first of a series of cards. Gear 99 sets in motion the card feeding mechanism, and positions card 94 as shown in Figure 8.

With the movement of shaft 95A, cams 89, 91, 98, make one-third of a revolution. They are now assumed to be in the position shown in Figure 2. During the movement of cam 81, contacts 81A, 91B, 81C, were ductors 81D, 81E, 81F, energizing relays 49, 44, 45, through windings as 43E. Contacts 88A and 89A are closed; contact 88A grounds conductor 89D, energizing through winding 48D relay 48; 88D, energizing transfer relay 48; cam 91 opens contact 81C, freeing winding 45E from this source of energization.

Relay 43 is energized; contacts 48L, 49C, 463, 48A, are closed and 49K open; contact 46L grounds conductors 48M and 81F, reenergizing winding 45E of relay 45; contact 460 grounds conductor48G, energizing shift relay 1; contact 493 grounds conductor 46F and contact 43A: winding 43F energizes and remains energized so long as contact 493 remains .closed. Contact 48A sets up a holding circuitfor relay 45, to hold it energized until the type wheels are positioned for printing the record of the first card. Contact 46K frees conductor 46N and contacts 41L and 41 C from ground, so long as relay 48 is energized.

Relays 49, 44, 45, energizing, ground contacts as 43B, 43C, 43D, contacts 43D, 44D, 45D, grounding conductors 48G, 44G, 45G, and contacts as 2C, for locking up through windingsas 2B relays as 2, of the three rows of register relays. The card 94 is now positioned as shown in Figure 8; it engages rocker arm 95, closing contacts 95A. Relay 54 (Fig. 3) is deenergized, contact 54C grounds conductor 54D; contacts 95A are closed, grounding conductor 95B, 953 (Fig. 2), grounding bars 9|, 92, 93.

The card 94 (Fig. 7) is perforated for A, B, and C, each of which letters in this specification represents a line of the address. Through perforations 94A and 943 for A, representing the first, line, brushes MA and MB are grounded; for B, the second line, perforations 94C, 94D, 94E, and brushes 92C, 92D, 92E; and for C, the third line perforations 94F',- 94G, 94H, and brushes 93F, 99G, 99H, effect like circuits. The several brushes ground like-lettered contacts with the figures 49, of the relay 49. This relay is now energized, transferring the record of the perforations to the register relays; relays 2 and i for A; i9, l1, l8, for B; and I9, 20, 2|, for C; energizing through windings as 2A, and locking up through contacts as 20 windings as 23, and conductors 43G for the first row, G for the second, and 45G for the third.

Shift relay I is energized, contact IA is grounded, grounding conductor 1X, which grounds contacts 2D, 5D, 1F, 10, and through cable 31, 31 (Fig. 4) conductors 81A and 31B are grounded energizing magnets 98B and 59E, positioning discs 59B and 59E, and releasing the stop-pin for the letter A. Shaft 59G, toothed wheel 59J, and stop-arm 59H, take motion from friction clutch 59L. Type wheel 8 is driven forward to the letter A; the selected stcp-pinwhich has closed, grounding conbeen set in the path of stop-arm 59H, stops further movement, with the letter A in position for printing.

On the movement of toothed wheel 59.] from one tooth to the next, contact 59K is momentarily closed, grounding conductor 52C, contact 18B, conductor 52E, energizing relays 52 and 53 (Fig. 3). Relay 52 closes contact 52A, and opens contact 52B; contact 52A grounds conductor 52D, contacts 55B, conductor 55E, contact 83A, and conductor 51B, energizing clutch 8|, and setting in motion the card-feeding mechanism, as before described, to eject card 94 and replace it with card l02 (Fig. 7) Relay 53 closes contacts 53A and 53B, and opens contact 53C. Contacts 53A and 530 are not now effective. Contact 533 grounds conductor 53D, energizing relay 54, which closes contacts 54A and 54B, and opens contact 540.

On the movement of wheel 82, tooth 82B momentarily closes contact 82A, energizing winding 55C, opening contact 553 and closing contact 55A; this is without effect, as it is assumed that the type wheel IIO has reached its selected position, and on this stoppage of wheel 59J relays 52 and 53 are released. Wheel 83 reached its zero position, opening contact 8313, deenergizing clutch 8I, stopping motion of the card feed.

Relay 52 deenergized on the stoppage of wheel 59.], freeing contact 52A from ground. Contact 523 is grounded, grounding contact 53A, conductor 53F, energizing printing magnets I01, I08, I09, which attract their armatures against the tension of springs as I I4B, positioning hammers, as II4A, for a printing operation. Relay 53 releases opening contacts 53Aand 53B,and closing contact 530. Contact 53A frees magnets, I01, I08, I09, from energization, releasing their several armatures, effecting a printing operation. Contact 533 frees relay 5! from energization. Contact 530 grounds contact 54A, conductors 54F, 19C, and 56A, energizing clutch 16. Shaft 16B, feed roll 11, and cam 19, take motion; cam 19 closes contact 19A, continuing clutch 16 energized for one revolution of feed roll 11 and cam 19; when cam 19 completes its revolution, contact 19A, opens, clutch 18 deenergizes. The paper, 80, is advanced one position.

During the movement of feed roll 11 and cam 19, relay 54 deenergizes, opening contacts 54A and 543. Contact 54A frees conductor 54F from ground, preventing reenergization of clutch 16; contact 543 frees conductor 54E, 5413 (Fig. 2), contact 46A, and winding 46E of relay 46, from energization, with the effect to be later described.

On the ejection of card 94 and the positioning of card I02, cams 86, 81, 88, advancing one step; cam 86 opened contact 85A, releasing transfer relay 40; contact 863 closed, grounding conductor 86E, energizing transfer relay 4I. Cam 81 closed contact 810 and opened contact 81A; contact 81C continues winding 45E of relay 45 energized; contact 81A frees winding 43E of energization, though not releasing it. Cam 88 opened contact 88A and closed contact 8818; contact 88A frees winding 46D of energization, though not releasing it; contact 883 grounds conductor 88E, energizing winding 41D of relay 41, closing contacts 41L, 41C, 413, 41A, and opening contact 41K. Contacts 41L and 41C are ineflfective until relay 46 deenergizes and closes contact 46K.

frees contact 48A from ground, releasing relay 43; contact 46K grounds conductor 46N and contacts 41L and 41C.

Relay 43 deenergizing opened contacts 43D, 43C, 433, 43A. Contact 43D frees conductor 43G, releasing relays 2 and 5 for the letter A for the first card. On release of relay 46, contact 46K closes a measured length of time after contact 46B opens; contact 46K grounds conductor 46N and contacts 41L and 41C. Relay 41 is energized; contacts 41L and 410 are now grounded; contact 41L grounds conductors 41M and 81D, reenergizing winding 43E of relay 43, closing its several contacts. Contact 41C grounds conductor 41G, energizing shift relay 8; contact 41B grounds contact 44A, energizing winding 44F of relay 44; contact 41A sets up through winding 41E and conductor 54E a holding circuit for relay 41.

Relays 43, 44, 45 are energized, closing their several contacts. Contact 430 grounds conductor 43H, setting up a holding circuit for the third line (letter A) of the second card. Contact 440 grounds conductor 44H for the first line (letter B), and contact 450 for the second line (letter C). Contacts 44D and 45D continue to hold energized the relays for the second and third lines of the first card. Relay 54 deenergizing grounded contacts 54C, conductor 54D, contacts 95A, conductor 95B, 95B (Fig. 2), grounding bars SI, 92, 93.

Card I02 (Fig. '7) is now in place. It is perforated at I02A, I02B, I02C, for B; at I02D, I02E, IMF, for \C; at I02G, I02H, for A. Through correspondingly positioned brushes and correspondingly lettered contacts, preceded by the figures 4|, of the transfer relay 4I, relays 50, 22, 23, for B, 24, 25, 26, for C, and 21 and 28 for A, are energized, and lock up through their several contacts and windings as before described and conductors 44H, 45H, 43H, and contacts 44C, 45C,

Relay 41 is energized, grounding contact 410, conductor 41G, energizing shift relay 8 for the second line (letter B) of the first card; contact 410, conductors 41G, 41X, 41H, energizing shift Q relay I0 for the first line (letter B) of the second card.

On the energization of shift relays 8 and I0,

the records of the register relays I6, I1, I8, for the second line of the first card, and of relays 50, 22, 23, for the first line of the second card,

are transferred through correspondingly posi- Feeding the third card and printing the third line of. the first card, the second line of the second card, and the first line of the third card on the movement of wheels 53.1 and EU (Fig. 3), relay 52, 53, 54 are again energized, setting up circuits as before described to feed the third card, I03 (Fig. '7), and to advance earns 88, 31, 33 to their third position. Relays 52 and 53 release; contact 530 closes, grounding contact 54A, conductors 5415, "C, and 55A, energizing clutch l5, advancing the paper 83 one step to the third position. Contact 543 is also closed, grounding conductor 54E, 54E (Fig. 3), and contact 41A, holding relay 41 energized.

Cams B6, 81, 88, reach their third position; relay 54 releases, freeing contact 543 and conductor 54E, 54E (Fig. 2) from ground, releasing through contact 41A relay 41, opening contacts "L, 41C, 413, 41A, and closing contact 41K. Contact 41L frees conductor 41M from ground, placing relay 43 under control of contact MA. Contact 410 frees conductors 41G, 41X, 41H, from ground, releasing shift relays 3 and I3. Contact 413 frees contact 44A from ground, releasing relay 44. Relay 44 deenergizing opens contacts 44D, 44C, 44B, 44A. Contacts 44D and 440 free conductors 44G and 441-! from ground, releasing register relays i6, H, the second line of the first card, in the first register, and 50, 22, 23, for the first line of the second card, in the second register.

On release of relay 41, contact 41K closes a .measured length of time after contact 4113 opens.

Contact 41K grounds contacts 48L and 48C; relay 48 is energized; contacts 48L and 480 are now grounded; contact 48L grounds conductors 43M and ME, reenergizing winding 44E of relay 44, closing its several contacts. Contact 480 grounds conductor 48G, energizing shift relay 9, for the third line of the first card, also conductors 48K and 43H, energizing shift relay Ii for the second line of the second card, and conductors 48G, 48X, "XX, and 48J, energizing shift relay 13 for the first line of the third card.

Card I33 is in position, relay 54 is deenergized, grounding bars 9|, 32, 83, setting up circuits through perforations NBA, 1313., W3C, for its first line (letter C) I03D, I03E, IMF, for its second line (letter B), and HG and 131-1 for its third line (letter, A). The record of the card is transferred to correspondingly positioned brushes and correspondingly lettered contacts, preceded by the figures 42, of the transfer relay 42, energizing register relays 29, 30, 3|, for the first line, 32, 33, 34, for the second, and 35 and 35 for the third. The record of the third line (letter C) of the first card is transferred through cable 39, 39 (-Fig. 4) to code disc magnets 13B and WE, the record of the second line (letter C) of the second card, to magnets 64B, 64D, 54E, and the record of the first line of the third card (letter C) to magnets 53B, 53D, "E.

The type wheels H3, Ill, H2, are positioned for their respective letters, and the printing operations for the three proceed simultaneously, as before described.

The third card is replaced by the fourth. Circuits are set up as before described to energize the register relays of the A group and to print the first line of the fourth address, while the middle line of the third and the last line of the second are likewise set up and printed. In enerl3, for

gizing the register relays for the fourth and succeeding cards, it may happen that certain of the register relays for the third line of, say, the first card will still remain energized after the intelligence from the fourth card has been transferred to the register relays in that group. This will only be momentary, however, for the subsequent release of a control relay as 45, following the opening of a contact as 433 of a relay as 48 and prior to the closure of a contact as 43K,

will momentarily interrupt the holding-circuit as- 45G for the register relays corresponding to the third line of the-address, and the unwanted register relays, i. e., those used in conjunction with the first card but not with the fourth card, will Operatiom with unduly long or retarded movement of type wheels At the beginning of each printing movement,

and continuing so long as any of the several type wheels are in selective motion, toothed wheels as 59.1 close and open contacts as 59K, energizing relays 52, 53, 54; contact 52A, through the circuits before described, starts the card feeding mechanism to position the next card. In the event any wheel, as 59J, continues in motion after the card is positioned, action on it will be withheld, due to contact 54C being open, and withholding ground from bars BI, 92, 93 (Fig. 2).

'I'he'continued energization of relay 54, also continues contact 543, conductor 54E, 54E (Fig. 2) grounded, holding relay 4G energized, assuming the card to be the first, fourth, seventh, or a corresponding place in the series. With relay 45 energized, contact 48K continues open, withholding ground from contacts 41L and 410, with the effect as before described.

To prevent the ejection of the second card, due to the continued energization of relay 52, without registering its record, relay 55 is momentarily energized by tooth 82B and contacts 82A, as the second card nears its position; if relay 52 continues energized, contact 52A continues grounded, grounding conductor 52D, contact 55A, encrgizing winding 55D, holding contact 553 open, and preventing energizatlon of clutch 8| so long as relay 53 remains energized.

After the last card has been ejected from the machine and the last line has been printed under control of the register relay group' wherein the intelligence derived from this card was stored, the type wheels will commence their return to normal position, and will continue uninterruptedly in such movement. Contact 95A, Fig. 3, will be open .at this time, since no card is in sensing position, and will prevent ground from being-applied to the code magnets through the sensing bars and brushes. It may happen that the contacts 193 on the cam 19, Fig. 3, will close before all the type wheels have been restored to normal position. In this event the relays 52, 53 and 54 will reenergize. This will cause the clutch Bl to energize and send the shaft IIA through an extra cycle. Likewise, when the type wheels are all restored to normal, the deenerglzation of the relays 52,53 and 54 will cause the clutch 16 to send the shaft 15B through an extra cycle. Such extra cycles, however, do not result in any misoperation of the machine, since the card contacts 95A are maintained open at this time and no further energizetion of the code magnets can take place. It is only essential that the cam contacts 193 remain open during the interval between successive settings of the code magnets. Their closure during the zero-setting operation, after the last address has been printed, is 01 no consequence.

I claim:

1. In an automatic addressing machine, a plurality of rows of start stop printing wheels, each row suilicient to serve one entire line of an address at one time, a code disc stop-arm selector for each said printing wheel, transfer means for transferring to said selectors at one time all of the codes representing the intelligence of all lines to be printed at one time, and means to operate all of said rows of wheels to print at one time.

2. In an automatic addressing machine, a plurality of rows of printing wheels, each row of printing wheels sufficient to serve one entire line of the address at one time, a selector for each said printing wheel, and a set of sleeved shafts connecting said selectors to said printing wheels individually, means to adjust all the wheels of a line simultaneously and means to print said lines line by line successively.

3. A line-by-line printer, comprising a plurality of type wheels arranged in axial alinement with eachother, a plurality of code disc stop-arm selectors arranged in axial alinement with said type wheels, co-axial tubular shafting connecting each stop-arm to its corresponding type wheel, means for adjusting said selectors according to code, and means for printing.

4. A line-by-line printer, comprising, a plurality of lines of type wheels, a plurality of code disc selectors, one for each said type wheel, a plurality of code-registers, one for each selector, means for setting simultaneously all of said registers to register character codes, means for transferring line by line said character codes to said selectors, said selectors controlling said type wheels severally to present for printing the several characters represented by said character codes respectively, and means for printing.

5. A line-by-line printer, comprising, a plurality of type wheels, each of narrow lineal dimension and arranged side by side to form a line, a plurality of code discs and rotary stop-arm selectors, one for each type wheel, in each of which the smallest outside dimension is greater than the lineal dimension of its associated type wheel,

mechanical articulation in each said selector connecting said stop-arm and said type wheel for related movement, said type wheels being more closely spaced than said selectors.

6. In an addressing machine, controlled by a sensing record, a plurality of type wheels arranged to print simultaneously in lines, moto'r means to rotate said type wheels simultaneously and independently, selectors, one for each of said type wheels, adapted to stop said type wheels in selective positions according to code, sensing contacts and storage means settable simultaneously for a plurality of lines and controlling said selectors line by line and means for printing line b line. I

'7. A multiple line-by-line address printer for printing a plurality of lines simultaneously, comprising, a plurality of type wheels arranged in sets, a set of said type wheels for each line'of simultaneous printing, a plurality of code-controlled selectors, one for each type wheel, each selector controlling its associated type wheel to present for printing a type corresponding to a code set upon the selector, a plurality of registers,

one for each selector, means for setting said registers in groups, each group making registration of a unitary address and sets of registers in the 3 wheels in successive sets, and means for line-byline printing said address line by line.

8. A multiple line-by-line address printer for printing a plurality of lines simultaneously, com

prising, a plurality of type wheels arranged in sets, a. set oftype wheels for each line of simultaneous printing, a plurality of code-controlled selectors, one for each type wheel, each selector controlling its associated type wheel to present for printing a type corresponding to a code set upon the selector, a plurality of registers, one for each selector, means for setting said registers in groups, each group making registration of a unitary address and sets of registers in, the group pertaining to consecutive lines in the address, means for transferring the registration of successive lines to said selectors to adjust type wheels in successive sets, means for line-by-line printing said address line by line, and overlap means whereby a line each from a plurality of addresses are printed simultaneously.

9. In an addressing machine, a plurality of printing mechanisms comprising type wheels each having settable types, said printing mechanisms being each adapted to print one line of an address, means for moving a paper from printing mechanism to printing mechanism, means for printing upon said paper a plurality of lines of the address, successively, one line by each of said printing mechanisms, code selectors for selectively setting the type wheels of said printing mechanisms, and means in each said printing mechanism to reset said type wheels between successive printings.

10. In an addressing machine, a plurality of printing mechanisms comprising type wheels each'having settable types, said printing mechanisms. being each adapted to print one line of an address, means for operating said mechanisms successively, code disc selectors for selectively setting the type wheel of said printing mechanisms, means in each said printing mechanism to reset said type wheels between successive printings, and means for moving a receiving paper between successive printings.

11. In an addressing machine, a plurality of printing mechanisms comprising type wheels each having settable types, said printing mechanisms being each adapted to print a line of an address, means for operating said mechanisms successively to print upon a receiving paper, code disc selectors for selectively setting the type wheels of said printing mechanisms, means in each said printing mechanism to reset said type wheels between successive printings. and means for moving the receiving paper between successive printings through a distance other than the distance between printing mechanisms so that the spacing apart of the printings on the paper will be difierent from the spacing apart of said printing mechanisms.

12. In a card controlled addressing machine, printing means adapted to print a complete line at one printing impression, code disc selectors for setting up said printing means, a plurality of sets of storage relays, sensing means for searching a card and for setting all relays to register in code I manner in response to any records found in said only of the stored registrations of said sets of storage relays to control said printing means through said code disc selectors.

13. In a card controlled addressing machine, a printing mechanism, code disc selectors for setting up said printing mechanisms, a storage set of relays comprising a feeding relay, a plurality of groups of storage relays and a plurality of delivery relays; means including said feeding relay for electrifying in code manner all of said storage relays under control of a card, and means including said delivery relays for controlling said printing mechanism by group after group of said storage relays successively through said code disc selectors.

14. In a card controlled addressing machine, a printing mechanism, code disc selectors for setting up said printing mechanism, a storage set of relays comprising a feeding relay, a plurality of groups of storage relays, and a plurality of delivery relays; means including said feeding relay for electrifying in code manner all of said storage relays in accordance with a control card,

means including said delivery relays for controlling said printing mechanism by group after group of said storage relays successively through said code disc selectors, and a sequence system of contacts for controlling the sequential actions of said relays.

15. In a card controlled addressing machine, a series of printing mechanisms, code disc selectors for setting up said printing mechanisms, a plurality of storage sets of relays comprising feeding relays, groups of storage relays, and a plurality of delivery relays; means including, said feeding relays for electrifying in code manner a plurality of groups of said storage relays, variant groups successively by control of successive cards, and means including-said delivery relays for controlling independently said printing mechanisms through said code disc selectors.

16. In a card controlled addressing machine, a series of printing mechanisms, code'disc selectors for setting up said printing mechanisms, a plurality of storage sets of relays comprising feeding relays, groups of storage relays, and a plurality of delivery relays; means including said feeding relays for electrifying in code manner a plurality of groups of said storage relays, variant groups successively by control of successive cards, means including said delivery relays for controlling independently and simultaneously said printsaid printing mechanisms and said paper shift means whereby a plurality of lines of an address are read simultaneously from a card and stored and a variant plurality of lines of addresses are delivered simultaneously to said printing mechanisms for printing upon various papers being simultaneously addressed.

17. In an addressing machine, a plurality of printing wheels, a printing platen adapted to print from all of said wheels simultaneously controlling selectors for said wheels, one for each said wheel, and adapted to adjust said wheels simultaneously and independently to stop in printing positions respectively, and a detector circuit operative to prevent printing while any printing wheel is moving.

18. In an addressing machine, a plurality of start-stop printing members, common imprinting means, and electrical detector means to disable said imprinting means until all said printing members have stopped.

19. In an addressing machine, a plurality of 7 means.

21. In an automatic addressing machine, a plurality of rows of printing members each row sufficient to serve oneentire line of an address at one time, a code disc stop arm selector for each said printing member, transfer means for transferring to said selectors concurrently all of the codes representing the intelligence of all lines to be printed at one time, and means to operate all of-said rows of printing members to print at one time.

22. In an automatic addressing machine, a plurality of rows of printing members, each row comprising printing members suflicient to serve one entire line of the address at one time, a selector for each said printing members, and a set of mechanical connectors connecting said selectors to said printing members individually, means to adjust all of the printing members of a line concurrently, and means to print said lines, line by line concurrently.

23. A line by line printer comprising, a plurality of type members arranged in axial alinement with each other, a plurality of code disc stop arm selectors corresponding severally to said type members, mechanical linkage connecting each stop arm to its corresponding type member, means for sensing a transcribable code from a record card or the like, means for adjusting said selectors according to the sensed code, and means for printing from said type members line by line.

24. A line by line printer comprising, a plurality of lines of type members, a plurality of code disc selectors one for each of said type members, a plurality of code registers one for.

each selector, means for setting concurrently all of said registers to register character codes, means for transferring line by line said character codes to said selectors, said selectors controlling said type members severally to present for printing the several characters represented by said character codes respectively, and means for printing the presented characters.

25. A line by line printer comprising, a plurality of type members each of narrow lineal dimension and arranged side by side to form a line, a plurality of code disc rotary stop arm selectors one for each said type member in each of which the smallest outside dimension is greater than the lineal dimension of its associated type member, mechanical articulation in each of said selectors connecting said stop arm and said type member for related movement, said type members being more closely spaced than said selectors.

26. In an addressing machine controlled by a sensing record, a plurality of type carriers arranged to print in linesymotor means to drive said typecarriers into selective printing positions concurrently and independently, selectors one for each of said type carriers and adapted to stop said type carriers in selective positions according to code, code storage means settable concurrently and controlling said selectors line by line, and means for printing line by line from said individual types.

27. A multiple line by line address printer for printing a plurality of lines of variant addresses simultaneously, comprising, a set of type members for each line of concurrent printing, a plurallty of code controlled selectors one for each type member, each selector controlling its associated type member to present for printing a type corresponding to a code set upon the selector, a plurality of registers one for each said selector, means for setting said registers in groups each group making registration 01' a unitary address and sets of registers in the group pertaining to successive lines in the address, means for transferring the registration of successive sets, and line by line printing means for printing said addresses concurrently line by line.

28. In an addressing machine, a plurality of printing members, a printing means adapted to print from all of said members concurrently,

controlling selectors one for each said member and adapted to move said members concurrently and independently to stop in printing positions respectively, and detector means adapted to prevent printing while any printing member is movin 59. In an addressing machine, a plurality of start-stop printing members, common imprinting means, and electrical detector means energizable under control of a printing member while moving to delay the operation of said imprinting means.

30. In a printing machine, the combination of registers settable concurrently from selectable contacts in corresponding groups, printing elements, code disc stop arm selectors controllable respectively by said registers to set up said printing elements, and means for successively actuating successive groups of said selectors to set up said printing elements to print successively a plurality of lines according to the respective register settings. I

31. In a printing machine the combination of a series of groups of registers, means for setting the registers of a group from respective selectable contacts, means for so setting the series of registered groups successively, a plurality of printing elements, a plurality of code disc stop arm selectors, one for each printing element, and means for concurrently actuating the several selectors to set up the printing elements each according to a register setting.

32. In a printing machine, the combination of a group of registers each including locking relays settable from contacts representing respective lines of type, a printing element including a code disc stop arm selector and printingmeans, and means for actuating said selector to control successive printings according to the relays set for each type line.

33. In a printing machine, the combination of a series of registers, a series of code contacts, one for each register in any one series and settable according to codes for type characters, means for setting the several series of registers in rotation according to successive selections of said contacts, printing type elements, code disc stop arm selectors for positioning said type elements and controllable in common by the several series of registers successively, and means for repeatedly actuating said selectors according to successive register settings.

34. In a printing machine, registering means controlled by a card for registering representations of a large number of characters, printing means, and code disc stop arm selectors under control of the registering means for automatically setting up the printing means to simultaneously print a smaller number of characters than the characters registered in said registering means.

35. In a printing machine controllable from'a sensing record, the combination oi record sensing contacts, registers arranged in a plurality of groups and all settable concurrently by the control of said record sensing contacts, printing means, code disc stop arm selectors controllable by said registers for setting up said printing means, and means for successively actuating said selectors under control of successive groups of said registers to actuate said printing means to print successive lines represented by the records sensed by said contacts.

36. In a printing machine controllable from a sensing record, the combination of record sensing means, registers settable concurrently by said record sensing means, printing means, code disc stop arm selectors settable under control of said registers to set up said printing means, means for independently and successively actuating said selectors to set up said printing means under control of said registers, and means for successively operating said printing means to make an impression therefrom after set up thereof.

37. In a printing machine controlled by records each of which contains codes for a plurality of lines, storage means for the codes, printing means, code disc stop arm selectors for positioning said printing means, sensing means for transferring codes from said records to said storage means record by record, and transfer means for transferring codes from said storage means to said selectors line by line to thereby set up said printing means for printing line by line.

38. In a card controlled printing machine, a plurality of code registers, code contacts closable through perforations in a control card, means for closing circuits including said contacts and representing only codes for characters closable through perforations in said control card to operate said registers, a plurality of printing means, a plurality of code disc stop arm selectors, one for each printing means, and means for successively actuating said selectors under control of said registers one at a time to thereby set up said printing means one at a time.

39. In a record card controlled printing machine, storage means, means for sensing a card and entering at least a part of the record thereon in said storage means, printing means, code disc stop arm selector means, and means for actuating said selector means according to a record entered in said storage means whereby said printing means may be set up to print according to the record entered in said storage means.

40. In a printing machine, means for simultaneously sensing a plurality of lines of a record, a printing means for each line, code disc stop arm selector means for each printing means, and means for successively actuating said selector means to successively set up the printing means to successively print the sensed lines.

41. In, an addressing machine controlled by cards or the like bearing records consisting of a plurality of lines of printing, storage means, means for sensing a card or the like and simultaneously entering the record of anaddress in the storage means, printing means for separately printing the-.nnesor n addres's code selector means tor setting up said printing means, and means tor'success ively actuatin the selector means from said i-storege means tc successively print the lines; Qfjthe address.

42. In a printing machine iofsihfiitenousiy sensing a. plurality bi lines of]. ream on a card or the like, a registei meens for t'ransferring the 1 1 sensed lines 01 the record'into the register, printing means for separately printing the sensed lines,

code disc selector means for setting up the printing means and meansfor transterring the sensed lines to the selector means line by line to thereby I setup the printing xneans line by line.

CLYDE SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426049 *Sep 16, 1943Aug 19, 1947IbmRecord controlled multiple line printing mechanism
US5588761 *Dec 8, 1995Dec 31, 1996Seib; Ken L.Document printer having skew detection
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/58, 101/93.8
International ClassificationB41L47/58
Cooperative ClassificationB41L47/58
European ClassificationB41L47/58