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Publication numberUSRE21852 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1941
Filing dateAug 15, 1936
Publication numberUS RE21852 E, US RE21852E, US-E-RE21852, USRE21852 E, USRE21852E
InventorsHarry O. Anderson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible coated abrasive product
US RE21852 E
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- H. o. ANDERSON Re} 21,852 FLEXIBLE COATED RBRASIVE PRODUCT L 4 9 1 5 1 V. d J

I Original Filed Aug. 15.- 1936 HARRY U. ANDERSON Reissued July 15, 1941 Harry ,0. Anderson,

Norton Company,

Worcester, Mass., assignor to Worcester, Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts Original No. 2,123,581, dated No. 96,205, August 15, 1936. reissue May 11, 1939, Serial No.

4 Claims.

The invention relates to flexible coated abrasive products.

One object of the invention is to provide a coated abrasive which may be readily crumpied up and which is convenient to use. Another object of the invention is to provide a coated abrasive of open structure with fine grain. Another object of the invention is to provide a free-cutting coated abrasive product.

Another object of the invention is to provide a coated abrasive for rubbing down articles having irregular surface contours. Another object' of the invention is to provide a coated abrasive product particularly useful for furniture finishing and the like. Another object of the invention is to provide an open mesh abrasive cloth July 12, 1938, Serial Application for 273,149

particularly useful for household purposes, such as the scouring of pans. Another object of the invention is to provide a coated abrasive product to do work now to some extent done by steel wool and articles known as Chore boys." .Another object of the invention is to provide a coated abrasive product susceptible of being used in the manufacture of grinding wheels, grinding Another object of the indiscs and the like. vention is to provide an abrasive cloth with abrasive grains in the cloth as well as on one surface thereof which can be made into solid abrasive articles by using a number of layers of the cloth and uniting them with suitable plastic material. Another object of the invention is to provide an intermediate product for use in the manufacture of abrasive products, Other objects will be in part obvious or in part polntedout hereinafter. I

The invention accordingly consists in the featurw of construction, combinations of elements,

and arrangements of parts, as will be exempli-' fled in the structure to be hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawing,

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view showing one of many possible arrangements of apparatus for the manufacture of the flexible coated abrasive product of the invention;

Figure 2 is a plan view of'one embodiment of the product of the invention on an enlarged scale;

Figure 3 is across sectional view of the embodiment of Figure 2; and v Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3, showing in longitudinal section a modification of the invention.

lolcrrinl first to Figure l, I provide a roll tained during use III of leno cloth. Leno cloth is woven cloth in which the warp is divided into pairs of ends and when the shed is changed, one end of each pair is moved over and across the other end of each pair. Thus, instead of the warp ends being one up and one down,

ent invention is concerned is that the weave produces an open mesh material and, furthermore, the open character of the weave is mainof the material. In other words, there is much less tendncyof the warp to run together and bunch, or of the weft to do the same, than in the case of a cheese cloth, for example. A cheese cloth is a cloth with the warp and weft spaced so as to' make an 'open structure but made with a plain weave. So far as certain features 'of the invention are concerned, I might use acheese cloth or any open mesh cloth whether made with a plain weave or not, but I prefer to use the leno cloth in some form. So far as ce'rtainfeatures of the invention are concerned, it may be embodied in knitted goods but the tendency to stretch and to pull out of shape cit such goods is such .that I prefer to use woven goods embodied in leno cloth as aforesaid.

which supports or standards are not shown as is well understood in the coated the mounting of the various elements disclosed may be carried out in any suitable manner and abrasive art. Considering, therefore, the diagrammatic view of Figure 1, I provide a roller II and a roller ll over which the sheet I! of leno cloth is drawn. I provide further a receptacle it for a suitable adhesive, which may be roller it extends below the level of the liquid in the container I4 and. therefore, coats the sheet II with the adhesive. Any known or desired adhesive may be used. For example. any one of the various glues may be employed or any one of the waterproof binders including those containing the drying, non-drying, and semi-dryin oils, and also such binders as incorporate any one of the resins either natural or artificial. For

alternately, as in a plain weave, they are in twistedrelation to each other. Leno which may include suitheated if desired. A.

1 example, shellac or a varnish may be used or,

on the other hand, a synthetic resin product may be employed. i

I further provide a pressure roller ll around which the sheet It extends. By reason'of the open structure of the leno sheet II, it 'will be coated with adhesive not merely on one side but on both sides.

I provide an abrasive grain hopper I I. This may be filled with abrasive grain ll of any desired type, for example fused alumina, otherwise known as aluminum oxide abrasive, emery, conm- 'dum, silicon carbide, garnet, quartz, sand, or

even diamond bort. The abrasivegrain II in the hopper I! may be delivered by the roller ll located in the bottom of the hopper.

I provide a roller 20, a roller 2|, a roller 22,

ing chamber may take any usual or desired form and the sheet Il may be disposed therein in festoons according to the usual practice.

Considering now the deposit of the abrasive grain II, it lands on, what I arbitrarily term the upper side of the sheet ii of leno cloth and some of it adheres to the upper side of the warp or the weft thereof. Some also adheres to the sides of the warp and the weft of the leno cloth and is, therefore, located in the interstices of the fabric. Stating this in another way, there is a geometrical space between the one surface of the fabric and the .other surface of the fabric which .is of measurable proportions and some of the abrasive grain is between these planes.

Some ,of the grain, however, passes through the openings in the leno cloth and this lands on what I term the back side of the cloth after it has passed over the roll 20. The back side of the warp and weft is, therefore, coated with abrasive grain and some more attaches itself to the cloth in between the planes aforesaid and exists in the interstices of the cloth. However, some of the grain passes through the cloth a second time and this fails on the upper side of the cloth after it has passed around the roller 2|. Such of the abrasive grain as passes through the cloth a third time lands on the back side thereof after the cloth has passed around the roller 22. By

thus passing the abrasive grain through the cloth four times, it receives and retains as much thereof as can be held in place by the binder employed; the remainder falls into the receptacle 2|.

After the cloth has passed through the dryin chamber 28, the abrasive grain is stuck to it. It

now passes over a roller 30, then down around a roller SI and under a roller 32, then upwardly to a roller 3!, and then in contact with a roller 34 which extends into liquid adhesive in a receptacle I0. This liquid adhesive may be what is commonly referred to as a sizing coat. The sheet ll now goes around a pressure roller 31, over a roller 08 to a second drying chamber 00 where the roller 83 in contact with the sheet l3 and by reason of the sizing coat it will adhere to the sheet II and form a backing=for the sheet l3. When using the roll 45 of paper, I prefer to thread the sheet I! so that it shall not pass four times .below the hopper I1 but rather pass over the roller 10, then under'the roller 22, and then over the roller 21, as shown in dotted lines in Figure 1. Thus, according to this embodiment of the invention, only one side and the interstices of the sheet I! is coated with abrasive grains. Any other expedient may be adopted for this purpose. for example the use of a suitable baflie or shield plate.

Considering now the product of the invention, I

the intersticesbetween warp and weft; as shown in Figures 2 and 3. It will be observed that the individual abrasive granules are shown as smaller in diameter than the warp or the weft. Leno cloth is preferably made with warp of less diameter than the weft insomuch as there are two ends of warp twisted together and if the usual or preferred square arrangement as shown in Figure 2 is to be achieved, there will be twice as many the material may also be festooned. Thence the sheet ll goes over a roller II and to a take-up roll II of the finished product.

Considering now a modification of the inventioh. I may provide a roll it of paper the width of-"which is substantially the'same as the width of the sheet IQ. This is arranged in such a po- I sition' that the sheet ,46 of paper may pass over warp ends as there are weft threads. Stating this in another manner, preferably the pick is one-half the sley, thus making the openings square, and in order that the actual weight of yarn in the warp and weft shall be the same, the count of the warp ends is twice that of the weft. I prefer that the abrasive grain shall be smaller in diameter than the diameter of the war-pin order, that good adhesion may be secured and in order to avoid a condition in which the abrasive grains too readily become detached from the fabric. Forexample, using 's warp and 40'sweft, I prefer to use abrasive grain as fine as 400 mesh size and I prefer to produce afabric of the order of 20 picks per inch and of sley 40 ends to the inch. However, the invention has no limits in this respect; leno cloth of only 10 picks to the inch or even less may be employed if desired and,

on the other hand, especially if very fine grain is used, for example 000 to 1000 grit size, leno cloth of 50 to picks per inch or even finer may be employed.

Considering now the embodiment of Figure 4,

'paper II of a thickness the same as or less than that of the sheet I! will preferably -be employed. Any type of paper may be used within the limits of the invention and, furthermore, for the sheet 40 of paper I may substitute cloth with a close weave. Cloth with a plain weave but with the warp and weft-close together, or cloth with any fancy weave in which the warp and weft are close together, is quite distinct and different from leno cloth. Cotton cloth of such a nature cannot be seen through and, furthermore, abrasive grain will not pass into it or through it. Ordinary paper is also impervious to'abrasive grain, as is well understood. Therefore, the embodiment of Figure 4, even where cloth is used, represents two distinct types of fabric with abrasive grain stuck to one of them and-of such anature that an open abrasive structure is produced, yet in which the individual sranulesare relatively fine. Such and is almost plastic.

' size.

an abrasive structure has characteristics that are quite distinct and individual. It is free-cutting and at the same time cutting lines are exceedingly fine.

The product of Figure 2 and Figure 3 may be crumpled and used to polish or abrade any irregularly shaped article. It can be efficiently used for the scouring of pots and pans. Whereas acoated abrasive product such as is generally referred to as sandpaper resists being crushed into a ball and even then presents non-abrading portions and flat portions, the product of the invention can be rolled into almost any shape If a waterproof binder is used, it is especially useful for abrading articles under water or with water.

The article of Figure 4 has distinct characteristics. The paper 46 may, if desired, be waterproof paper so that the coated abrasive product of Figure 4 may be usedunder water or wet. It has an open, very free-cutting structure, and at the same time the abrasive grains are of small These characteristics produce a cutting action unlike that of any. heretofore known product.

' Whereas a cotton leno cloth has been specifically referred to, it should be understood that. other yarns may be employed. Furthermore, the apparatus described is exemplary only and any other suitable apparatus or coating method may be employed. For example, the electrostatic I claim:

1. A coated abrasive product comprising warp and weft woven into an open mesh leno weave cloth, an adhesive, and a quantity of abrasive grain some of which is smaller in diameter than the diameter of the weft, the abrasive grain being stuck to the leno cloth by the adhesive on at least one surface of the leno cloth and some of the abrasive .grain being stuck to the warp and weft and being between the surfaces of the leno cloth, substantially all of the grain projecting from the adhesive and being free from adhesive on its outside portions away from the warp and weft respectively.

2. A coated abrasive product comprising warp and weft woven into an open mesh leno cloth, an adhesive, and a quantity of abrasive grain some of which is smaller in diameter than the diameter of the weft,'the abrasive grain being stuck to the leno cloth by the adhesive on both surfaces of the cloth and some of the abrasive grain being stuck to the warp and weft and beingbetween the surfaces of the cloth, substantially all of the grain projecting from the admethod of coating now well known in actual l practice may be used, if desired.

It will thus be seen that there has been provided by this invention an article in which the various objects hereinabove set forth together with many thoroughly practical advantages are successfully achieved. As many possible embodiments maybe made of the above invention and as many changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawing is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

hesive and being free from adhesive on its outside portions away from the warp and weft respectively.

3. A coated abrasive product comprising warp and weft woven into an open mesh leno weave cloth, a quantity of abrasive grain some of which is smaller in diameter than the diameter of the weft, an adhesive securing such abrasive grain to the leno cloth, a backing impervious to the abrasive grain, and an adhesive securing the leno cloth to the backing, substantially all of the grain projecting from the adhesive and being free from adhesive on its outside portions away from i the warp and weft respectively.

4. An abrasive article comprising open mesh leno cloth, finely divided abrasive material, and adhesive material impregnating the cloth and attaching the abrasive material thereto.

HARRY O. ANDERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2778169 *Oct 20, 1953Jan 22, 1957Bay State Abrasive Products CoFlexible abrasive bands
US2814171 *Aug 2, 1955Nov 26, 1957Bogart George AAbrading machine
US5674122 *Oct 27, 1994Oct 7, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyAbrasive articles and methods for their manufacture
US6243934 *Jun 7, 1995Jun 12, 2001Appleton Coated, LlcPaper polishing belt and method of polishing paper