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Publication numberUSRE23786 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1954
Filing dateOct 23, 1951
Publication numberUS RE23786 E, US RE23786E, US-E-RE23786, USRE23786 E, USRE23786E
InventorsRichard K. Baisch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Armor shield for projectile type
US RE23786 E
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1954 R. K. BAISCH ARMOR SHIELD FOR PROJECTILE TYPE FASTENINGS' 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed Oct. 23, 1951 Inventor fiihardgflazkfih Z. 0 M 4 Aiiorney Feb. 23, 1954 R. K. BAISCH ARMOR SHIELD FOR PROJECTILE TYPE msmumcs 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Original Filed Oct. 23, 1951 mural 1117,9110

5 Richard [61 1761219071 A 5 3 "iffy/'1 u",

Reissued Feb. 23, 1954 ARMOR SHIELD FOR PROJECTILE TYPE FASTENINGS Richard K. Balsch, Cottage City, Md., assignor to Remington Arms Company, Inc., Bridgeport, Conn., a corporation of Delaware Original No. 2,594,275, dated April 29, 1952, Serial No. 252,788, October 23, 1951. Application for reissue March 18, 1953, Serial No. 343,274

4 Claims. (Cl. 144.5)

(Granted under Title 35, U. 5. Code (1952),

see. 266) Matter enclosed in heavy brackets I: appears in the original patent but forms no part of this reissue specification; matter printed in italics indicates the additions made by reissue.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States for governmental purposes without the payment to me of any royalty thereon in accordance with the provisions of the Act or April 30, 1928, (Ch. 460, 45 Stat. L. 46'?) The usual method of securing fastenings for wire-mold pipes and the like to concrete or brick walls, floors, and ceilings of buildings has been to use a hammer drill or a pneumatically operated drill to make holes for expandible anchors which grip the sides of a hole. This is an expensive and tedious job and tests have demonstrated that studs of one quarter of an inch in diameter would fail by pulling out of the holes at about 900 pounds per square inch.

Recently developed tools use the explosive force of powder to drive tapered studs into concrete and even steel. These have shown that studs applied by explosive force required a force of 3800 pounds per square inch to pull them out of a supporting structure such as a concrete floor. The time saved by using these very powerful and efilcient tools can result in a great saving in time and a corresponding reduction in labor cost, but for the fact that the use of these tools introduces a very serious hazard to the lives and limbs of the workmen handling the tools as well as others who may be within the range of drive pin which escape laterally from beneath the tools or from flylng fragments of stone, concrete, metal-scale, etc.

My invent on provides a safe-guard against accidental injury to mechanics while they operat such explosively operated tools which project tapered drive pins into supporting structures for fastening thereto wire-mold, pipes or the like. It comprises an armor shield provided with a guiding aperture for the muzzles of such tools and a. retaining flange which is tapered inwardly toward the center of the shield for stopping and retaining within the armor shield ricocheted projectiles, fragments of concrete, stone, metalscale, etc., which may escape laterally from beneath the nozzles of such tools at sufficient velocity to maim, or even kill, persons within the range of the projectiles.

In the accompanying drawings, which illustrate several embodiments of my invention:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of one modification which illustrates the use of my invention for attaching a wire-mold junction box.

Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of my armor shield, a junction box base, and portions of the bases of three radiating wire-molds.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section of my armor shield in a plane parallel to the picture plane of Fig. 1, showing a junction box base, a portion of an explosively operated attaching tool, and a drive pin in position for projection from the tool through a metal junction box bas into a supporting concrete floor.

Fig. 4 illustrates three of numerous modifications of drive pins which may be projected from the tool.

Fig. 5 is an elevation, partly in section, of a modification of my shield designed to be clamped over the muzzle of a tool for attaching lengths of the base of wire-mold.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged perspective bottom view of the modification illustrated in Fig. 5.

Fig. '7 is a plan view of a third modification of my shield designed for anchoring pipes to supporting structures by means of brackets.

Fig. 8 is an elevation of this third modification.

Fig. 9 is a section on the line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is an enlarged perspective view of the form shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9.

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of a fourth modification which is designed primarily for attaching anchoring angle-irons to floors.

Fig. 12 is a section on the line [2-42 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is an elevation of my shield as seen from the right of Fig. 11, a section of angle-iron which is included in Fig. 11 being omitted.

Fig. 14 is an enlarged bottom perspective of the open right hand end of this armor shield.

Fig. 15 is a perspective bottom view of a fifth modification.

In the modification illustrated in Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive, indicates one of several tools now on the market which eject projectile-type fastenings 2| by explosive force. It is shown in operative combination with my armor shield 22 provided with a tool receiving aperture 23. My

shield 22 is provided with concentric annular flanges 24 and 25 which enclose chambers 26 and 21. The flange 24 is provided with a plurality of wide shallow slots 28, each of which merges into deeper terminal slots 29 to form U-shaped slots to receive a U-shaped base section 30, 01' a common form of wire-mold. The inner flange 2i 3 is similarly slotted with a shallow slot II and terminal deeper slots 52 which align with those in the flange 24. The flange 25 also provides a centering means for properly aligning the tool 25 with the junction box base 33.

My shield 22 and the flanges 24 and 25 are made of metal of suflicient toughness and thickness to prevent accidental penetration by laterally deflected fastenings and the faces 34 and 35 Y of these flanges are tapered inwardly to insure the retention within the chambers of my shield of all flying fragments and drive pins 2|, thereby protecting the operator of the tool and others within a possible range of drive pins which may ricochet, instead of embedding themselves as intended in a supporting structure.

The modified armor shield 42 which is illustrated in Figs. and 6 is designed especially for use in attaching continuous strips of wire mold base to floors, walls and ceilings. It has a threaded aperture 43 for a set screw 44 for attaching the shield 42 to a tool 25. The shield is provided with an annularflange 45 having a face 45 which is tapered inwardly toward the shield opening which is closed when in use by the structure against which the shield is pressed and is also provided with a plurality of air escape vents 41. The flange 45 is provided with U-shaped slots 45 and 45 for receiving a U-shaped wire mold base 35.

A pipe 55 for water or electric wiring clamped on walls or ceilings by a bracket 5|, may be attached by using a modified armor shield 52 illustrated in Figs. 7 to 10, inclusive. This shield is also provided with a radial threaded hole 53 for a set screw 54 by means of which it may be detachably secured to a tool 25. It is provided with an annular flange 55 having a tapered face 55, a weight-reducing annular recess 51, and a channel 55 for straddling a pipe. A drive pin with a threaded extension and a nut 55 will be used for bolting the bracket 5| over the supported pipe 55.

A further modification of my shield is illustrated in Figs. 11 to 14, inclusive, which is designed for attaching an anchoring angle-iron 50 to a floor. A handle 5| is provided for quickly shifting this armor shield 52 which is also provided with a tool-receiving aperture 53. The end flange 54 and side flanges 55 are tapered as indicated in Figs. 12 and 13, and form three sides of a missile-confining chamber 55, the remaining side of which is provided by the angle-iron 50. As additional protection against the escape of misdirected fastenings, there are provided an apertured'tool-muzzle-confining block 51 rigidly united with the armor shield 52. A channel 58 has inwardly inclined flanges 55 and is pivotally mounted near the closed end of the shield 52 on a shaft 15. In this modification, the channel 55 provides additional protection against injuries due to ricocheted projectiles whenever this shield is used on an uneven floor which might leave a crack between the sides 55 and the supporting floor. In Fig. 15, there is illustrated an armor shield 12 which lacks the U-shaped notches 45, 45 of the modification of the shield illustrated in Fig. 6. This modification is designed for use in attaching fastenings of the types illustrated in Temple, No. 2,549,993, Fig. 4, and Dunn, No. 2,504,311, Fig. 9.

It has a tool receiving aperture 13 for an attaching tool 25, not shown in this view.

The shield 12 is provided with a marginal flange II which, unlike the preceding modifications, has no notches.

The inner surface 15 of the flange 15 extends .4 outwardly and upwardly from the outer margin of the flange to form a missile confining surface to prevent any scattering of pieces of metal or of the material into which the fastenings are inserted. This shield 12 is provided with a plurality of small pressure relieving vents I1, and a threaded aperture 15 for a set screw (not shown) for clamping the shield 12 to a tool 25.

The vents 11 provide a sole means for relieving pressure within this shield.

Whenever the nature of a job permits the fastening of my shield to the tool as illustrated in Figs. 5 to 10, inclusive, and Fig. 15, one workman, instead of two, may use the tool on ceilings with less need for using goggles to protect his eyes from grains of sand or particles of dirt which may be loosened by the shock of the explosion of each pin projecting charge. In each of the modifications illustrated in Figs. 1 to 10, inclusive, the surfaces of the shield are knurled to prevent slipping while handling. It will be noted that ordinarily the muzzle of the explosively operated tool is merely inserted loosely in the aperture in the armor shield so that the tool is permitted to recoil with respect to the shield. It will be further noted that the volume of the shield as compared with the volume of the barrel of the tool is substantial, thus providing a chamber for the expansion of the powder gas.

While I have shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention, changes may be made in the construction and arrangement without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed herein.

What I claim is:

1. An armor shield provided with an aperture through its upper surface for receiving the muzzle of a tool adapted to insert explosive propelled fastenings, an integral marginal flange thereon forming a missile confining chamber with a. surface against which said flange is held, the inner surface of said flange extending from its outer edge upwardly and outwardly to form a confining surface to arrest any flying pieces of material scattered by explosive force, said armor shield being provided with pressure relieving vents.

2. An armor shield provided with an aperture on its upper surface for receiving the muzzle of a tool adapted to insert explosive propelled fastenings, an integral marginal flange thereon forming a missile confining chamber with a surface against which said flange is held, said flange being notched for straddling an article to be fastened to a supporting structure, and the inner surface of said flange from its outer edge extending outwardly and upwardly to form a confining surface to prevent any scattering of pieces of metal or of the material into which the fastenings are inserted, said shield being provided with a plurality of gas pressure relieving vents.

3. An armor shield provided with an aperture on its upper surface for receiving the muzzle of a tool adapted to insert explosive propelled fastenings, an integral marginal flange thereon forming a missile confining chamber with a surface against which said flange is held, said flange being notched for straddling an'article to be fastened to a supporting structure and to provide a gas Pressure relieving vent, and the inner surface of said flange from its outer edge extending outwardly and upwardly to form a confining surface to prevent any scattering of pieces of metal or of the material into which the fastenings are inserted.

4. An armor shield for a tool comprising a barrel having an exterior surface and adapted to v explosively propel a fastening device, said shield comprising an upper member having therein an aperture adapted to receive the muzzle of such barrel and being bounded by a surface slidably engaging on the exterior surface of said barrel form with such surface and said upper member a gas expansion and missile confining chamber.

RICHARD K. BAISCH.

Reierences Cited in the file of this patent or the original patem UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,549,993 Temple Apr. 24, 1951 2,558,230 Barron June 26, 1951

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2946060 *Apr 7, 1958Jul 26, 1960Powers Wire Products Company IClip positioning head for fastener driving tool
US3066302 *Jun 8, 1956Dec 4, 1962Olin MathiesonPower tool
US5785478 *Mar 7, 1997Jul 28, 1998Rotter; Martin J.Fastener