Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE24716 E
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1959
Filing dateOct 31, 1955
Publication numberUS RE24716 E, US RE24716E, US-E-RE24716, USRE24716 E, USRE24716E
InventorsGeorge W. Anselman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air flow conveying system
US RE24716 E
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 6, 1959 G. w. ANSELMAN ETAL Re 24,716

AIR FLOW CONVEYING SYSTEM Original Filed Oct. 31, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet gl Oct. 6, 1959 G. w. ANSI-:LMAN ErAL Re- 24,716.

AIR FLow CONVEYING SYSTEM Original Filed Oct. 3l, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet g mi@ @my 3f f M d @www United States Patent O AIR FLOW CONVEYING SYSTEM George W. Anselman, Elgin, and Gilbert A. Babcock,

Franklin Park, Ill., assignors to Whirl-Air-Flow Corporation, a corporation of Illinois Original No. 2,794,686, dated .lune 4, 1957, Serial'No. 543,875, October 31, 1955. Application for reissue May 11, 1959, Serial No. 812,571

Matter enclosed in heavy brackets appears in t he original patent but forms no part of this reissue specification; matter printed n italics indicates the additions made by reissue.

This invention relates to air flow conveying system more particularly for transportation through piping of granular or otherwise discrete and particulate material, which, in one instance, as here particularly referred to, may be foundry sand for the making of sand molds or cores. v

The transporting by air pipes of pneumatic tubes of cash cylinders in department stores, for example, is well known and it is also known that granular or discrete material such as foundry sand, gravel and concrete mixes, -and the like may be somewhat similarly conveyed from a place where they are prepared or mixed to another place, perhaps some distance away, where the material is put to use. A serious problem, however, which has heretoforebeen encountered in such pneumatic or air conveying systems for material such as sand has been the high rate of abrasion of the interior surface of the pipes and the tendency of the pipes to become clogged with the material being transported.

An important object of the present invention is the provision of a conveying system of the class referred to in which wear on the pipes is substantially minimized and clogging is prevented while at the same time a more rapid and constant ilow of material is insured, whereby maintenance and operational costs are reduced and delays due to replacement or clearing out of the pipes are substantially eliminated.

In accordance with the present invention, the air current in the conveyor pipe is given a spiral motion so that the path defined by a current of air through the pipe takes the form of a helix adjacent the inner periphery of the pipe, thus causing the air, in addition to providing a forwardly moving medium or vehicle in which the material particles or the like are entrained, to provide an air buffer or cushion that inhibits or minimizes contact of the material with the inside of the pipe and at the same time keeps the material stirred up and in suspension in the air current so as to maintain aeration and prevent depositing of the material along the lower areas of the pipe.

Following the present invention, air jets are provided that are directed both forwardly and circumferentially with respect to the pipe and, in the preferred form of the invention here disclosed, such angled jet arrangement is provided not only in the initial stage of the conveying system but also at intermediate points therealong whereby to provide spiral air boosters. In the initial stage, preferably, such jets are adjustable.

The invention contemplates both method and apparatus.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description, taken together with the accompanying drawings, showing an illustrative embodiment of the invention, and in which drawings- Figure l is a general view, somewhat diagrammatic, of an air ilow yconveying system incorporating the present invention;

'ice

Figure 2 is a fragmentary view showing the lower end of the charger hopper or transporter shown in Fig. l, ori a somewhat larger scale, Fig. 2 being partially in sectionl and being broken away for clearness of description;

Figure 3 is a further enlarged cross section taken on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2;

Figure 4 is an enlarged vertical section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Figure 5 is a front elevational view, broken away to save space, of an air booster ring, two of which are shown spaced along-the pipe in Fig. l;

Figure 5a is a diagrammatic view corresponding somewhat to Fig. 5;

Figure 6 is a diametrical section taken on the line 6--6 of Fig. 5;

Figure 6a is another diagrammatic view corresponding somewhat to Fig. 6;

Figure 7 is a view of one of the jet fittings shown in Figs. l, 2, 3 and 4;

Figure 8 is an axial section of the fitting of Fig. 7;

Figure 9 is a phantomized view of a portion of pipe and one of the air boosters, diagrammatically showing the helical path of the air through the pipe; and

Figure l0 is a somewhat diagrammatic cross-section of Fig. 9, further showing the helical path of the air and the concentration of the sand away from the inner periphery of the pipe.

i Referring in detail to the illustrative construction shown in the drawings, the transporter or charging hopper 11 is adapted to receive prepared and conditioned sand from a sand muller or other mixing means and prepared for use, for example, for the making of sand molds or cores in metal foundries. The hopper 11 is provided at its upper end with a closure 12 which may be operable by a pneumatic jack 13 by auxiliary means vwhich need not be here described. The jack may be in control of an electric circuit including the wires 14, through a switch 15, and actuates or deenergizes a solenoid valve 16 that is in control of a supply of air under pressure available at the air line 17. When the closure 12 is open for purposes of charging the hopper 11 with sand from the mill, the solenoid valve 16is deenergized and the valve mechanism thereof closed. When the gate 12 is closed, after the sand has been deposited, the solenoid valve 16 is energized and the valve mechanism thereof opened to admit air under pressure to the universal coupling 18 from which air is distributed equally to the three branch air lines 19, 20 and 21. The line 19 carries the air to a header 22 that encircles the lower conical end 23 of the hopper 11. The header 22 is in communication with the plurality of, and in this instance three, air manifolds 24 which lie along the exterior of the conical part 23 of the hopper 11, circumferentially spaced therealong,

- and diverging, with the hopper, upwardly from the header 22. 11a are legs for the hopper.

In accordance withthe present invention, interiorly of the inverted conical portion 23 of the hopper 11, the walls thereof are perforated by tapped holes 25 along conically diverging lines registering with the manifolds 24 respectively. As best seen in Fig. 4, there are here shown fourteen such aligned holes for one of the manifolds and in each of said perforations 25 there is screwed a jet fitting 26, which as best seen in Figs. 7 and 8, has a threaded shank 27 that is screwed into the tapped aperture 25 and a head 28 projecting into the interior of the hopper 11. The head 28 is provided with a jet nozzle 29 extending at right angles to the head 28. The bore 30 of the shank 27 is in communication through the head 28 with the bore 31 of the jet nozzle 29, the latter bore 31 being angularly located in the jet Vnozzle 29 so that, by rotation of the nozzle 29 in the head 28, which is made possible by the threaded exterior 32 of the jet nozzle screwing into the, tapped mouth 33. of the head, the jet nozzle may be rotated so as to cause the mouth 34 of the jet to have a possible 360 movement around the center line 35 passing transversely tlirhilgh the head and axially threugh the let nozzle The degree O'f Slant or 'regulation .of the here 31 of the iet from the eeriter line 35 is in this iristanee 15?-, The iet lifting 2.61'S thus adjustable in two direetions. iirst, by means Of the Serew connection 27, in a plane parallel to a plane tangent te the wall of the hopper, and, Second, in another plane transverse to the plane of tangency by means of the .serew eoriheetiea .3.2. and .the Slaritiris here 3l 0i the iet nozzle 25.`

It will be understood that air under pressure from the header g2 passes through each of the manifolds l.24 and from the latter through the apertures 25 and the jet iittings v26. By adjusting `the ttings in one or both of the ways already described, the air entering the hopper,

Vbest .seen in Fig. 3. may be direeted .either in a .herizontal plane or in planes tilted either upwardly or downwardly from the horizontal. As best seen in Fig. 4, for example, of the fourteen jets of a row, the upper one is here shown directed upwardly, the 1intermediate jets are shown directed horizontally, and the lower jets of the -rew are Shown directed downwardly. The iet which is directed upwardly at the upper end of the row serves the purpose of keeping the `sand stirred up in the hopper s o as to facilitate its free movement and aeration therein. The jets directed horizontally serve the purpose of creating a swirling action which begins to direct the sand in ,a spiral path, and the jets directed downwardly, .at the lower end of the row, serve to cause this spiral path to take the form of a helix, as it moves `out through the lower end .of the hopper and into the delivery pipe 36. There the air maintains this helical spiral path `as best seen in Fig. 9.

As indicated in Fig. l0, the air denoted by the arrows 37 forms a buffer between the inner periphery'SS of the pipe 36 and the mass of sand 3.9 moving therethrough under the force `of and entrainedwiththeair. As ,at present advised, an explanation of the .reason vfor this may well be that the velocity of the air .immediately adjacent the inner periphery 3.8 of thepipe 36 is reduced somewhat by friction, thereby increasing the .pressure at .the periphery with a consequent .differential .of'fpressure drop toward vthe area adjacent .the ofwjthe pipe', the sand taking the path of least resistanebeing caused .to travel generally adjacent they axis of .the pipe .with the advantageous result that contact `of'thesarid with the inner periphery of the pipe is .minimized and abrasion and vwear on ,the pipe is inhibited or at yleast markedly reduced. i i

It will be best seen from Fig. 3 that the jet ttings 26 are uniformly arranged to cause the airl to ytravel in a clockwise spiral. The angular adjustments for the jet fittings already described are vthus ina directionmboth forwardly and circumferentially of thepipe, harmonizing with the helical spiral pathpreviously described. i

Further in Maccordance with" the present mvention, in

`order to compensate for air loss and maintain the for- Ward helical Path foflhe air., aS herereferredto, throughout the' laugh 0f the dlitery .Pipe 36, which 'maybe vquite long, in some cases Vseveral'hundred feet or indre,

it is desirable `to provide, as here shown, booster means Vso that there are a plurality of means creating a yhelical .path for .the air, spaced apart .nal/ongthe pipe. `As

indicated in Figure l, two of such air boostermeans are shown indicated at 38 and 39.J Theseair booster means are advantageously at places where there is a turn or bendinthe pipe or just after the turn.

The air line N20 .already referred to vextends from the y`1:J1 1 iv.ersa.l 1,8hto the l,air booster 3.8 ,and the air line 2.1 from the universal 18 .tothe air Vbooster 391u Each" of these air boosters 38 and 39 may comprise a hollow or 21 as the case may be, leads as at 41. The ring 40 is interposed in the pipe 36 between sections thereof as indicated in Fig. 6, gaskets A2.12 and 43 facing the ring ou each side. Flanged couplings on the pipe ends may be clamped together and to the booster ring as by bolts 44 (Fig. 9). i

The booster ring 40 is hollow as by having the annular ehairiher ft therein, from which eharhber are direetesi the jet apertures spaced cii'ciinifereiitially aboutithe ring 40, there being in this instance eight apertures. Each of these jet apertures 46 is directed so as to maintain the veloel'c.vy`l1fsredirection of air through the pipe "36 and is directed bothciicumferentially forwardly. In this instance, the degree" of inclination, from the axis of the pipe, for the forward direction of the jet aperture is 22, while the degree of inclination from the axis 0f the pipe for'the circumferential direction of the orifice, is 10; Thus both a circumferential and a forward boosting action is given'itothe air by the booster ring 40 this action of the booster rings is such yas to regenerate or boost the spiral helical action given to the air initially by Athe jets 26 in the charging hopper l11.

Reverting to Figs. 5a and 6a, the plane of tangency previously referred to is indicated at A, while a piane normal to the plane of tangency is indicated'at B. C may represent the circular line of the jet Vapertures which coincides in general with the internal periphery of .the delivery pipe 36. D `is the axis of the ring which also corresponds lto` the axis of the pipe. {I t will be understood that the diagrammatic views of Fig. 5a and Fig. 6a are rotated ninety degrees one with respect to the other both with respect to vthe line B and also with respect to the line A, that is, in a plane coinciding with the axis and in a plane coinciding with the diameter. By this dual rotation of the views of Figs. 5a and 6a it will be seen that 46a represents diagrammaticzally the line of vdirection of one and the same jet aperture 46 showing its two Components ef direction, and the ,Same .is true 0f each jet aperture 46.

Figs. 5.a and 6a illustrate the inclination of each jet aperture at a Il0" angle to a plane B normal to the plane of tangency A (which may be said to be in'a direction centrifugally of the pipe) and lat an angle of 22 from the plane of tangency A (which imay be said to' be in a .direction ,forwardly ef the Pinel Similarly with respect `to the jet fitting 26, .the angle of these fittings shown in lthe lower end of Fig. 4 corresponds to an angle lfrom a .plane .normal ,te the Plane .0f tangeney (as .iii -Fis- 5a) vwhileftljie lan'gleof the jet orifice 34 shown in Fig.l 8 corresponds tothe angle ,from theplane of tangency (as in 6a), although Kthe degree of angle may `vary.

.In each case, that is iwith v,respect to `the jet fittings 26 .and the jet aperturesl46the yinclination is such as torgive adirection `.having yboth a forward component and a circumferential component to provide and maintainthe spiral helical path for the air in the delivery pipe .36, .fertll .purnoseshereinahove referred te- ,Bv reasehef the dual .adiustahllity ,of the iet turing, .26. Saeh anales may he established/asv to effect an optimum of the desired result.

The air propelled sand is finally delivered to avreceiver .which is in the natureof a receiving hopper .cylindrical at its top and tapering at its 1lower end to form a delivery chute .4.8. As the sand and ail-,under pressure .enters ,the

the to deliver the sand.

v"Qhanges may `rrrade as" fall `within the scope yof `the appended claims without departing from they invention.

What is here claimed is:

1. In an air llow conveying system for discrete material of the class described, a funnel-shaped charging hopper for the material, said hopper having at each of at least three points spaced substantially equidistant therearound a longitudinally extending manifold for air on the outer surface thereof, rows of longitudinally aligned perforations in the hopper wall registering with the manifolds respectively, an air jet fitting inserted in each perforation, each said tting comprising a hollow externally threaded shank screwed into the perforation, a hollow head projecting from the shank into the hopper, and an externally threaded jet nozzle extending at right angles from the head and rotatably adjustable in internal threads in the head, said nozzle having a bore therethrough extending angularly to a center line passing transversely through the head and axially through the nozzle, a material delivery conduit in communication with the lower end of said hopper, an air booster interposed in said conduit, said booster comprising a hollow ring having inclined jet apertures therein communicating with the interior of the ring and with the pipe, said jet apertures being directed both circumferentially and forwardly in the direction of air ow, a cover for the upper end of the hopper, a source of air under pressure, said booster being in communication with said source, a header about the smaller end of the hopper in communication with the manifolds and with said source, and electrically actuated means causing closing of the cover to admit air from said source into both said header and said booster whereby to swirl the air in said hopper and to propel air under pressure in a helical path through said conduit.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein some of the jet nozzles are directed in the opposite direction from the flow of the air in the conduit. y

3. In an air flow conveying system for discrete material of the class described, a funnel-shaped charging hopper for the material, said hopper having at each of at least three points spaced substantially equidistant therearound a longitudinally extending manifold for air on the outer surface thereof, rows of longitudinally aligned perforations in the hopper wall registering with the manifolds respectively, an air jet fitting in each perforation, each said tting comprising a hollow shank screwed into the perforation, a hollowl head projecting from the shank into the hopper, and a jet nozzle extending at right angles from the head and rotatably adjustable in the head, said nozzle having a bore therethrough extending angularly to a center line passing transversely through the head and axially through the nozzle, a material delivery conduit in communication with the lower end of said hopper, a cover for the upper end of the hopper, a source of air under pressure, a header about the smaller end of the hopper in communication with the manifolds and with said source, and electrically actuated means causing closing of the cover to admit air from said source into said header whereby to propel air under pressure in a helical path through said conduit.

4. In an air ow conveying system for discrete material of the class described, a funnel-shaped charging hopper for the material, said hopper having longitudinally arranged perforations in the hopper wall, an air jet fitting in each perforation, each said fitting comprising a hollow shank screwed into the perforation, a hollow head projecting from the shank into the hopper, and a jet nozzle extending at right angles from the head and rotatably adjustable in the head, said nozzle having a bore therethrough extending angularly to a center line passing transversely through the head and axially through the nozzle, and a material delivery conduit in communication with the lower end of said hopper.

5. The structure of claim 4 wherein an air booster ring is interposed in the conduit spaced from the hopper, said ring having inclined circumferentially spaced jet apertures therein, said apertures being inclined more nearly in a direction axially forwardly than circumferentially of the conduit.

6. In an air flow conveying system for discrete material, a generally funnel-shaped charging hopper for the material, a plurality of air jet ttings carried by the hopper in a plurality of longitudinally extended circumferentially spaced series of longitudinally spaced fittings, each series extending generally upwardly from adjacent the lower end of said hopper, each tting having a iet outlet within the hopper opening outwardly adjacent to and generally parallel to the adjacent portion of the peripheral wall of the hopper, said fittings being adjustably connected to said hopper for rotational movement of said iet outlet about a generally horizontal axis generally radially disposed with respect to said hopper, a plurality of longitudinally extending manifolds for air connected to said hopper, one associated with each of said series of fittings and in communication with the air jet )ittings thereof, and a source of air under pressure in communication with each of said manifolds.

References Cited in the tile of this patent or the original patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 640,463 Gildea Ian. 2, 1900 857,096 McCord lune 18, 1907 960,023 Knight May 3, 1910 1,451,272 Robinson Apr. 10, 1923 1,566,536 Hoving Dec. 22, 1925 1,707,335 Van Brunt Apr. 2, 1929 1,746,395 Herdemerten Feb. 11, 1930 1,796,215 Peikert Mar. 10, 1931 1,819,346 Tolman Aug. 18, 1931 2,221,741 Vogel-Jorgensen Nov. l2, 1940 2,404,203 Zimmerman July 16, 1946 2,714,043 Glaza July 26, 1955

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5429156 *Nov 23, 1993Jul 4, 1995Ueda; KazuyukiPneumatic transmission apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/95, 406/92
International ClassificationB22C5/16, B65G65/00
Cooperative ClassificationB22C5/16, B65G65/00, B65G2814/0229
European ClassificationB65G65/00, B22C5/16