Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE31173 E
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/067,362
Publication dateMar 15, 1983
Filing dateAug 17, 1979
Priority dateSep 30, 1976
Publication number06067362, 067362, US RE31173 E, US RE31173E, US-E-RE31173, USRE31173 E, USRE31173E
InventorsAlexander C. Daswick
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sporting shoe
US RE31173 E
Abstract
.[.The present invention relates to certain novel and valuable improvements in sporting shoes used for running or jogging..].
.Iadd.A sporting shoe has a relatively rigid sole whose longitudinal center portion is convexly curved in a longitudinal direction to form a pedestal about which the shoe rotates. It also has resilient sole portions at the heel and toe. .Iaddend.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(3)
What is claimed is:
1. A sporting shoe comprising:
an upper housing;
a relatively rigid sole disposed beneath and secured to said housing.[., the bottom surface of said sole being convexly arcuately curved in a longitudinal direction so that its longitudinal center portion provides a pedestal, whereby when a runner wearing the shoe lands upon a running surface with the heel portion of said sole the runner's foot and the shoe will then roll forward in a pivotal movement about said pedestal.].;
a first resilient auxiliary sole member secured to the heel portion of said rigid sole; and
a second resilient auxiliary sole member secured to the toe portion of said rigid sole.Iadd.; and
the bottom surface of said rigid sole being convexly arcuately curved in a longitudinal direction so that its longitudinal center portion provides a pedestal;
whereby when a runner wearing the shoe lands upon a running surface by engaging same with said first auxiliary sole member, the runner's foot and the shoe will then roll forward in a pivotal movement about said pedestal.Iaddend..
2. A shoe as in claim 1 wherein said auxiliary sole members are spaced apart sufficiently to leave said pedestal exposed to direct contact with the running surface.
3. A shoe as in claim 1 wherein said auxiliary sole members have inner end portions which meet at the location of said pedestal; and which further includes means pivotally securing said end portions to said pedestal.
Description

An object of this invention is to provide the athlete with a sporting shoe which will reduce the time and energy required to run or jog while resulting in a running or jogging movement more comfortable than has been possible in the past.

A further object of this invention is to accomplish a more effective distribution of the athlete's weight along the entire length of the shoe as it makes contact with the running surface, thus aiding in the prevention of physical injury to portions of the lower extremities.

The invention may be more fully understood by referring to the annexed drawings and descriptions hereinafter given.

DRAWING SUMMARY

FIG. 1 is a side view, partially in cross-section, of a shoe made in accordance with the preferred embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a side view partially in cross-section, of a variation of the invention of FIG. 1.

FIG. 1 illustrates a shoe A having a housing or upper portion 2 and a relatively rigid sole 3. The housing or upper part 2 is made from soft materials in a conventional fashion. The rigid sole 3 is preferably made of hardened rubber but may also be made of any other type of relatively rigid material. The bottom surface 4 of the sole 3 is convexly arcuately curved in a longitudinal direction so that its longitudinal center portion provides a pedestal 5.

A first resilient auxiliary sole member 6 is secured to the heel portion of the rigid sole 3, and is preferably made of a highly resilient rubber or other elastomeric material. A second resilient auxiliary sole member 7 is secured to the toe portion of the rigid sole 3 and also extends underneath the area where the ball portion of a wearer's foot will be located. The auxiliary sole members 6 and 7 are spaced apart sufficiently to leave the pedestal 5 of the rigid sole 3 exposed to direct contact with a running surface. Resilient sole member 6 is of substantial thickness underneath the rearward extremity of the rigid sole 3 and its under surface is convexly arcuately curved even more than the surface 4 of the rigid sole 3.

Both the forward extremity of the rigid sole 3 and the forward extremity of the auxiliary sole member 7 are curved upwardly in front of the toe portion of the shoe housing or upper part 2. Sole member 7 is relatively thick underneath the toe portion of the shoe, and its bottom or outer surface is curved to form nearly a half circle at the forward extremity of the shoe. However, the rearward extremity of the sole member 7 has a relatively flat under surface and a substantially triangular cross-sectional configuration which tapers down to zero thickness just forward of the pedestal 5.

When the shoe A of FIG. 1 is worn by a runner the runner may land upon a running surface .[.with.]. .Iadd.at .Iaddend.the heel portion of the rigid sole 3. If so, the runner's foot and the entire shoe will then roll forward in a pivotal movement about the pedestal 5. Initial contact of the shoe with the running surface occurs at the rearward extremity of resilient .[.shoe.]. .Iadd.sole .Iaddend.member 6, which is then compressed in a direction shown by double-headed arrow 8. As the shoe rolls forward on the rigid sole 3 the direction of compression within the resilient material of sole member .[.8.]. .Iadd.6 .Iaddend.changes as a continuous function. Before the runner springs off the surface again the resilient sole member 7 comes into contact with the running surface and the resilient sole member 6 is lifted away from it. The direction of compressive force within the auxiliary sole member 7 changes continuously until it finally approximates that shown by the double-headed arrow 9, shortly before the runner uses his toes to spring away from the running surface.

The auxiliary sole members 6 and 7 are secured to the rigid sole 3 along its curved surface 4 by cement, staples, tacks or other means having sufficient binding or securing capabilities. The sole 3 is attached to housing 2 by any conventional means.

The resiliency of the lower heel portion 6 acts to cushion the impact created by the runner's foot as it makes initial contact with the running surface, and furthermore, this resiliency in conjunction with the rigidity of the sole 3 and the shapes of the various sole portions enables the athlete to spring forward with greater ease and comfort than could have been experienced by him in the past. Thus, the initial compression of the lower toe portion 7 provides stored energy which then aids the runner in springing away from the running surface.

The rigid sole 3 is, in a mechanical and functional sense, an internal structure which serves to support the weight of the runner in a relatively constant fashion as the angular relationship between his foot and the running surface changes. Specifically, as the entire shoe and the runner's foot rolls forward in a pivoting movement about the pedestal 5, the support of the foot itself by the rigid sole 3 remains relatively unchanged.

FIG. 2 illustrates a variation of the present invention, a shoe B wherein the housing or upper portion 11 may be identical to that of the prior embodiment, and the rigid sole 12 is identical or closely similar in configuration to the rigid sole 3. The rigid sole 12, however, is preferably constructed of a light metal alloy and hence is both stronger and more rigid than the sole 3 of FIG. 1. A resilient heel member 15 is of generally similar configuration to the sole member 6, while a resilient toe member 16 is of configuration generally similar to that of the sole member 7, except that the auxiliary members 15 and 16 have inner portions which meet at the location of the pedestal 5. A hinge 17 pivotally secures the inner end portions of the sole members 15, 16 to the rigid sole 12.

Each of the sole members 15, 16 has a plurality of vertical recesses 13 formed in its upper surface, and a coil spring 14 is received in each one of the recesses. Corresponding to each recess 13 in one of the resilient sole members 15, 16 is a shallow recess 12a in the rigid sole 12 which receives the upper end of the coiled spring 14 and holds it in position. Thus the coiled springs 14 enhance the compressive and expansive ability of the resilient sole members 15, 16 in and of themselves, and at the same time the hinge 17 serves to guide and confine the movement of the sole members 15, 16 and also prevents lateral slippage or displacement of the springs while they are performing their function of compression and expansion.

The invention has been described in considerable detail in order to comply with the patent laws by providing a full public disclosure of at least one of its forms. However, such detailed description is not intended in any way to limit the broad features or principles of the invention, or the scope of patent monopoly to be granted.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435976 *Jul 21, 1945Feb 17, 1948Eugene L MonaginShoe sole with curved groundcontacting face
US2606105 *Dec 3, 1948Aug 5, 1952Wells Robert FMiniature novelty shoes
US2810213 *May 17, 1956Oct 22, 1957Jonas Jerry JFootgear
US3964181 *Feb 7, 1975Jun 22, 1976Holcombe Cressie E JunShoe construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5572805 *Nov 1, 1994Nov 12, 1996Comfort Products, Inc.Multi-density shoe sole
US5592757 *Mar 21, 1995Jan 14, 1997Jackinsky; Carmen U.Shoe with walking sole
US6564476Feb 2, 2000May 20, 2003Bbc International, Ltd.Flex sole
US6782639 *Jul 31, 2000Aug 31, 2004Negort AgFootwear for a dynamic, rolling walking-action
US7287340 *May 18, 2004Oct 30, 2007Sydney Design Technologies, Inc.Energy translating mechanism incorporated into footwear for enhancing forward momentum and for reducing energy loss
US8061059May 29, 2008Nov 22, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear for increasing stability and lateral performance
US8230618May 29, 2008Jul 31, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with arch wrap
US8505215Oct 7, 2011Aug 13, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear for increasing stability and lateral performance
US8758207Jun 29, 2010Jun 24, 2014APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd.Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US9003677 *Apr 20, 2011Apr 14, 2015Crocs, Inc.System and method for toning footwear
US9055788May 6, 2014Jun 16, 2015APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd.Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US9357812May 21, 2014Jun 7, 2016APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd.Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US20040205983 *May 18, 2004Oct 21, 2004Sydney Design Technologies, Inc.Energy translating mechanism incorporated into footwear for enhancing forward momentum and for reducing energy loss
US20070283599 *Jun 16, 2007Dec 13, 2007Sydney Design TechnoloEnergy translating footwear mechanism for enhancing forward
US20090077830 *Oct 9, 2007Mar 26, 2009Tae Sung LeeSeesaw- motion footwear sole
US20090183393 *Jul 10, 2008Jul 23, 2009Rynkorea Co., Ltd.Midsole of Masai Walking Specialized Shoes
US20090293308 *May 29, 2008Dec 3, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of Footwear for Increasing Stability and Lateral Performance
US20090293310 *Dec 3, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of Footwear with Arch Wrap
US20100093500 *Dec 14, 2009Apr 15, 2010Avi ElbazProprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US20120096744 *Apr 20, 2011Apr 26, 2012Goodsmith TracySystem and method for toning footwear
US20150040433 *Aug 8, 2014Feb 12, 2015Oped AgOrthopedic shoe for preventing excess pressure loads
DE4319650A1 *Jun 14, 1993Jan 20, 1994Salvatore GiambalvoWalking or running shoe with longitudinally rounded shape - covers four centimetres more ground for each step
DE4319650C2 *Jun 14, 1993Jul 2, 1998Salvatore GiambalvoLaufschuh
EP0687425A1 *Jun 14, 1995Dec 20, 1995Alfeo ScozzoliFootwear outsole with differentiated elasticity, particularly adapted for running and other sports
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/30.00R, 36/114, 36/32.00R, 36/103
International ClassificationA43B13/14, A43B13/18, A43B13/12, A43B5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/143, A43B13/18, A43B13/146, A43B13/182, A43B13/12, A43B5/06
European ClassificationA43B13/18, A43B13/14W, A43B5/06, A43B13/12, A43B13/18A1, A43B13/14W4