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Publication numberUSRE33429 E
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 07/305,667
Publication dateNov 6, 1990
Filing dateFeb 3, 1989
Priority dateMar 23, 1981
Fee statusPaid
Publication number07305667, 305667, US RE33429 E, US RE33429E, US-E-RE33429, USRE33429 E, USRE33429E
InventorsEric S. Abrutyn
Original AssigneeDow Corning Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crosslinked polymer beAD
US RE33429 E
Abstract
This invention relates to solid emollient-moisturizer compositions, and in particular relates to compositions wherein an emollient-moisturizer is entrapped in the lattice of the cross-linked polymer during in situ polymerization of the monomers forming the polymer lattice. The invention provides for conversion of solid and/or liquid emollients or moisturizers into solid, free-flowing forms by entrapment of the functional materials in a hydrophobic polymer lattice.
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Claims(17)
What is claimed is:
1. .[.A.]. .Iadd.In a cosmetic or toiletry composition, the improvement which comprises a .Iaddend.solid, lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer composition comprising:
from approximately 5% to approximately 95% by weight of a cross-linked syneresis-free hydrophobic polymer lattice;
from approximately 95% to about 5% by weight of an emollient or moisturizer;
the monomers of said cross-linked copolymer and said emollient or moisturizer being polymerized in situ; and
said emollient or moisturizer being dispersed uniformly throughout and entrapped within said polymer lattice.
2. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein said emollient or moisturizer is selected from the group consisting of:
a straight, branched or cyclic hydroxyl alcohol containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
a straight, branched or cyclic carboxylic acid containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
an acid ester containing C1 to C30 carboxylic acid esterified with a C1 to C30 hydroxyl alcohol; and
a hydroxy alcohol ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
a carboxylic acid ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
an alkane of the formula H--(CH2)n --H wherein n is 5 to 30;
lanolin and its derivatives.
3. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein said cross-linked polymer matrix comprises:
a functional cross-linking monomer selected from the group consisting of di- or polyfunctional monomers having at least two polymerizable double bonds; and
a monofunctional monomer selected from the group consisting of polymerizable monomers having one double bond.
4. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 3, wherein said polyfunctional cross-linking monomer is a poly-unsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of a mono- or or di- or polyester of mono-, di-, or polyvalent alcohol, and alpha-beta unsaturated carboxylic acid, polyunsaturated polyvinyl ether of a polyvalent alcohol, mono- or polyunsaturated amides and cycloaliphatic esters of alpha-beta unsaturated carboxylic acids.
5. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 3, wherein said monofunctional monomer is selected from the group consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophylic monounsaturated monomers.
6. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, including a fragrance in the amount of about 10% to about 90% by weight of said emollient or moisturizer.
7. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, including an oil soluble cosmetic dye in an amount of about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of said emollient and/or moisturizer.
8. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, including a cosmetic pigment in an amount of about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of said emollient and/or moisturizer.
9. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein said emollient or moisturizer is 2-ethylhexyl hydroxystearate which is entrapped in said polymer lattice.
10. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein said emollient or moisturizer is mineral oil.
11. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein arachidyl propionate is entrapped in said polymer lattice.
12. A .[.lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein said functional material is a siloxane.
13. A .[.lattice-entrapped.]. composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein a siloxane selected from the group consisting of polydimethyl siloxane, polytrimethyl siloxane, polyhexamethyl siloxane and polyphenylmethyl siloxane is entrapped in said polymer lattice.
14. .[.A.]. .Iadd.In a cosmetic or toiletry composition, the improvement which comprises a .Iaddend.solid, lattice-entrapped cosmetic composition comprising:
from approximately 5% to approximately 95% by weight of a cross-linked syneresis-free hydrophobic polymer lattice;
from approximately 95% to about 5% by weight of a cosmetic substance;
the monomers of said cross-linked copolymer and said cosmetic substance being polymerized in situ; and
said cosmetic substance being entrapped and dispersed throughout and within said polymer lattice, said cosmetic substance comprising at least one emollient or moisturizer selected from the group consisting of:
a straight, branched or cyclic hydroxyl alcohol containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
a straight, branched or cyclic carboxylic acid containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
an acid ester containing C1 to CH30 carboxylic acid esterified with a C1 to C30 hydroxyl alcohol;
a hydroxyl alcohol ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
a carboxylic acid ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms;
an alkane of the formula H--(CH2)n --H wherein n is 5 to 30 lanolin and its derivatives and a siloxane selected from the group consisting of hexamethyl disiloxane, cyclic polydimethyl siloxane, linear polydimethyl siloxane, poly phenylmethyl siloxane and polytrimethyl siloxane.
15. The .[.lattice-entrapped.]. composition as claimed in claim 14 wherein said emollient and/or moisturizer are releasable from entrapment by pressure or extraction.
16. The .[.lattice-entrapped.]. composition as claimed in claim 14 wherein said emollient and/or moisturizer are releasable from entrapment by diffusion as a result of temperature and humidity changes. .Iadd.
17. In a cosmetic or toiletry composition selected from the group consisting of pressed powders, toilet soaps, body powders, and antiperspirant sticks, containing an emollient or moisturizer, the improvement which comprises a solid, lattice-entrapped emollient or moisturizer composition comprising: from approximately 5% to approximately 95% by weight of a cross-linked syneresis-free hydrophobic polymer lattice; from approximately 95% to about 5% by weight of an emollient or moisturizer; the monomers of said cross-linked copolymer and said emollient or moisturizer being polymerized in situ; and said emollient or moisturizer being dispersed uniformly throughout and entrapped within said polymer lattice. .Iaddend.
Description
RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 246,663, filed Mar. 23, 1981, entitled "Polymer Entrapped Emollient-Moisturizer Composition", now abandoned.

BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to solid emollient-moisturizer compositions, and in particular relates to compositions wherein an emollient-moisturizer is entrapped in the lattice of a cross-linked polymer during in situ polymerization of the monomers forming the polymer lattice.

The art is replete with attempts to render functional materials such as emollient-moisturizers amenable to release on demand through encapsulation. Encapsulation confines materials in discrete units or capsules as the result of coating particles of the material with an encapsulant. The coating wall or encapsulating material used in encapsulation includes natural or synthetic polymers which permit release of the functional material by fracture, degradation or diffusion.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel form of entrappment of the functional material which does not encapsulate the functional material.

This invention provides a unique combination of polymers and functional materials, which results in compositions wherein the functional materials rather than being encapsulated by coating materials are dispensed throughout and entrapped within a polymeric lattice. These compositions are useful for incorporating a variety of functional materials, particularly emollients and moisturizers, into a variety of products such as cosmetics and healthcare products. Furthermore, the amount of functional materials which can be entrapped in the lattice are much higher than heretofore achievable by encapsulation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A better understanding of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of the invention taken in conjunction with the formal drawings, wherein:

FIGS. 1A-1D are photomicrographs at increasing powers of magnification of an emollient ester entrapped in a polymer lattice.

FIGS. 2A-2D show the visual effect at various degrees of magnification of a lattice-entrapped functional material product when it is applied in a thin layer.

FIGS. 3A-3D are photomicrographs of lattice-entrapped functional material products wherein the functional material is a fragrance which is homogeneously misable with the polymer.

FIGS. 4A-4C are photomicrographs of a lattice-entrapped emollient; a lattice wherein the emollient has been extracted, and a polymer which is formed without functional material in the polymer lattice.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a solid, lattice-entrapped emollient-moisturizer composition which comprises from about 5% to about 95% by weight of a cross-linked polymer lattice and from about 95% to about 5% by weight of an emollient-moisturizer selected from the group consisting of a straight, branched or cyclic alcohol containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms, a straight, branched or cyclic carboxylic acid containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms, an acid ester containing a C1 to C30 carboxylic acid esterified with a C1 to C30 hydroxyl alcohol, a hydroxyl alcohol ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms, a carboxylic acid ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms, and an alkane of the formula H--(CH2)n --H wherein n is an integer of from about 5 to about 30, and a siloxane. Unlike known methods of entrapping the emollient-moisturizer by encapsulating the emollient-moisturizer, the present invention entraps the emollient-moisturizer directly within the polymer lattice during in situ polymerization of the monomers.

It has now been discovered that a wide variety of materials commonly referred to as emollients or moisturizers which are either liquids or solids can be converted to free-flowing powders or beads by entrapment of the materials in a hydrophobic polymeric lattice. The entrapped materials are not themselves encapsulated in any way, i.e. enclosed by capsules, coatings or sacs; rather, they are dispersed throughout and entrapped within the polymeric lattice. Such lattice-entrapped products have properties that are superior to the encapsulated products of the prior art. The polymer lattice functions to hold and protect the entrapped material without encapsulating it, probably through sorption or swelling, and the lattice is capable of making the material available by a variety of mechanisms including pressure, diffusion and extraction. Significantly, when the lattice-entrapped materials of this invention are incorporated into cosmetic and toiletry products the polymeric lattice itself contributes beneficial effects to the product structure.

While this invention relates primarily to in situ lattice entrapment of emollient-moisturizers within the polymeric lattice, those skilled in the art will recognize that a wide variety of functional materials can be entrapped within the polymeric lattice. The invention contemplates that a wide variety of water insoluble organic liquids and solids may be incorporated within the lattice. In face, any functional material which will not chemically react with the polymer system comprising the polymeric lattice can be entrapped with the polymeric lattice.

The application will discuss the invention as it relates specifically to emollient-moisturizer lattice-entrapped products. The terms "emollient" and "moisturizer" include materials having properties defined for those terms in the text and articles:

M. G. de Navarre, The Chemistry and Manufacture of Cosmetics, Vol. 3, 2nd Ed. 1975, Chapter 9.

"Moisturization; A Systematic Approach"--L. J. Murphy Cosmetics and Toiletries, Vol. 93 (March, 1978) p. 31.

"Mineral Oil and Petrolatum; Reliable Moisturizers" by F. Tranner and G. Berube--Cosmetics and Toiletries, Vol. 93, (March, 1978) p. 81.

The solid lattice-entrapped i.e., nonencapsulated, emollient-moisturizer compositions of this invention are prepared by combining in one step a functional crosslinking monomer, a monofunctional monomer and the functional material to be entrapped within the lattice under such conditions as to thereafter initiate polymerization. As used herein, the term "functional crosslinking monomer" is meant to include di- or polyfunctional monomers having two or more polymerizable double bonds, while the term "monofunctional monomer" is meant to include a polymerizable monomer having one double bond. Functional crosslinking monomers useful in the invention may be a polyunsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of a mono- or diester of an alcohol and an alpha-beta unsaturated carboxylic acid; polyunsaturated polyvinyl ether of a polyhydroxy alcohol; mono- or poly unsaturated amides and cycloaliphatic esters of alpha-beta unsaturated carboxylic acids. Examples of such functional cross-linking monomers include polyethylene glycols having a molecular weight up to about 5000 dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate and trimethylol propane ethoxylated triacrylate, available under the trademark CHEMLINK 176, ditrimethylol propane dimethacrylate; propylene, dipropylene and higher propylen glycols having a molecular weight up to about 5000 including polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,3 butylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4 butanediol dimethacrylate, 1,6 hexanediol dimethacrylate, neopentyl glycol dimethacrylate, pentaerythritol dimethacrylate, dipentaerythritol dimethacrylate, bisphenol A dimethacrylate, divinyl (trivinyl) benzene, divinyl (trivinyl) toluene, triallyl maleate, triallyl phosphate, diallyl maleate, diallyl itaconate, and allyl methacrylate.

The monofunctional monomer of the novel polymeric system of this invention includes hydrophobic and hydrophilic monounsaturated monomers. The monomers include alkyl methacrylates and acrylates having straight or branched chain alkyl groups with 1 to 30 carbon atoms, preferably 5 to 18 carbon atoms. Preferred monofunctional monomer include lauryl methacrylate, 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate, isodecylmethacrylate, stearyl methacrylate, hydroxy ethyl methacrylate, hydroxy propyl methacrylate, diacetone acrylamide, phenoxy ethyl methacrylate, tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate and methoxy ethyl methacrylate.

The functional materials to be lattice-entrapped within the novel polymeric lattice of this invention are selected from materials commonly referred to as emollients and moisturizers, materials which are normally either liquids or solids. Functional materials such as perfumes, fragrances and flavors may be combined with emollient-moisturizers and lattice-entrapped within the novel polymeric lattice of this invention as well. Examples of emollients and moisturizers whicy may be lattice-entrapped within the polymeric lattice of this invention include straight, branched or cyclic hydroxy compounds such as alcohols containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms; straight, branched, or cyclic carboxylic acids containing 1 to 31 carbon atoms; acid esters containing C1 to C30 carboxylic acids esterified with C1 to C30 alcohols; alcohol ether containing 1 to 30 carbon atoms; alkanes of the formula H--(CH2)n--H, wherein n is 5 to 30; and siloxanes. Examples of such functional materials include 2-ethylhexyl oxystearate available commercially as WICKENOL 171; arachidyl propionate available commercially as WAXENOL 801; 2-ethylhexyl adipate available commercially as WICKENOL 158; isopropyl myristate available commercially as WICKENOL 101; ethanol; stearyl alcohol; propylene glycol; propionic acid; stearic acid; polyoxypropylene cetyl alcohol, available commercially as WICKENOL 707; polyoxypropylene lanolin alcohol available commercially as WICKENOL 727; Carbowax 300; petroleum jelly; mineral oil; aliphatic hydrocarbons such as mineral spirits; lanolin and lanolin derivatives such as acetylated lanolin and isopropyl lanolate; hexamethyl disiloxane, available commercially as DOW Q2-1096; cyclic polydimethyl siloxane, available commercially as DOW 344 and 345; and linear polydimethyl siloxane, available commercially as DOW 200; poly phenyl methyl siloxane, available commercially as DOW 556; and poly dimethyl/trimethyl siloxane. Other phenyl, ethyl and vinyl substituted polysilanes may also be included in the products of this invention.

The crosslinking monomer, monofunctional monomer and functional material are combined in a ratio such that the resultant novel lattice-entrapped composition of this invention comprises from about 5% to about 95% by weight of a cross-linked polymer lattice and from about 95% to about 5% by weight of the entrapped functional material. The ratio of crosslinking monomer to monofunctional monomer in the cross-linked polymer lattice can vary within the range of 99:1 to 1:99. While not restricting the invention to any precise composition, in a typical product of this invention, the crosslinking monomer, monofunctional monomer and functional material are combined in a ratio such that the resultant novel cross-linked polymer lattice comprises from about 60 to about 80% by weight of the functional monomer entrapped therein.

The cross-linked polymer lattice containing the entrapped functional material results from the in situ polymerization of the monomer mixture which already has the functional material to be entrapped dissolved therein. Generally, this results simply from mixing the crosslinking monomer and the monofunctional monomer, dissolving the functional material in the combined monomers to form a uniform mixture, and thereafter inducing polymerization. Polymerization may be induced by conventional initiators such as peroxides and the like, or by irridiation or redox systems. Polymerization usually occurs as temperatures between about 0 to 120 C., preferably about 80 C. The time and temperature of polymerization may be varied in accordance with the nature of the functional material, its concentration, and the attributes of the desired entrapped system, but in all instances, the polymerization occurs only after the monomers and the functional material are combined.

The physical properties of the lattice-entrapped functional materials may be influenced by several factors such as the precise combination of crosslinking monomer and monofunctional monomer selected, the ratio in which these two components are combined with one another and with the functional material. Accordingly, the lattice-entrapped materials of this invention which exist in the form of discrete, free-flowing powders or beads may be hard and have the ability to withstand rather substantial shearing, or the powders or beads may be soft, in which form they disintegrate or spread to form a uniform layer with minimal pressure. In general, the greater the ratio of cross-linked polymer lattice to the functional material, the harder the lattice-entrapped material. The lattice-entrapped functional material range in particle size from about 0.001 millimeters to about 3 millimeters.

A simple test has been developed to predict with reasonable accuracy whether or not a particular combination of crosslinking monomer, monofunctional monomer and functional material will polymerize to form the lattice-entrapped functional material of this invention. According to this test, approximately equal quantities of crosslinking monomer, monofunctional monomer and functional material are combined in a test tube and polymerized. If the resultant polymerized product is turbid or cloudy, a heterogenious macroporous structure has formed which is a positive indication that the components tested can be combined in a ratio such that subsequent polymerization will result in the products of this invention. There are exceptions to this rule, in that certain combinations of materials may result in the production of a clear polymer. If, however, when the clear polymer is extracted from the reaction mixture it is determined to be cloudy or turbid, indicating a heterogeneous, macroporous structure, a positive test has again occurred. After a positive test, i.e., an initial turbid or cloudy appearance on polymerization of the test tube size sample, further tests are conducted by varying the ratio of monomers to functional material to determine those ranges in which discrete particles, and not clumps or masses, are obtained on polymerization. With the foregoing test in mind, and recognizing the need to obtain discrete particles and not clumped or massed polymers, it will be appreciated that those skilled in the art can select appropriate cross-linking monomer, monofunctional monomers and the ratio in which these materials are to be combined to obtain the lattice-entrapped materials of this invention.

The novel lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention are versatile products having application in many and varied types of products. As stated previously, liquid and solid emollients and moisturizers form lattice-entrapped products which are suitable for incorporation in a wide variety of cosmetic, beauty and healthcared products. Insecticides, disinfectants, sun screens, flavors, pigments and perfumes may also be used as functional materials in the lattice-entrapped materials of this invention.

A primary advantage of formation of the novel lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention is the conversion of liquid or solid emollients and moisturizers into powdery, free-flowing materials through incorporation in a syneresis-free hydrophobic polymeric lattice. The lattice entrapment of the functional material provides the ability to hold the functional materials for controlled application on demand. Other advantages of the lattice-entrapping the functional materials of this invention include the ability to convert the solid and liquid functional materials into free-flowing discrete particles ranging in size from fine powders to rather large beads. Still another advantage of this invention lies in the fact that the polymer lattice itself contributes desirable attributes (discussed hereinafter) when the functional materials are entrapped therein in the preparation of cosmetics and toiletries.

The lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention are easy to handle, convenient to store, and are prepared by relatively non-complex procedures. Lattice-entrapment of the functional materials within the cross-linked polymer lattice protects the functional materials from the environment, excessive volatilization, and from ultraviolet light. The lattice-entrapped functional materials are releasable from their entrapped state within the microscopic lattice by the application of pressure, by extraction and diffuse from the entrapped state due to temperature and humidity changes. Also, it has been found that the desirable characteristics of the lattice-entrapped functional materials, i.e. emollients and moisturizers, are enhanced by the polymer lattice itself. The polymer lattice provides a continuous film when applied to the skin, so that the ultimate effect of the lattice-encapsulation of this invention is to extend the emollient-moisturizer effect of the lattice-entrapped materials.

A decided advantage to be obtained by entrapping the functional materials according to this invention results from being able to incorporate substantially greater amounts of functional material in a desired product than is possible through incorporation of the raw functional material without lattice entrappment. For example, it is known that an emollient such as 2 ethyl hexyl oxystearate (WICKENOL 171) provides improved moisturizing and skin softening qualities to toilet soap, but it is not possible to incorporate more than about 2-5% of such an emollient in conventional toilet soap formulations without seriously detracting from the foaming characteristics of the soap. If, however, the emollient is first formulated in the lattice-entrapped microscopic polymeric lattice of this invention, substantially higher concentrations of the emollient, up to as much as 20% by weight thereof, may be incorporated into the toilet soap formulation, thereby serving to enhance the softing and moisturizing properties of the soap without any deleterious effect on the foaming and esthetic properties of the soap. The polymer portion of the lattice also improves the mechanical properties of the soap.

Another important application for the novel lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention is in the area of molded wax and/or oil base sticks of the type typically used for antiperspirants, deodorants, lipsticks, sun screens, insect repellents and colognes. Typically, these stick-type products must balance many ingredients in order to obtain the desired appearance and function, but the optimal solid wax-oil base stick seems to elude cosmetic formulators because of problems such as shrinkage, variable rate of deposition on the skin, tackiness, and the like, which continue to plague such products. The lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention offer significant advantages to such stick-type products since they make it possible to substantially reduce the bodying agents (such as natural, vegetable or insect waxes) typically present in such stick products. These advantages result from the fact that the polymeric lattice which entraps the functional material enhances rigidity and strength of the stick while it permits the lattice-entrapped functional materials to produce their desired effect at they are made available from their lattice-entrapped state.

The lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention are free flowing powders which are easy to handle and convenient to store. The lattice-entrapped functional materials are made available or released when applied to the skin either directly or as a component of a cosmetic or toiletry product. It is thought that when the entrapped functional material is applied to the body in a cosmetic or toiletry product it is released as the result of rubbing and spreading in the form of a continuous uniform film protected within a hydrophobic envelope.

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was undertaken to better understood how the functional materials are entrapped in the polymer lattice. An objective of the study was to determine how miscible and immiscible functional materials differ in the manner in which they are incorporated into the polymer lattice. Additionally, the investigation showed a comparison of the lattice-entrapped product before and after a simulated application.

FIGS. 1A-1D are photomicrographs of 2-ethyl hexyl oxystearate/polymer powder (POLYTRAP 171) entrapped in a polymer powder. The photomicrographs were taken at X20 (FIG. 1A), X360 (FIG. 1B), X940 (FIG. 1C), and X3000 (FIG. 1D) power. The photographs indicate that emollient ester is heterogeneously adsorbed on the surface of a very fine polymer microdispersion (cluster) of less than two microns in diameter. In the higher power magnifications, it can be seen that rather than being encapsulated by the polymer, the functional material is entrapped within the polymer lattice.

FIGS. 2A-2D show examples of a lattice-entrapped functional material product when the product is applied and spread out, such as when it is applied directly to the skin. In this series of photographs, the material is again POLYTRAP 171. FIG. 2A is an untouched photograph of the lattice-entrapped product. FIG. 2B (at X1000) shows the lattice-entrapped film material product after it has been lightly spread. FIG. 2C (at X1000) shows the lattice-entrapped film material product after it has been completely spread and further shows that a continuous film material results. FIG. 2D (at X15,000) shows a more magnified view of the same product material as FIG. 2C. It can be seen from FIG. 2D that the film consists of small (less than 2 microns) particles.

FIGS. 3A-3D are photomicrographs of the lattice-entrapped functional material product which show the incorporation of a fragrance as the lattice-entrapped functional material. Herein, the fragrance is in the form of POLYTRAP Fragrance Polymer Beads. The various photographs are taken at increasing powers of magnification, X540 (FIG. 3A), X2000 (FIG. 3B), X3000 (FIG. 3C), and X10,000 (FIG. 3D). The fragrance is homogeneously miscible with the polymer, and is therefore very evenly dispersed within the polymer lattice. This can be readily seen by comparing FIG. 3C taken at X3,000 with the FIG. 1D which is a picture taken at the same magnification, but with the immiscible functional material in the polymer lattice. When the fragrance is homogeneously miscible with the polymer, it can be seen that an almost featureless smooth surface is created.

FIG. 4A shows a lattice-entrapped functional material product according to the present invention (POLYTRAP 171) at a power of X3,000. The same product is shown in FIG. 4B; however, the lattice-entrapped emollient has been extracted therefrom. FIG. 4C is a product formed without a functional material (POLYTRAP 235) and consits simply of the blank polymer beads. FIGS. 4B and 4C are very similar.

These various scanning electron microscopy studies of the lattice-entrappment system of the invention show the effect of an entrapped species on the physical characteristics of the polymer formation. Moreover, the photographs indicate that the functional material is entrapped within the polymer lattice rather than being encapsulated by the polymer. When the functional material is miscible (e.g. fragrance) in the polymer, a homogeneous polymer lattice is formed which produces mechanically tough spheres or beads which can be milled without disturbing the integrity of the structure. When the material is a non-solvent for the polymer, a heterogeneous internal structure is formed.

The cluster of beads formed by either the miscible or immiscible functional material is fragile and when mechanical stress is applied thereto, the clusters will fracture and produce a continuous film of particle sizes less than two microns, even in the range approaching 0.1-0.2 microns.

While it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that there are many variations in procedure and components, this invention may be illustrated by the following examples:

EXAMPLE 1

7 grams of 2 ethylhexyl oxystearate (WICKENOL 171) was mixed with 1.5 grams of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 1.5 grams of lauryl methacrylate in a glass test tube. The solution was deaerated for five (5) minutes and 0.1 ml of t-butyl peroctoate was added and mixed while heating to 80 C. in an oil bath. After 20 minutes, the contents solidified; and the mixture was maintained at about 80 C. for an additional hour to assure full polymerization. A semi-soft, heterogeneous white opaque polymer mass resulted containing the entrapped ester.

The following examples demonstrate initial screening of the crosslinking monomer, monofunctional monomer and functional material to determine whether or not the combination thereof will form the novel lattice-entrapped products of the invention. In each test the components were combined in a test tube and polymerization initiated and completed. Formulation of an opaque polymer mass in the test tube scale test indicated that the components could be combined in large scale polymerization to form the entrapped functional materials of this invention.

EXAMPLE 2

Following the procedure of Example 1, the crosslinking monomers tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylol-propane trimethylacrylate, trimethylol-propane ethoxy triacrylate, and allyl methacrylate were polymerized in the presence of 70% by weight 2-ethylhexyl oxystearate and 15% by weight lauryl methacrylate. In each case a semi-soft, white opaque polymer mass resulted, indicating suitability for formation of the lattice-entrapped product of this invention.

EXAMPLE 3

Following the procedure of Example 1, test tube polymerization was completed varying the types of monomer constituents and their ratios, and the quantity and type of functional material to be entrapped. In each instance, t-butyl peroctoate was used to initiate polymerization at a constant level of 3% by weight, based on the weight of the combined content of monomers and functional material. The components, quantity and test tube results are set forth in Table 1. The following abbreviations are used in Table 1:

______________________________________TEGDM     Tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylateTMPTM     Trimethyl propane trimethacrylateEGDM      Ethylene glycol dimethacrylateTPETM     Trimethyiol propane ethoxylate trimethacrylateLMA       Lauryl methacrylateIMA       Isodecyl methacrylateHMA       Hydroxyethyl methacrylateDAA       Diacetone acrylamidePMA       Phenoxyethyl methacrylateMEMA      Methoxy ethyl methacrylate______________________________________

                                  TABLE I__________________________________________________________________________   Cross-    MonoTest   Linking    Weight        Functional              Weight                  Material   Weight                                 AppearanceNo.   Monomer    %   Monomer              %   Entrapped  %   in Test Tube__________________________________________________________________________ 1 TEGDM 67.5        LMA   22.5                  2 Ethylhexyl                             10  Hard-powdery,                  stearate       white opaque                  (WICKENOL  171)                                 polymer mass 2 TMPTM 45  IMA   45  Arachidyl pro-                             10  Semi-hard,                  pionate        off-white                  (WAXENOL  801)                                 opaque 3 TMPTM 12  IMA   3   Arachidyl pro-                             85  Semi-soft,                  pionate        off-white                  (WAXENOL  801)                                 opaque 4 EGDM  18.7        SMA   6.3 Di(Ethylhexyl)                             75  Semi-soft,                  adipate        white opaque                  (WAXENOL  158) 5 EGDM  30  HMA   10.3                  Isopropyl  60  Semi-soft,                  Myristate      white opaque                  (WICKENOL  101) 6 EGDM  30  LMA   10  Ethanol    60  Hard-powdery,                                 white opaque 7 TEGDM 67.5        SMA   22.5                  Stearyl alcohol                             10  Very hard,                                 white opaque25 EGDM  45  LMA   45  Mineral    10  Hard powdery, white                  spirits        opaque26 EGDM  18.8        LMA   6.2 Mineral    75  Semi-hard, white                  spirits        opaque27 TEGDM 12.5        LMA   12.5                  Lanolin    75  Semi-soft, yellow                                 opaque28 EGDM  60  SMA   30  Poly-Hexa- 10  Very hard, white                  methyl         opaque                  disiloxane29 EGDM  15  SMA   5   (Dow  Q2-1096)                             80  Hard, powdery, white                                 opaque30 EGDM  60  LMA   30  Poly       10  Hard, powdery, white                  dimethyl       opaque                  (cyclic)                  siloxane31 EGDM  22.5        LMA   7.5 (Dow  344 & 345)                             70  Hard, powdery, white                                 opaque32 EGDM  45  DAA   45  Poly       10  Very hard, white opaque                  Dimethyl(Lin-)                  ear) Siloxane33 EGDM  10  DAA   10  (Dow  200)                             80  Semi-hard, white opaque17 EGDM  60  DAA   30  Polyoxy propylene                             10  Very hard,                  (30 moles lanolin)                                 white opaque18 EGDM  15  DAA   5   (WICKENOL  727)                             80  Semi-soft,                                 yellowish,                                 opaque19 TEGDM 67.5        LMA   22.5                  Carbowax  300                             10  Hard and clear20 TEGDM 13  LMA   7              80  Semi-soft,                                 white opaque21 TPETM 54  PMA   36  Mineral oil                             10  Hard-powdery,                                 white opaque22 TPETM 15  PMA   15  Mineral oil                             70  Semi-soft,                                 white opaque23 TMPTM 45  MEMA  45  Petroleum jelly                             10  Semi-soft,                                 white opaque24 TMPTM 15  MEMA  5   Petroleum jelly                             80  Semi-soft,                                 white opaque 8 TEGDM 15  SMA   5   Stearyl    80  Hard-powdery                  alcohol        white opaque 9 EGDM  67.5        DAA   22.5                  Propylene  10  Very hard, off-                  glycol         white opaque10 EGDM  15  DAA   5   Propylene  80  Semi-soft, off-                  glycol         white opaque11 EGDM  60  LMA   30  Propionic  10  Very hard,                  acid           white opaque12 EGDM  15  LMA   5   Propionic  80  Semi-hard,                  acid           white opaque13 TEGDM 45  SMA   45  Stearic    10  Very hard, white                  acid           opaque14 TEGDM 10  SMA   10  Stearic    80  Semi-hard white                  acid           opaque15 EGDM  67.5        SMA   22.5                  Polyoxy propyl-                             10  Very hard, white                  ene (30 moles) opaque16 EGDM  15  SMA   5   cetyl alcohol                             80  Semi-soft, white                  (WICKENOL  707)                                 opaque__________________________________________________________________________

The following examples demonstrate formation of the lattice-entrapped materials of this invention.

EXAMPLE 4

1.20 grams of polyvinyl pyrrolidone having a K value of about 80 to 100 and available from Dan River, Inc., was dissolved in 1500 ml of water in a 2000 ml three necked resin flask equipped with a stirrer, thermometer and nitrogen purge. A solution of 335 grams of 2 ethylhexyl oxystearate (WICKENOL 171), 132 grams ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 33 grams 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate and 5 ml t-butyl peroctoate was bubbled with nitrogen for 5 minutes. The resultant monomer mix was slowly added to the stirred aqueous solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone at 22 C. under nitrogen. The temperature was raised to 80 C. with constant agitation and held until polymerization started in approximately 15 minutes, and maintained at 80 C. for an additional 2 hours to complete the reaction. Semi-soft, white opaque beads were collected by filtering off the supernatant liquid and dried to remove any excess water. The beads weighed 450 g for a yield of 90%, and were 0.25 to 0.5 mm in diameter. Other protective colloids such as starch, polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose, methyl cellulose, or inorganic system such as divalent alkali metal hydroxides, for example MgOH, may be used in place of the polyvinyl pyrrolidone suspending medium.

EXAMPLE 5

The procedure of Example 4 was repeated except that in each case 337.5 g arachidyl propionate (WAXENOL 801), or 337.5 g mineral oil, or 350 g cyclic polydimethyl siloxane (DOW 345), or 350 g petroleum distillate (150 to 160 C. boiling point), or 325 g petroleum jelly, or 350 g isopropyl isostearate (WICKENOL 131) or 375 g. Di(2 ethylhexyl) adipate (WICKENOL 158), were substituted for 2-ethylhexyl oxystearate. In each case, semi-soft, white opaque beads were collected in good yield. These beads may be incorporated into cosmetic or toiletry products where they domonstrate their desired effect by making the lattice-entrapped emollient-moisturizer available for application to the skin. The particle size of the resultant bead in each case was between 0.25 to 0.5 mm in diameter. The precise particle size varied somewhat due to the degree and rate of agitation during polymerization and the rates of the components to the water in which the polymerization system was suspended.

The following examples demonstrate cosmetic or toiletry compositions in which the lattice-entrapped functional materials of this invention have been incorporated.

EXAMPLE 6

______________________________________Translucent Pressed Powder______________________________________Talc              77.64Kaolin            14.0075% Arachidyl-    5.00propionate en-trapped bead ofExample 5Magnesium carbonate             2.00Colorants         0.31Methyl paraben    0.10Propyl paraben    0.10Germail 115       0.10Fragrance         0.75             100.00______________________________________

The components were combined in accordance with conventional formulation techniques. The lattice-entrapped emollients (Example 5 product) provided a pressed powder with desired emollient properties and application of the product to the body made the emollient available by rubbing. The pressed powder was remarkably resistant to breakage crumbling and glazing.

EXAMPLE 7

______________________________________Milled Toilet Soap______________________________________Toilet soap base of tallow                89.00and coconut12-ethylhexyl oxystearate                10.00entrapped bead of Example 4Fragrance            1.00                100.00______________________________________ 1 Duveen Soap Corporation, 154 Morgan Avenue, Brooklyn, New York

The components were combined in accordance with conventional formulation techniques. The lattice-entrapped emollient (Example 4) provided the soap with the desired emollient properties. In addition, the physical attributes of the soap were enhanced, rendering it more resistant to cracking in use and less brittle. The soap had excellent lathering properties.

EXAMPLE 8

______________________________________Body Powder______________________________________Talc             84.5Fragrance        0.52-ethylhexyl oxy-            10.0stearate entrappedbead of Example 4Syloid #74       5.0            100.00______________________________________

The components were combined in accordance with conventional formulation techniques. The lattice-entrapped emollient (Example 4) provided the body powder with the desired emollient properties. In addition, the physical properties of the body powder were enhanced by providing increased adhesion to the body.

EXAMPLE 9

______________________________________Antiperspirant Stick______________________________________Phase AStearyl Alcohol      25.0Synthetic Beeswax Flakesa                10.0WAXENOL  821Myristyl Myristatea                25.0WAXENOL  810Propylene Glycol Stearate                25.0Phase BAluminum chlorhydratea                25.0WICKENOL  CPS 325Phase C2-Ethylhexyl oxystearate en-                5.0trapped bead of Example 4Di-octyl adipate entrapped                5.00bead of Example 5                100.00______________________________________ a Wickham Products, Inc., Hugenmot, New York 12746

The antiperspirant stick formulations were prepared by heating the components of Phase A to 65-70 C. until melted, adding the component of Phase B without further heating and with constant and continuous agitation followed by slow addition of the components of Phase C with constant agitation until a uniform mixture is obtained. The mixture was then cooled somewhat and poured into molds at temperatures of from about 50 to 55 C. The antiperspirant stick had enhanced rigidity and strength and the desired emollient properties without tackiness.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification424/480, 424/65, 424/69, 510/142, 424/60, 510/152, 424/DIG.5, 424/64, 424/63, 424/59, 424/DIG.10, 510/441, 424/68
International ClassificationA61Q15/00, A61K8/92, A61K8/86, A61Q13/00, A61K8/81, A61K8/37, A61K8/36, A61Q19/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61K8/362, A61Q13/00, A61K8/86, A61Q15/00, A61K2800/56, A61K8/36, A61K8/925, A61Q19/10, A61K8/37, A61K8/8152, A61K8/361
European ClassificationA61K8/86, A61K8/36C, A61K8/36, A61Q13/00, A61Q15/00, A61K8/81K4, A61K8/37, A61Q19/10, A61K8/92F, A61K8/362
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