Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE34794 E
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/010,022
Publication dateNov 22, 1994
Filing dateJan 28, 1993
Priority dateNov 6, 1989
Also published asEP0427151A2, EP0427151A3, US4967262
Publication number010022, 08010022, US RE34794 E, US RE34794E, US-E-RE34794, USRE34794 E, USRE34794E
InventorsWarren M. Farnworth
Original AssigneeMicron Technology, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gull-wing zig-zag inline lead package having end-of-package anchoring pins
US RE34794 E
Abstract
A semiconductor package having a gull-wing, zig-zag, inline-lead configuration and end-of-package anchoring devices for rigidly affixing the package to a circuit board such that each lead is in compressibe contact with its associated mounting pad on the board. The anchoring devices of a first embodiment comprise anchoring pins having fish-hook-type barbs which lock against the under side of the board when the pegs are inserted through holes in the board; a second embodiment utilizes anchoring pins which are adhesively bonded in recesses that have been drilled or molded into the board; a third embodiment utilizes anchoring pins, the ends of which can be bonded directly to planar peg-bonding regions on the surface of the board; and a fourth utilizes tapered anchoring ping which may be inserted with an interference fit into holes in the board. The invention eliminates the need for mechanical support of the packages during solder reflow operations used during board assembly and repair.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(15)
I claim:
1. A vertically-oriented semiconductor package designed for surface mounting on one .Iadd.of a .Iaddend.pair of planar surfaces of a printed circuit board, said package comprising:
a body having a pair of substantially parallel, vertical planar sides, lower and upper horizontal edges and a substantially vertical edge at each end of the package;
a semiconductor die having a face on which integrated circuitry is constructed, said die being encapsulated within said body such that said face is positioned between and substantially parallel to the vertical planar sides of said body;
a plurality of .Iadd.gull-wing, zig-zag .Iaddend.inline leads, each of which is electrically connected, within said body, to a portion of the circuitry on said die, and each of which extends in a downward direction through the lower edge of said body, below which it is bent such that it is resiliently biased against the planar surface of the circuit board when the package is in a mounted position thereupon;
at least one downward-facing anchoring pin integral with said body at each end thereof; and
means for securely attaching each anchoring pin to the circuit board in order to maintain a mounted position thereupon during solder reflow operations.
2. The semiconductor package of claim 1, wherein said means for securely attaching comprises a barb on the end of each anchoring pin which, when said anchoring pins are inserted from said one surface through properly sized and aligned holes in said circuit board, hooks on the other surface of said circuit board.
3. The semiconductor package of claim 2, wherein each of said anchoring pins has a shoulder that is larger than the diameter of the holes in said circuit board which seats against said one planar surface of said circuit board.
4. The semiconductor package of claim 3, wherein said anchoring pins are molded with an .[.outwardlyfacing.]. .Iadd.outwardly-facing .Iaddend.bevel and with inwardly-facing barbs.
5. The semiconductor package of claim 3, wherein said anchoring pins are molded with an .[.inwardlyfacing.]. .Iadd.inwardly-facing .Iaddend.bevel and with outwardly-facing barbs.
6. The semiconductor package of claim 1, wherein said means for securely attaching comprises a nub on the end of each anchoring pin which is anchored to a recess in said board with quick-setting adhesive.
7. The semiconductor package of claim 6, wherein each of said anchoring pins has a shoulder that is larger than the diameter of the recesses in said circuit board which seats against said one planar surface of said circuit board.
8. The semiconductor package of claim 1 wherein said means for securely attaching consists of bonding the end of each anchoring pin directly to the planar surface of said board with quick-setting adhesive.
9. The semiconductor package of claim 1, wherein said means for securely attaching comprises a tapered extension on the end of each anchoring pin which, when said anchoring pins are inserted from said one surface through holes in said circuit board that are properly aligned and properly sized for a forcedinsertion fit, said tapered extensions are frictionally locked in said holes.
10. The semiconductor package of claim 9, wherein each of said anchoring pins has a shoulder that is larger than the diameter of its corresponding hole in said circuit board, said shoulder seating against said one planar surface of said circuit board.
11. The semiconductor package of claim 10, wherein said tapered anchoring pin extensions are longer that the thickness of said circuit board.
12. A circuit board/semiconductor package assembly comprising a circuit board, a first gull-wing .[.ZIP.]. .Iadd.zig-zag inline lead .Iaddend.semiconductor package having a pair of anchoring pins molded with an inwardly-facing bevel and with outwardly-facing barbs, and a second gull-wing .[.ZIP.]. .Iadd.zig-zag inline lead .Iaddend.semiconductor package having a pair of anchoring pins molded with an outwardly-facing bevel and with inwardly-facing barbs, one anchoring pin of each of said first and second packages sharing a first anchoring hole in said board and the remaining pin of each of said first and second packages sharing a second anchoring hole in said board. .Iadd.
13. A semiconductor package, designed for surface mounting on one of a pair of planar surfaces of a printed circuit board, said package comprising:
a body having a pair of substantially parallel, vertical planar faces, lower and upper horizontal edges, and a substantially vertical edge at both ends thereof;
a semiconductor die having a face on which integrated circuitry is constructed, said die being encapsulated within said body such that said face is positioned between and substantially parallel to the vertical planar faces of said body; and
a plurality of inline leads, each of which is electrically connected, within said body, to a portion of the circuitry on said die, and each of which extends in a downward direction through the lower edge of said body such that when said package is mounted on said circuit board, said leads are in compressive contact with said planar surface; and
at least one downward-facing anchoring pin integral with said body at each end thereof;
said anchoring pin having a barb on the end thereof which, when said anchoring pin is inserted from said one surface through properly sized and aligned holes in said circuit board, hooks on the other surface of said circuit board. .Iaddend. .Iadd.14. The semiconductor package of claim 13, wherein each said anchoring pin has a shoulder that is larger than the diameter of the holes in said circuit board which seats against said one
planar surface of said circuit board. .Iaddend. .Iadd.15. The semiconductor package of claim 14, wherein said anchoring pins are molded with an outwardly-facing bevel and with inwardly-facing barbs. .Iaddend. .Iadd.16. The semiconductor package of claim 14, wherein said anchoring pins are molded with an inwardly-facing bevel and with outwardly-facing barbs. .Iaddend. .Iadd.17. A semiconductor package, designed for surface mounting on one of a pair of planar surfaces of a printed circuit board, said package comprising:
a body having a pair of substantially parallel, vertical planar faces, lower and upper horizontal edges, and a substantially vertical edge at both ends thereof;
a semiconductor die having a face on which integrated circuitry is constructed, said die being encapsulated within said body such that said face is positioned between and substantially parallel to the vertical planar faces of said body; and
a plurality of inline leads, each of which is electrically connected, within said body, to a portion of the circuitry on said die, and each of which extends in a downward direction through the lower edge of said body such that when said package is mounted on said circuit board, said leads are in compressive contact with said planar surface; and
at least one downward-facing anchoring pin integral with said body at each end thereof;
said anchoring pin having a nub on the end thereof which is non-frictionally anchored within an alignment recess in said board with
quick-setting adhesive. .Iaddend. .Iadd.18. A semiconductor package, designed for surface mounting on one of a pair of planar surfaces of a printed circuit board, said package comprising:
a body having a pair of substantially parallel, vertical planar faces, lower and upper horizontal edges, and a substantially vertical edge at both ends thereof;
a semiconductor die having a face on which integrated circuitry is constructed, said die being encapsulated within said body such that said face is positioned between and substantially parallel to the vertical planar faces of said body; and
a plurality of inline leads, each of which is electrically connected, within said body, to a portion of the circuitry on said die, and each of which extends in a downward direction through the lower edge of said body such that when said package is mounted on said circuit board, said leads are in compressive contact with said planar surface; and
at least one downward-facing anchoring pin integral with said body at each end thereof;
the end of said anchoring pin having a planar surface which is bondable directly to the planar surface of said board with quick-setting adhesive. .Iaddend.
Description

.Iadd.This application is a reissue of 07/432,598 filed Nov. 6, 1989 U.S. Pat. No. 4,967,262. .Iaddend.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to semiconductor packaging techniques, and, more specifically, to high-density, surface-mount devices.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Integrated semiconductor devices are typically constructed en masse on a wafer of silicon or gallium arsenide. Each device generally takes the form of an integrated circuit (IC) die. If the die is to be encapsulated in a plastic package, it is first bonded to the die-mounting paddle of a leadframe which is attached to other leadframes in a leadframe strip. The wire attachment pads on the die are connected with their corresponding leads on the leadframe with aluminum or gold wire during a wire bonding process, following which the die is coated with a protective polyimide film. Finally, the die is encapsulated in plastic and the plastic-encapsulated chip undergoes a trim and form operation which separates the interconnected packages on the leadframe strip into individual entities and bends (forms) the leads of each package. The package is then recognizable as an IC "chip". The operation for manufacturing plastic-encapsulated packages is highly automated, allowing high quality and low cost.

IC packages take many forms, although the trend is clearly toward designs which increase mounting density. For years, the standard IC package was the dual-inline package or DIP. Such packages were typically through-hole soldered on printed circuit boards. A newer dual-inline lead design, known as small-outline J-lead package, has been rapidly supplanting the standard DIP design for two reasons. Firstly, the leads of an SOJ package are soldered to only one side of a circuit board, thus leaving the other side of the board free for the mounting of additional SOJ packages. Secondly, the leads are much less vulnerable to damage prior to board assembly, hence, there are fewer rejects. Both DIP and SOJ packages are horizontal packages (i.e., the die is mounted in a plane parallel to the board-attachment plane). Vertical packages are also coming into greater use because they permit greater circuit board mounting density. Vertical packages have a very narrow horizontal cross section, with the die mounted between the vertical sides of the package, the distance between which is minimized. All leads exit through the lower edge of the package. The zig-zag inline package or ZIP is a typical vertical package. A vertical package known as the zig-zag inline package or ZIP is also coming into greater use. Existing ZIPs are designed for through- hole-soldered connections on a circuit board. Since such packages require very little board area for connection, they are particularly useful where high-density applications are a must. Although the use of a surface-mount ZIP has been suggested by Barbara Cole of Boise, Idaho's Micron Technology, Inc., the appeal of such a package is greatly diminished by the requirement that each package be maintained in a vertical position over its associated mounting pads until a solder reflow operation is performed.

What is needed is a new type of package which combines the density advantages of both the SOJ-type package with the vertical packaging of the ZIP, which can be positioned on a circuit board with currently available board-stuffing equipment and which will maintain its vertical position on the board without auxiliary package-support apparatuses until final attachment of the package to the circuit board during a solder reflow operation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention combines the density advantages of both the SOJ-type package and the ZIP in a package design which does not require auxiliary mechanical support prior to solder reflow. This has been accomplished by creating a package having gull-wing shaped leads in a zig-zag configuration. In addition, the package has an anchoring pin at each end which rigidly secures the package to a printed circuit board both before and after lead-to-board attachment via solder reflow. Several embodiments of the invention adapt themselves to various types of automatic board-stuffing equipment. The first embodiment utilizes anchoring pins having fish-hook-type barbs which lock against the under side of the circuit board when the positioning pins are inserted through holes in the board having roughly the same diameter as the pins. When the anchoring pins are seated in the board holes, each of the package's gull-wing-shaped leads is resiliently biased against its associated bonding pad on the board, thus assuring a solid electrical connection when the board and package assembly is solder reflowed. A first embodiment package is designed so that a similar package with anchoring pins having reverse-direction barbs can be mounted on the other side of the board using the same holes. A second embodiment of the invention utilizes anchoring pins which can be bonded using quick-setting adhesive to recesses that been drilled or molded into only one side of the circuit board. A third embodiment dispenses with holes and recesses in the board altogether and has anchoring pins, the ends of which can be bonded directly to planar pin bonding regions on a circuit board. The first and second embodiments have an advantage in that the anchoring pins afford a significant degree of protection to the gull-wing leads from mechanical damage. On the other hand, the third embodiment, while not providing the same degree of protection to the leads, does offer the advantage of not requiring a drilling step for creating mounting holes or mounting recesses on the circuit board.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal side elevational view of a first embodiment of the new gull-wing ZIP package having barbed anchoring pins mounted on a printed circuit board;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the first embodiment through broken line 2--2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3, is the same cross-sectional view as depicted in FIG. 2, with the exception that the package has been removed from the circuit board in order to show the gull-wing leads in an uncompressed state;

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal side elevational view of a pair of first embodiments of the new gull-wing ZIP package mounted within the same pair of holes on a printed circuit board, the upper package having barbed anchoring pins with outward-facing barbs and the lower package having anchoring pins with inwardfacing barbs;

FIG. 5 is a partial longitudinal side elevational view of a pair of second embodiments of the new gull-wing ZIP package having anchoring pins, said packages adhesively secured to opposite sides of a printed circuit board;

FIG. 6 is a partial longitudinal side elevational view of a pair of third embodiments of the new gull-wing ZIP package adhesively secured to opposite sides of a printed circuit board; and

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal side elevational view of a pair of fourth embodiments of the new gull-wing ZIP package mounted on opposite sides of a printed circuit board said fourth embodiments having tapered anchoring pins for interference fit mounting.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to FIG. 1, a first embodiment of the invention in the form of a gull-wing zig-zag inline package 11 having barbed anchoring pins 12 is shown mounted on a printed circuit board 13. Anchoring pins 12 are integral with the package's molded plastic body 14. A pair of round anchoring pin holes 15 have been drilled in circuit board 13. Anchoring pins 12 have a square-shouldered shank 16 that acts as a travel limiting device when pins 12 are inserted into holes 15. The lower portion 17 of positioning pins 12 is sized so that it may be inserted into holes 15. The gull-wing shaped leads 18 are resiliently biased against bonding pads 19 when anchoring pins 12 have been seated against their square shanks 16. Barbs 20 are shown as anchoring package 11 against the lower surface of printed circuit board 13. It will be noted that anchoring pins 12 extend below the level of gull-wing shaped leads 18, thus providing protection to the leads from mechanical damage.

Referring now to FIG. 2, which is a crosssectional view through the gull-wing zig-zag inline package 11 of FIG. 1, the gull-wing shape of leads 18 is readily discernable. Barb 20 is also readily visible in this view.

Referring now to FIG. 3, package 11 is shown detached from circuit board 13. The unanchoring of package 11 from circuit board 13 has been done so as to be able to see the shape of gull-wing leads 18 when they are not under compression against bonding pads 19.

Referring now to FIG. 4, a pair of first-embodiment devices are shown anchored to different sides of a printed circuit board 13 using a single pair of anchoring holes 15. It will be noted that the barbs 20 on the upper package 11 face outward, while the barbs 41 on lower package 42 face inward. Using the technique of opposite facing barbs in order to populate both sides of a printed circuit board, it is evident that two different molds are required for encapsulation when creating the package.

Referring now to FIG. 5, a pair .Iadd.of .Iaddend.identical second-embodiment gull-wing ZIP packages 51 are shown bonded to opposite sides of a printed circuit board. It will be noted that, in this case, anchoring pins 52 do not extend from one side of circuit board 53 to the other. Anchoring pins 52 of this particular embodiment have rectangular-cross-section shanks 53. Quick-setting cyano-acrylic adhesive is utilized to bond the cylindrical nubs 54 of anchoring pins 52 in the depressions 55 on board 53. .Iadd.In this embodiment, depressions 55 serve merely as alignment recesses, being incapable of providing vertical support to the packages 51 and maintain the leads 18 in a state of compression against the board bonding pads 19 without the use of an adhesive to anchor the nubs 54 within the depressions 55. .Iaddend.The advantage to this approach is that two different molds are not required to provide components to stuff both sides of a circuit board.

Referring now to FIG. 6, a pair of identical third-embodiment gull-wing ZIP packages 61 are shown anchored to opposite sides of a common printed circuit board 63. This embodiment does not require the drilling of anchoring pin holes in the printed circuit board. The third embodiment ZIP package 61 is virtually identical to the second embodiment version depicted in FIG. 5, with the exception that the cylindrical nubs 54 of anchoring pins 52 have been eliminated completely. The end sections 62 of packages 61 have a planar surfaces which are bonded directly to circuit board 63 with quick-setting adhesive. Adhesive displaced during the bonding process is represented by fillet 64.

Referring now to FIG. 7, a single fourth-embodiment gull-wing ZIP package 71 is shown mounted on a circuit board 72. The fourth embodiment ZIP package 71 is also virtually identical to the second embodiment version depicted in FIG. 5, with the exception that cylindrical nubs 54 of anchoring pins 52 have been replaced with tapered extensions 74. A pair of holes 75 have been drilled in circuit board 72. The holes are slightly larger in diameter than the tip of tapered extensions 74 to facilitate positioning of the package on the board with conventional automatic pick and place equipment. However, the hole diameter is smaller than the base of tapered extensions 74, such that when tapered extensions 74 are forced into the holes, friction will retain the gull-wing leads in a compressed state and the package itself in a stable upright position on circuit board 72 until a solder reflow can be effected. The rectangular-cross section shank 76 of anchoring pin 73 limits the insertion depth of tapered extensions 74 into circuit board 72.

Although only certain embodiments of the invention have been described herein, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention as claimed.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3056939 *Jul 26, 1960Oct 2, 1962Illinois Tool WorksComponent lead-locking arrangement
US3162721 *Jul 26, 1960Dec 22, 1964Illinois Tool WorksComponent lead-locking arrangement
US3524108 *Dec 26, 1967Aug 11, 1970Cts CorpBoard mounted modular circuit component and improvement therein
US3796921 *Jun 14, 1973Mar 12, 1974Fischer ArturLead supporting housing for electrical component
US4155615 *Jan 24, 1978May 22, 1979Amp IncorporatedMulti-contact connector for ceramic substrate packages and the like
US4611389 *Mar 18, 1985Sep 16, 1986Motorola, Inc.For the fabrication of a semiconductor device package
US4677458 *Nov 4, 1983Jun 30, 1987Control Data CorporationCeramic IC package attachment apparatus
US4698660 *Feb 12, 1986Oct 6, 1987Fujitsu LimitedResin-molded semiconductor device
US4736520 *May 26, 1987Apr 12, 1988Control Data CorporationProcess for assembling integrated circuit packages
US4967262 *Nov 6, 1989Oct 30, 1990Micron Technology, Inc.Gull-wing zig-zag inline lead package having end-of-package anchoring pins
US4975763 *Mar 14, 1988Dec 4, 1990Texas Instruments IncorporatedEdge-mounted, surface-mount package for semiconductor integrated circuit devices
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5619067 *May 2, 1994Apr 8, 1997Texas Instruments IncorporatedSemiconductor device package side-by-side stacking and mounting system
US5663105 *Jan 16, 1996Sep 2, 1997Texas Instruments IncorporatedSemiconductor device package side-by-side stacking and mounting system
US5728601 *May 15, 1995Mar 17, 1998Fujitsu LimitedProcess for manufacturing a single in-line package for surface mounting
US6198636 *Dec 15, 1999Mar 6, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device socket, assembly and methods
US6215183Feb 16, 2000Apr 10, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount assembly and methods
US6224936Oct 7, 1998May 1, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Method for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6228677Feb 16, 2000May 8, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount assembly and methods
US6232146May 19, 1999May 15, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including combed bond pad opening, assemblies and methods
US6235551Dec 31, 1997May 22, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads and methods
US6238228Feb 16, 2000May 29, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing semiconductor device to carrier substrate
US6239012Sep 28, 1999May 29, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable semiconductor device and methods
US6265773Oct 12, 1999Jul 24, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable and alignable semiconductor device, assembly, and methods
US6268655Sep 30, 1999Jul 31, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads and methods
US6295209Aug 30, 2000Sep 25, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including combed bond pad opening, assemblies and methods
US6302719Sep 21, 1999Oct 16, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing semiconductor device to carrier substrate
US6319065Jan 20, 2000Nov 20, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6326687 *Sep 1, 1998Dec 4, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.IC package with dual heat spreaders
US6330159Jun 28, 2000Dec 11, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount apparatus with thermal carrier
US6342731Dec 31, 1997Jan 29, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable semiconductor device, assembly, and methods
US6380630Aug 22, 2000Apr 30, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount package utilizing a back-to-back semiconductor device module
US6383839Apr 13, 2001May 7, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable semiconductor device and methods
US6398573 *Jul 20, 2001Jun 4, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing semiconductor device to carrier substrate
US6410406Sep 13, 2000Jun 25, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads and methods
US6414374May 22, 2001Jul 2, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads and methods
US6417024Sep 29, 1999Jul 9, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Back-to-back semiconductor device module, assemblies including the same and methods
US6418023Aug 30, 2001Jul 9, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount apparatus with thermal carrier
US6419517Feb 26, 1999Jul 16, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus and method for packaging circuits
US6442044Dec 7, 2000Aug 27, 2002Microntechnology, Inc.Semiconductor device socket, assembly and methods
US6453550Jan 13, 2000Sep 24, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Method for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6455351Mar 27, 2001Sep 24, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount assembly and methods
US6457985Jan 31, 2002Oct 1, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing semiconductor device to carrier substrate
US6478627Jun 7, 2001Nov 12, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6492728Apr 18, 2001Dec 10, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount assembly
US6507109Feb 11, 2002Jan 14, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount package utilizing a back-to-back semiconductor device module
US6512290Jun 4, 2001Jan 28, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable and alignable semiconductor device, assembly, and methods
US6518098Aug 29, 2001Feb 11, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.IC package with dual heat spreaders
US6527999Apr 13, 2001Mar 4, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Using clamping fixture constructed so a slight bow or curvature thereof can counter either a convex or concave bow or curvature of the printed circuit board
US6531764Aug 27, 2001Mar 11, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable semiconductor device, assembly, and methods
US6537100Jul 15, 2002Mar 25, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus and method for packaging circuits
US6565374Aug 13, 2002May 20, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing semiconductor device to carrier substrate
US6577503Jul 8, 2002Jun 10, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount apparatus with thermal carrier
US6592670May 24, 2000Jul 15, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6611058Mar 27, 2001Aug 26, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount assembly and methods
US6612872May 30, 2002Sep 2, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6634098Jul 20, 1999Oct 21, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Methods for assembling, modifying and manufacturing a vertical surface mount package
US6648663Apr 5, 2002Nov 18, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing semiconductor device to carrier substrate
US6676416 *May 11, 2000Jan 13, 2004Zyvex CorporationRibbon cable and electrical connector for use with microcomponents
US6751859Aug 16, 2002Jun 22, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6758696Mar 27, 2003Jul 6, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6760970Aug 13, 2002Jul 13, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US6764549Jul 14, 2003Jul 20, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6765291Aug 14, 2002Jul 20, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.IC package with dual heat spreaders
US6765803Jul 23, 2002Jul 20, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device socket
US6781839Jun 9, 2003Aug 24, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount apparatus with thermal carrier and method
US6800505Aug 29, 2002Oct 5, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads and related methods
US6800942Dec 27, 1999Oct 5, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable semiconductor device and methods
US6803656Aug 13, 2001Oct 12, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including combed bond pad opening
US6825547May 2, 2002Nov 30, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads
US6828173Apr 25, 2002Dec 7, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device including edge bond pads and methods
US6830719Feb 5, 2003Dec 14, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6837731Jun 10, 2003Jan 4, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Locking assembly for securing a semiconductor device to a carrier substrate
US6873037Jan 9, 2003Mar 29, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount package utilizing a back-to-back semiconductor device module
US6920688Aug 27, 2002Jul 26, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Method for a semiconductor assembly having a semiconductor die with dual heat spreaders
US6963128Jan 27, 2003Nov 8, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Vertically mountable and alignable semiconductor device assembly
US7015063May 29, 2002Mar 21, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods of utilizing a back to back semiconductor device module
US7040930Feb 3, 2005May 9, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Modular sockets using flexible interconnects
US7057291Sep 1, 2004Jun 6, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods for securing vertically mountable semiconductor devices in back-to back relation
US7082681May 1, 2003Aug 1, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods for modifying a vertical surface mount package
US7094108Mar 27, 2003Aug 22, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US7153164Mar 27, 2003Dec 26, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US7166252Dec 13, 2004Jan 23, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Method for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US7192311Aug 15, 2005Mar 20, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus for forming modular sockets using flexible interconnects and resulting structures
US7227261Aug 26, 2003Jun 5, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Vertical surface mount assembly and methods
US7282789Sep 1, 2004Oct 16, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Back-to-back semiconductor device assemblies
US7367845Nov 16, 2006May 6, 2008Micron Technology, Inc.Modular sockets using flexible interconnects
US7569418Sep 1, 2005Aug 4, 2009Micron Technology, Inc.Methods for securing packaged semiconductor devices to carrier substrates
US7871859Jul 23, 2002Jan 18, 2011Round Rock Research, LlcVertical surface mount assembly and methods
US8522051May 7, 2007Aug 27, 2013Infineon Technologies AgProtection for circuit boards
US8625298 *Oct 15, 2012Jan 7, 2014Infineon Technologies AgProtection for circuit boards
US20130063916 *Oct 15, 2012Mar 14, 2013Infineon Technologies AgProtection for Circuit Boards
Classifications
U.S. Classification257/678, 361/772, 361/748, 257/696, 257/733, 361/807, 361/783, 257/701
International ClassificationH05K1/18, H01L25/10, H05K3/30, H01L23/495
Cooperative ClassificationH01L2225/1029, H01L2225/107, H01L2225/1076, H01L25/105, H05K2203/1572, H05K2203/167, H01L23/49555, H05K2201/10522, H05K2201/09709, H05K2201/10454, H05K2201/10696, H05K3/303, H05K2201/10545, H05K1/181, H05K2201/10568, H01L2924/0002
European ClassificationH05K1/18B, H05K3/30C, H01L25/10J, H01L23/495G4B6