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Publication numberUSRE35749 E
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 08/710,744
Publication dateMar 17, 1998
Filing dateSep 20, 1996
Priority dateFeb 22, 1983
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS4876197, US5349059
Publication number08710744, 710744, US RE35749 E, US RE35749E, US-E-RE35749, USRE35749 E, USRE35749E
InventorsSteven Rosenberg, Patricia Tekamp-Olson
Original AssigneeChiron Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Constructs of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter and methods for expressing genes using said constructs
US RE35749 E
Abstract
Yeast promoters of glycolytic enzymes are modified by isolating a fragment encompassing the RNA polymerase binding site and joining to the 5' end of this fragment a DNA sequence providing for enhanced inducible or constitutive transcription of a structural gene. Constructs are prepared for efficient expression of foreign genes in yeast.
Yeast strains 2150-2-3(pC1/1GAPSOD) and AB110(pC1/1GAPATi9), producing human α1 -antitrypsin and superoxide dismutase, were desposited at the A.T.C.C. on May 9, 1984 and given Accession Nos. 20708 and 20709, respectively; and 2150-2-3(GAP5), 2150-2-3(Pyk5) and 2150-2-3(PHO5GAP1), expressing Hepatitis B surface antigen, were deposited at the A.T.C.C. on May 9, 1984 and given Accession Nos. 20705, 20706 and 20707, respectively.
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Claims(5)
What is claimed is:
1. A DNA construct for expression of heterologous proteins, wherein said construct comprises:
a structural gene encoding said heterologous protein, wherein said structural gene is under the regulatory control of a first domain; and
. .a.!. .Iadd.said .Iaddend.first domain .Iadd.being .Iaddend.proximal to said structural gene, said first domain comprising .Iadd.at least .Iaddend.about 200. .-500.!. bp, and including the RNA polymerase binding site and transcription initiation site of the yeast Saccharomyces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.
2. The DNA construct of claim 1, wherein said structural gene encodes Hepatitis B virus surface antigen.
3. The DNA construct of claim 2, wherein said construct is plasmid PHO5GAP1. .Iadd.
4. A method for expressing and producing a heterologous protein in yeast, which comprises:
expressing a structural gene encoding said heterologous protein in a yeast expression vector having an inserted DNA construct to produce said heterologous protein, said inserted DNA construct comprising:
said structural gene being under the regulatory control of a first domain; and
said first domain being proximal to said structural gene, said first domain comprising at least about 200 bp and including the RNA polymerase binding site and transcription initiation site of the yeast Saccharomyces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. .Iaddend..Iadd.5. The method of claim 4 wherein said structural gene encodes Hepatitis B virus
surface antigen. .Iaddend..Iadd.6. The method of claim 5 wherein said expression vector comprises the plasmid PHO5GAP1. .Iaddend..Iadd.7. The method of claim 4 wherein said structural gene encodes a protein for vaccines. .Iaddend..Iadd.8. The method of claim 4 wherein said first domain comprises about 200-500 bp. .Iaddend..Iadd.9. The DNA construct of claim 1 wherein said first domain comprises about 200-500 bp. .Iaddend.
Description

This application is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 07/635,048 filed Dec. 28, 1990, now abandoned, which is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 07/380,783 filed Jul. 18, 1989, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,089,398, .Iadd.which is a continuation of Ser. No. 073,381, filed Jul. 13, 1987, (now abandoned).Iaddend., which is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 06/609,540 filed May 11, 1984, now abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 06/468,589 filed Feb. 22, 1983, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

With the advent of hybrid DNA technology, production of mammalian proteins in microorganisms became a reality. For the first time, mammalian proteins could be synthesized in a unicellular microorganism by introduction of a gene encoding for the mammalian protein under the transcriptional and translational control of regulatory sequences recognized by the microorganism host. The introduction of these foreign constructions into a microorganism host resulted in competition between the regulatory signals of the construct and the regulatory signal endogenous to the host for the host systems involved with expression. The structural gene of interest is usually directed to a product which, is nonproductive and may be injurious to the host. Therefore, host cells which can turn off the foreign gene can effectively dominate modified host cells.

Substantially progress has been made in isolating sequences concerned with transcriptional and translational regulation for protein expression. But frequently flanking sequences, as well as distant sequences, may also affect the efficiency and regulation of the expression of the protein. Therefore, as one manipulates these various sequences, removing them from their native environment, and joining them to unnatural sequences, that is sequences other than the wild-type sequence, one can never be certain as to the result.

In order to enhance the economies of producing proteins in microorganisms, there have been substantial efforts directed to improving the efficiency of transcription and translation, maximizing the proportion of total protein directed to production of the desired product, enhancing the viability of the modified host, as well as improving the efficiency with which the modified host may be obtained.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Guarente et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1982) 79:7410-7414, describes a hybrid promoter region employing the GAL4 regulatory region. Guarente and Ptashne, ibid. (1981) 78:2199-2203, report the presence of two domains in a yeast promoter, with a region upstream from the TATA sequence providing an activation site. Kramer et al., ibid. (1984) 81:367-370, describe the regulated expression of a human interferon gene in yeast employing the yeast acid phosphatase promoter, where expression is induced by phosphate or a temperature shift. Tekamp-Olson et al., Cold Spring Harbor Meeting, Molecular Biology of Yeast, 1983, describe the absence of deleterious effects on yeast viability when employing "short" promoters, as distinct from the presence of such effects, when employing an extended promoter region or "long" promoters.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Novel hybrid promoter regions are provided for use in conjunction with constructs having a structural gene under the transcriptional control of the hybrid promoter region and a terminator region. The hybrid promoter comprises a first segment providing transcriptional enhancement, either constitutive or regulated, and a second segment defining an RNA polymerase binding site and transcriptional initiation site. The hybrid promoter regions lack the deleterious effects associated with a wild-type promoter region in recombinant constructs, which results in reduced transformation efficiencies and lower yeast viability.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of plasmids GAP1-6;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view of plasmids Pyk1-6; and

FIG. 3 indicates the DNA linker sequence and a flow diagram showing its use in a construct for hSOD.

DESCRIPTION OF THE SPECIFIC EMBODIMENTS

Novel DNA fragments are provided as well as constructions employing the fragments for enhanced expression of structural genes in a yeast host. The constructs employing a hybrid promoter region provide for enhanced efficiencies of transformation and greatly improved viability of the yeast host as contrasted with those employing a wild-type yeast promoter. Concomitant with the improved viability is increased expression of a structural gene, in comparison with the truncated promoter region, and, therefore, greatly enhanced overall yields of expression products.

For the purposes of the subject invention, the "promoter region" is divided into two domains: (1) the structural gene proximal region, which includes the transcription initiation site, the "TATA" sequence capping sequence, as appropriate, and an RNA polymerase binding sequence, which sequence intends a sequence which includes nucleotides upstream from the initiation site for directing the initiation of synthesis of the messenger RNA; and (2) a distal region which provides for regulated or constitutive expression, with enhanced expression as compared to the first domain linked to non-functional yeast DNA.

The hybrid promoters of the subject invention employ the RNA polymerase binding region of a yeast glycolytic enzyme promoter and a region upstream from said polymerase binding region, which is different from the wild-type upstream region of the RNA polymerase binding region and provides for enhanced efficiencies of transcription. This distal region will be derived from either a sequence, usually a yeast sequence, involved in regulation of transcription, or a prokaryotic sequence which provides for enhanced constitutive expression of the desired gene.

Conveniently, cassettes or constructs can be prepared which provide for one or more restriction sites intermediate the promoter region and a related terminator region where the structural gene may be inserted, so as to be under the transcriptional control of the hybrid promoter region. By leaving one or more restriction sites, one can provide for ease of insertion of the structural gene intermediate the transcription initiation and termination regions. The cassettes which can be prepared comprising the transcriptional initiation and termination region, having appropriate restriction sites for structural gene insertion can be cloned in prokaryotic vectors, so that after insertion of the structural gene, the resulting cassette, including the structural gene, may be cloned, isolated and purified, before introduction into a yeast vector.

The cassette, will for the most part, have the following formula: ##STR1## wherein:

P.R.(1) is the promoter region proximal to the structural gene and having the transcription initiation site, the RNA polymerase binding site, and including the TATA box, the CAAT sequence, as well as translational regulatory signals, e.g., capping sequence, as appropriate;

P.R.(-2) is the promoter region joined to the 5'-end of P.R.(1) associated with enhancing the efficiency of transcription of the RNA polymerase binding region;

R.S. is a sequence having one or more restriction recognition sites, preferably at least two restriction recognition sites, where the sites may result upon restriction into blunt ends or overhangs;

T.R. intends the termination region, which will include the terminator, which may be a stem and loop structure, and which may be associated with one or more stop codon, a polyadenylation signal sequence, if any, as well as any other transcriptional and translational termination sequences.

P.R.(1) will generally be at least about 150 bp, more usually at least about 200 bp, usually not more than about 600 bp, more usually not more than about 500 bp, generally not more than about 450 bp and preferably less than about 400 bp; the sequence will extend in the downstream direction of transcription to about bp +3, more usually bp -1 and may extend only to bp -20, more usually to bp -10 (the numbering intends that +1 is the first bp of the initiation codon with which the promoter region is associated in the wild-type host while -1 is the immediately upstream bp and the integers increase in the direction of transcription;

P.R.(1) will be deprived from a strong yeast promoter, normally a glycolytic enzyme promoter, such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, alcohol dehydrogenase, phosphoglucoisomerase, triose phosphate isomerase, phosphofructokinase, etc.;

P.R.(2) will provide for an enhancing function of transcription, which enhancing function may provide for constitutive or regulated transcription; regulators will be derived from regions associated with regulation of yeast genes, other than the natural or wild-type gene associated with the first domain in the wild-type or natural host, such as UDP-galactose epimerase (GAL10), galactokinase (GAL1), acid phosphatase (PHO5), etc. For yeast regulatory sequences, the domain will usually be at least about 100 bp, more usually at least about 200 bp, for convenience generally not exceeding about 3 kbp, usually not exceeding about 1 kbp, desirably not exceeding about 600 bp. The regulatory region will generally begin at least about 200 bp from the initiation codon, usually at least about 300 bp and may begin at 400 bp or farther upstream from the initiation codon.

Regulation can be as a result of a change in the chemical or physical environment of the host, such as a change in carbon source, e.g., glucose to galactose or vice versa; a change in concentration of a nutrient, e.g., an inorganic nutrient such as a phosphate; or a change in temperature, e.g., 25° C. to 35° C. Constitutive transcription can be achieved employing prokaryotic sequences of at least about 500 bp, usually 1 kbp or more, for convenience, generally not exceeding about 5 kbp; conveniently, the prokaryotic sequence can be obtained from the vector in which the cassette is cloned, illustrative vectors including pBR322, lambda, Charon 4A, pACYC184, pUC5, etc.

R.S. will generally be at least 4 bp, more usually at least 6 bp, and may be 100 bp or more, more usually being not more than about 60 bp and my include one or more, usually not more than about 10 restriction sites, where such restriction sites may be illustrated by EcoRI, BamHI, SalI, HindIII, AluI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaI, etc., having at least one unique restriction site for the construct sequences.

T.R. is the termination region which will include the necessary transcriptional and translational signals for termination, such as the polyadenylation site, etc.;

T.R. will generally be at least about 100 bp, more usually at 150 bp, and generally less than about 1 kbp, usually less than about 600 kbp; the termination region may be derived from any convenient yeast sequence, so long as the terminator balances the promoter, conveniently being derived from a glycolytic enzyme terminator, where the terminator may be associated with the same or different enzyme with which the promoter is associated.

Where a cassette is cloned in a bacterial vector, the construction will have the following formula: ##STR2## wherein all the symbols have been defined previously, except for: Rep (B), which intends a replicon or replication system recognized by a prokaryotic host and may be derived from a plasmid or phage, such as ColE1, and R plasmid, e.g., pRK290, lambda, e.g., Charon 4A, λdv, etc.;

M is a marker which provides for selection of hosts containing the construction, where (B) intends a prokaryotic, e.g., bacterial, host and a intends an integer of from 0 to 3, usually 1 to 2, although additional markers may be present, where the marker allows for selection of the host containing the construct as well as providing for selective pressure on maintaining hosts having the construct; the markers include biocide resistance, such as antibiotic resistance, toxin resistance and heavy metal resistance; providing prototrophy to an auxotrophic host; providing immunity; and the

the markers may provide for complementation of an auxotrophic host, e.g., his-, ura-, trp-, leu- genotype, resulting in prototrophy; resistance to metals, such as cup+ genotype; resistance to antibiotics, such as ampr, tcr, camr, strr, turr genotype, etc.;

b is 0 or 1, intending that the construction is either linear or circular, usually circular.

The above construct can he used for insertion of a wide variety of structural genes, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, both manually occurring and synthetic, where the genes may include signal leaders for secretion, and the like. The genes may express enzymes, hormones, proteins from pathogens for vaccines, structural proteins, lymphokines, membrane surface proteins, immunogloblins, blood proteins, or the like. The particular structural gene which is inserted is not critical to this invention and any polypeptide or protein of interest may be prepared employing the constructions of the subject invention. The structural genes will usually be foreign to the yeast host, where foreign intends different from wild-type yeast structural genes and from a source that does not normally exchange genetic information with yeast.

Usually, the structural gene will be at least about 36 bp, and not more than about 20 kbp, usually not more than about 3000 bp, usually not more than about 1500 bp. Included in the structural gene may be non-coding flanking regions, the 5'-flanking region normally being quite short, usually less than about 30 bp, while the 3'-flanking region may be extended, usually not exceeding about 500 bp. Thus, the structural gene fragment will usually include the translational stop codons for proper termination of amino acid chain extension.

When the structural gene has been inserted into the cassette which is joined to a yeast replication system, normally including one or more markers recognized by yeast, the resulting construct will have the following formula: ##STR3## wherein all of the symbols have been defined previously except for: gene, which intends the structural gene, having its initiation codon and stop codons as appropriate; and

Y, which intends that the symbol is related to yeast.

Convenient yeast replication systems include the 2 μm plasmid replication system, combination of CEN3 and ARS1 or ARS3, or the like. The replication systems may be high or low copy number, depending on the effect of the construct on the viability of the host. While the indicated replication systems are those which have found common employment, any replication system useful in yeast may be employed which provides for efficient replication and maintenance. Often the structural gene will be inserted into an appropriate shuttle vector capable of replication and selection in either a yeast or bacterial host, where the resulting construction will have the following formula: ##STR4## where all symbols have been defined previously. Also, it is, of course, understood that the cassette without an inserted structural gene but containing the restriction enzyme recognition sequence, R.S., my be propagated in yeast or contained within a shuttle vector, where the construction will have the following respective formulae: ##STR5## where all symbols have been defined previously.

The various fragments which form the cassette and final constructions may be joined together ha accordance with conventional ways. In many cases, genes have been isolated and restriction mapped, as well as sequenced. To that external one can select the sequence of interest by restriction of the gene, employing further manipulation as necessary such as resection with Bal31, in vitro mutagenesis, primer repair, or the like, to provide a fragment of a desired size, including the desired sequence, and having the appropriate termini. Linkers and adapters can be used for joining sequences, as well as replacing lost sequences, where the restriction site is internal to the region of interest. The various fragments which are isolated, maybe purified by electrophoresis, electroeluted, ligated to other sequence, cloned, reisolated and further manipulated.

The use of regulatory sequences for controlling transcription of the structural gene of interest allows for growing the host cells to high density with no or low levels of expression of the structural gene, and then inducing expression by changing the environmental conditions, e.g., nutrient, temperature, etc.

For example, with the GAL4 regulatory region, the yeast cells could be grown in rich media with a glycerol-lactic acid combination to high density, e.g., mid or late log phase, followed by switching the carbon source to galactose. For PHO5 regulation one could grow the cells at high phosphate, about 1 to 10 mM, and then decrease the phosphate concentration to about 0.1 to 0.5 mM. For temperature sensitivity, one could grow the cells at 25° to 37° C. and then change the temperature as appropriate by about 5° to 20° C. The host cells would have the regulatory system associated with the regulatory region employed.

Various techniques will be exemplified in the Experimental section of this application, which techniques can be used as paradigmatic for constructions employing fragments from sources other than those exemplified. Of particular interest, as evidenced by the Experimental section, will be the use of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter region for the RNA polymerase binding site in conjunction with regulator sequences, such as those associated with GAL4, PHO5, or the like. In referring to the GAL4 regulatory region or associated sequence, the region intends the sequence associated with regulation of other galactose metabolism genes, e.g., GAL1 and GAL10, which are under the regulatory control of such sequence in conjunction with the expression product of the GAL4 gene. The PHO5 sequence refers to a region associated with the PHO5 gene which provides for transcriptional regulation of the PHO5 gene.

The following examples are offered by way of illustration and not by way of limitation.

EXPERIMENTAL

All DNA manipulations were done according to standard procedures. See Molecular Cloning, T. Maniatis et al., Cold Spring Harbor Lab., 1982. Enzymes used in cloning were utilized as per the manufacturer's specifications. Enzymes were obtained either from New England Biolabs or Bethesda Research Laboratories. Procedures with these enzymes employed the supplier's directions. Yeast were transformed and grown using a variety of media including selective medium (yeast nitrogen base without lencine); YEPD medium, containing 1% (w/v) yeast extract, 2% (w/v) peptone and 2% (w/v) glucose, and others as appropriate and/or detailed below. In the case of plating media contained 2% (w/v) agar and for transformation 3% top agar. Hepatitis B surface antigen was determined after lysis of yeast by glass bead agitation and clarification by centrifugation, using the AusriaII assay (Abbott Laboratories). Protein is determined by the Coomassie dye binding method.

Construction of GAL regulator containing plasmids

Plasmid pLGSD5 is prepared as described in Gaurente et al., (1982) supra. The plasmid was manipulated as follows: After restriction with XhoI, the overhangs were filled in with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I ("Klenow fragment"), ligated with EcoRI linkers (GGAATTCC) and then completely digested with EcoRI and Sau3A to provide a 370 bp fragment which was isolated by gel electrophoresis and included the intergenic sequence between GAL1 and GAL10 genes of yeast, and provides for the GAL4 regulation sequence of the GAL1 and GAL10 genes.

This fragment was inserted into pBR322 which had been completely digested with EcoRI and BamHI, followed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase to prevent oligomerization. The resulting plasmid pBRGAL4 was treated in two different ways.

In the first procedure pBRGAL4 was completely digested with Sau3A, the overhangs filled in with the Klenow fragment, and the resulting blunt-ended fragment ligated with SalI linkers (CGTCGACG), followed by digestion with SalI and XhoI. The resulting 370 bp fragment was isolated by gel electrophoresis. This fragment has the original 370 bp yeast GAL4 regulator sequence with XhoI and SalI termini.

The second fragment was obtained by complete digestion of pBRGAL4 with XhoI and SalI to provide a XhoI-SalI fragment which included the 370 bp yeast GAL4 regulator sequence as well as about 280 bp of pBR322, the GAL4 sequence extending from Sau3A to SalI.

The two fragments were then cloned in the plasmid plot5. plot5 was prepared by inserting the 40 bp polylinker of the following sequence ##STR6## into pBR322 as an EcoRI-PvulI substitution followed by insertion of the trp-lac promoter (Russell and Bennett, Gene (1982) 20:231-245) into the PvuII site with transcription oriented toward the polylinker sequence. plot5 was completely digested with SalI, followed treatment with alkaline phosphatase and the 370 bp and 650 bp fragments independently inserted into plot5 to provide plasmids plot5GAL4/370 and plot5GAL4/650, respectively. Each of the plasmids was then completely digested with BamHI and SalI to reproduce the individual fragments extended by 6 bp of the polylinker fragment. These fragments were then ligated into pC1/1, which had been completely digested with BamHI and SalI followed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase to prevent recircularization. Plasmid pC1/1 is a derivative of pJDB219 (Beggs, Nature (1978) 275:104) in which the region corresponding to bacterial plasmid pMB9 in pJDB219 has been replaced by pBR322 in pC1/1. The resulting plasmids were designated pC1/1GAL4/370 and pC1/1GAL4/650, respectively. The BamHI-SalI fragment is located in the pBR322 portion of the vector pC1/1.

The next construction develops a hybrid promoter for expression of the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg or sAg), employing the RNA polymerase binding region of GAPDH. The previously prepared plasmid pHBS56/16-3, a yeast shuttle vector containing the alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (ADH1) promoter, the HBsAg gene and ADH terminator as a SphI fragment, was digested with SphI and the ends modified with Bam linkers. The Bam linkers have the sequence CGGATCCG.

pHBS56/16-3 was prepared as follows: A TaqI-HpaI fragment obtained from the HBsAg coding region which included 26 bp of the pre-sAg region, 681 bp of the sAg region and 128 bp of the 3'-untranslated region, was linked with EcoRI linkers and cloned at the EcoRI site in pBR322. The EcoRI linkers have the sequence GGAATTCC. The plasmid pHBS5 was thus obtained.

After digesting pHBS5 with EcoRI, the digest was resected with Bal31 and religated with EcoRI linkers (GGAATTCC). After digestion with EcoRI the material of about 800 bp was isolated from a polyacrylamide gel. This isolate was then recloned into pBR322 which had been digested with EcoRI and treated with alkaline phosphatase. Where the resection was to the sequence CATGG, which included the methionine codon, the EcoRI linker created an NcoI site. The plasmids were screened for the presence of an NcoI site and one of the plasmids chosen for further manipulation. This plasmid, designated pHBS5-3, was restricted with EcoRI, the EcoRI fragment made blunt-ended with Klenow fragment and dNTPs, and the blunt-ended fragment was then restricted with XbaI to provide an about 100 bp fragment having an XbaI overhang and blunt end at the former EcoRI site.

pHBS5 was then digested with ClaI, made blunt-ended with the Klenow fragment and dNTPs, digested with XbaI, followed by alkaline phosphatase treatment. The 100 bp fragment was then inserted into the vector to provide the plasmid pHBS6. Upon sequencing of the blunt-ended ligation site, it was found that an adenosine had been lost, so as to lose the EcoRI site, where the sequence was now ATCGATTCCCATGG. The ClaI and NcoI sites were retained. The loss of the A resulted in pKBS6 having a single EcoRI site.

pHBS5-3 was digested with EcoRI and the resulting EcoRI fragment having the sAg fragment isolated by gel electrophoresis and inserted into the vector pHBS16 (Valenzuela et al., Nature (1982) 298:347-350). This plasmid has the ADH1 promoter and the sAg gene in an EcoRI fragment in a plasmid containing the 2 μm origin, a TrpI gene and pBR322. The plasmid was digested with EcoRI, treated with alkaline phosphatase to prevent recircularization, and the EcoRI fragment from pHBS5-3 inserted to provide pHBS16-3, where the sAg gene isolated as a TaqI-HpaI fragment had been modified by Bal31 resection. The plasmid pHBS16-3 was digested with SphI and XbaI to provide a fragment which had the ADH promoter at the Sph terminus and the 5'-end of the sAg gene.

pHBS56 was then digested with SphI. pHBS56 was prepared from pC1/1 by digestion with SphI, which deletes a portion of the plasmid spanning the 2 μm-pBR322 joint. The active portion of the ADH1 promoter region is contained within the SphI-HindIII fragment of approximately 300 bp (Bennetzen et al., J. Biol. Chem. (1982) 257:301). The SphI site in the ADH promoter begins at position -413 and the yeast terminator sequence is contained within a HindIII-SphI fragment of about 330 bp. In each case the SphI site is distal to the coding region. A 1500 bp ADH1 promoter fragment terminating at position -9 (Hitzeman et al., Nature (1981) 293:717) and an approximately 450 bp terminator unit from nucleotides 913 to 1368 in the ADH gene nucleotide sequence were joined at a HindIII-site between the fragments and cloned into the BamHI site of the vector YEp13 (Broach and Hicks, Gene (1979) 8:121) to provide pADH5.

The HBsAg-DNA segment of pHBS5 was excised by EcoRI digestion, blunt-ended with the Klenow fragment and joined at both ends with HindIII linkers, CAAGCTTG. After digestion with HindIII, the HBsAg fragment was inserted into the HindIII site of the plasmid pADH5 which had been digested at the HindIII site intermediate the ADH1 promoter and terminator sequence. A plasmid with the HBsAg gene in the correct orientation as determined by restriction analysis was designated pRBS22. The cassette was included between two SphI restriction sites. pHBS22 was digested with SphI to obtain a fragment of about 1500 bp and inserted into SphI digested pC1/1 to provide pHBS56 which was cloned in E. coli HB101.

pHBS56 was digested with SphI and XbaI to provide a 1.1 kb fragment having the ADH terminator region and the 3'-portion of the sAg gene with the SphI site proximal to the terminator region. The 1.1 kb SphI-XbaI fragment was joined to the SphI-XhaI fragment from pHBS16-3, which resulted in providing the complete sAg gene in the correct orientation between the ADH promoter and terminator. This SphI-SphI fragment was then ligated to SphI digested pHBS56, replacing the cassette of pHBS56 to provide the plasmid pHBS56/16-3 with the resected sAg coding region fragment. The cassette was then excised from pHBS56/16-3 by digestion with SphI, followed by chewing back the overhangs with the Klenow fragment in the presence of dNTPs, then ligated with BamHI linkers, followed by digestion with BamHI to provide a 1.6 kb fragment which was isolated by gel electrophoresis. The fragment included the ADH promoter region, the sAg gene and ADH terminator region, as described above. This fragment was inserted into the BamHI site of pBR322 to provide pPGT16-3 which was digested with BamHI and XbaI and the resulting 1.1 kb fragment gel isolated, where the XbaI-BamHI fragment had the 3' portion of the sAg gene and the ADH terminator region.

pHBS6 was digested with XbaI and NcoI and the 94 bp fragment gel isolated to provide the 5'-portion of the sAg gene. A synthetic adapter was prepared of the formula ##STR7## having TaqI and NcoI termini and providing the -25 to -1 nucleotides of the GAPDH (GAP49) promoter and the initiation codon of the sAg gene. This synthetic fragment, the NcoI-XbaI fragment, and the XbaI-BamHI fragment were ligated simultaneously, followed by digestion with TaqI and BamHI. The resulting fragment was then substituted into pBR322 linearized with ClaI and BamHI, followed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. The resulting plasmid, which contains the -1 to -25 bp of the GAPDH promoter region, the sAg gene, and the ADH terminator, when the NcoI restriction site is lost was called pHBS6LGAPsAgtADH.

pGAP1, a plasmid prepared by insertion of a HindIII fragment containing the GAPDH gene GAP49 (Holland and Holland, J. Biol. Chem. (1979) 254:5466-5474) inserted in the HindIII site of pBR322, was digested with HinfI and a 500 bp promoter containing fragment isolated. The fragment was resected with Bal31 to remove about 50 or 90 bp, followed by ligation with HindIII linkers and digestion with HindIII. pBR322 was digested with HindIII, followed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase and the about 450 or 410 bp fragment inserted to provide pGAP128 and pGAP396, respectively.

pGAP128 was digested with HindIII, the fragment made blunt-ended with the Klenow fragment and dNTPs and the resulting 450 bp fragment isolated by gel electrophoresis. This fragment was inserted into SmaI digested plot5, which had been treated with alkaline phosphatase, to provide plasmid plot5pGAP128, which contained about -400 to +27 bp of the GAPDH promoter and coding region, Plasmid plot5pGAP396 was prepared from pGAP396 in an identical manner and thus differs from plasmid plot5pGAP128 in having about 15-30 fewer bp at each terminus of the GAPDH promoter region (about -385 to -3).

Plasmids GAP1-GAP4 were then prepared in the following manner. Plasmid plot5pGAP128 was digested with TaqI and BamHI to provide an about 390 bp TaqI-BamHI fragment which included the -26 to about -400 bp of the GAPDH promoter region and a portion of the HindIII and plot5 polylinker. pHBS6LGAPsAgtADH plasmid was also digested with TaqI and BamHI and a 1.1 -kb TaqI-BamHI fragment containing the 3'-terminus of the GAPDH promoter region, the sAg gene and the ADH terminator region was gel isolated and ligated to the other TaqI-BamHI fragment to provide a BamHI-BamHI fragment which included approximately 400 bp of the GAPDH promoter region, the sAg gene in proper orientation for transcriptional regulation by the GAPDH promoter, followed by the ADH terminator region. This fragment was ligated into pBR322 which had been digested with BamHI and treated with alkaline phosphatase to provide plasmid pPGT80. This BamHI cassette could now be isolated and inserted into plasmid pC1/1, at the BamHI site in the pBR322 portion of pC1/1, where in plasmid GAP1 the ADH terminator region is proximal to the ampr gene with the pBR322 portion divided into an approximately 4 kb sequence including the ampr gene and a 375 bp region separating the cassette from the 2 μm sequences. In GAP2, the pomoter is adjacent to the long pBR322 sequence with transcription in the same direction as the ampr gene. The same cassette was inserted into BamHI-digested pC 1/1 GAL4/650 to obtain plasmids GAP3 and GAP4, where GAP3 has the GAPDH promoter distal from the GAL4 regulator region and the long pBR322 sequence and GAP4 has the GAPDH promoter adjacent to the GAL4 regulator region, which is adjacent to the long pBR322 sequence.

Plasmids GAP5 and GAP6 were isolated as follows. Plasmid plot5pGAP396 was digested with SalI and TaqI and a fragment containing 9 bp of the plot5 polylinker sequence and the GAPDH promoter sequence extending from about -385 to -26 bp was isolated. An approximately 130 bp TaqI-XbaI fragment including -25 to -1 bp of the GAPDH promoter and +1 to +93 bp of the sAg gene was obtained from pHBS6LGAPsAgtADH. A 1.1 kb XbaI-SalI fragment containing the 3'-portion of the sAg gene and the ADH terminator as well as 6 bp of plot5 polylinker sequence was obtained from plasmid plot5sAgtADH (described below--Pyravate Kinase Promoter). These three fragments were ligated, digested with SalI and then cloned into SalI-digested pC1/1GAL4/370. GAP5 has the GAPDH promoter region adjacent to the GAL4 regulator region, which is proximal to the short pBR322 sequence, and GAP6 has the GAPDH promoter region distal from the GAL4 regulator region-and proximal to the long pBR322 sequence (see FIG. 1).

Pyruvate kinase promoter

Plasmid pHBS6Pyk containing the sAg gene under the transcriptional regulatory control of the Pyk promoter was obtained by cloning a 4.4 kb insert of yeast genomic DNA in pBR322 containing the Pyk gene and 911 nucleotides of 5'-untranslated region, and digestion of this plasmid pPyk9.1.1 with XbaI. After making the ends blunted-ended, the linear fragment was digested with BamHI providing a 912 bp BamHI-blunt fragment containing the Pyk promoter and 8 bases from the Pyk coding region. This fragment was inserted into the plasmid pHBS6, which had been digested with NcoI, blunt-ended and digested with BamHI. The plasmid pHBS6Pyk was totally digested with EcoRI, to obtain a fragment including the sAg gene and a portion of the Pyk promoter region. The fragment was made blunt-ended with the Klenow fragment and dNTPs, followed by ligation to BamHI linked digested with XbaI, which is internal to the sAg gene, the XbaI terminus made blunt-ended with the Klenow fragment and dNTPs, followed by digestion with BamHI, to provide a 580 bp BamHI-blunt-ended (XbaI) fragment. The plasmid plot5 was digested with EcoRI, made blunt-ended, digested with BamHI and treated with alkaline phosphatase and the two fragments joined to provide plasmids plot5PyksAg51 and plot5PyksAg.57. The two differ in that the BamHI site of the latter was not regenerated during cloning, possibly as a consequence of minimal nuclease contamination (digestion).

plot5 was treated as previously described (EcoRI digestion, blunt-ended, BamHI digestion and treatment with alkaline phosphatase) and joined to a 1.1 kb fragment obtained by digestion of pPGT16-3 with XbaI, followed by blunt ending, followed by digestion with BamHI and gel isolation. This fragment was introduced into plot5 to provide the plasmid plot5sAgtADH. Again the BamHI site in this plasmid was not regenerated, presumably due to digestion by contaminating nuclease.

Plasmids Pyk1 and Pyk2 were prepared as follows. Plasmid plot5PyksAg51 was digested with BamHI, then with XbaI, and an approximately 580 bp fragment containing about 480 bp of Pyk promoter and 93 bp of the 5'-end of the sAg gene was gel isolated. A 1.1 kb XbaI-SalI fragment containing the 3'-portion of the sAg gene, the ADH terminator and about 6 bp of the plot5 polylinker was isolated from plot5AgtADH. These two fragments were ligated, digested with BamHI and SalI and then cloned into plasmid pC1/1, which had been cleaved with BamHI and SalI and treated with alkaline phosphatase to yield plasmid Pyk1. Plasmid Pyk2 was prepared similarly but the 580 bp SalI-XbaI, Pyk promoter/HBsAg gene 5'-end fusion fragment was isolated from plot5PyksAg.57 and included about 6 bp of plot5 polylinker sequence upstream from the promoter region. Also the 1.1 kb XbaI-BamHI fragment containing the 3'-part of the HBsAg gene and the ADH terminator was derived from plasmid pPGT16-3.

Plasmids Pyk3-Pyk6 were prepared as follows. Plasmid plot5PyksAg51 was digested with BamHI, then with XbaI and the about 580 bp fragment containing the Pyk promoter and the 5'-part of the HBsAg gene isolated as above. The 1.1 kb BamHI-XbaI fragment, containing the 3'-portion of the HBsAg gene and ADH terminator, was recovered from pPGT16-3, also as above, and the two fragments ligated, digested with BamHI and inserted with different orientations into the BamHI site of pC1/1GAL4/650 (Pyk3, Pyk4). Plasmids Pyk5 and Pyk6 were prepared similarly except that the SalI-XbaI fragment containing the Pyk promoter and 5'-end of the sAg gene was isolated from plot5PyksAg.57 and the XbaI-SalI sAg gene 3'-portion/ADH terminator fusion fragment was derived from plot5sAgtADH and thus both fragments included approximately 6 bp of plot5 polylinker sequence. The cassette so formed was then cloned into the SalI site of pC1/1GAL4/370 in opposite orientations.

The six plasmids designated Pyk1-6 (see FIG. 2) are distinguished by Pyk1 having the promoter region proximal to the short pBR322 sequence; Pyk2 having the promoter region proximal to the long pBR322 sequence; Pyk3 having the promoter region proximal to the short pBR322 sequence and distal from the GAL4 sequence; while Pyk4 has the promoter region proximal to the GAL4 region, which in turn is proximal to the long pBR322 sequence; Pyk5 has the promoter region proximal to the GAL4 region which is proximal to the short pBR322 sequence; while Pyk6 has a promoter region distal from the GAL4 region and proximal to the long pBR322 sequence.

These plasmids described above were transformed into S. carlsbergensis strain 2150-2-3 (available from Lee Hartwell, University of Washington) under conventional conditions (Hinnen et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1978) 75:1929-1933). Cultures of 50-150 ml were grown to mid or late log phase in rich media (YEP) under neutral conditions (3% glycerol, 2% lactic acid), and then inducing conditions (+2% galactose), or repressing conditions (+2% glucose) for the final 1-2 generations. After lysis with glass beads and clarification of the supernatants by centrifugation, HBsAg expression was determined as described above. The results for the 12 plasmids are set forth in the following Table 1.

              TABLE 1______________________________________Expression of HBsAg from Gal Regulated Hybrid Promoters  YEP +  Glycerol/  Lactic acid          YEP +     YEP +   Induction  μg sAg/          Galactose Glucose (Gal/glycerolConstruction    mg protein              μg sAg/mg protein                            lactic acid)______________________________________GAP1     0.04      0.09      0.02  2.0GAP2     1.65      0.8       1.5   0.5GAP3     0.25      0.30      --    1.2GAP4     0.10      0.75      --    7.5GAP5     0.25      2.1       --    8.4GAP6     1.55      1.4       1.0   0.9PYK1     0.10      0.30      0.14  3.0PYK2     1.65      1.4       1.1   0.85PYK3     0.10      0.15      --    1.5PYK4     0.10      1.0       0.05  10.0PYK5     0.03      1.4       0.02  47.0PYK6     1.7       1.8       0.9   0.9______________________________________
Construction of pPGAP

A yeast expression vector was prepared called pPGAP having a polyrestriction site linker between the GAPDH terminator and short promoter region. Plasmid mid plot5pGAP128 was digested with BamHI and TaqI to yield an approximately 390 bp BamHI-TaqI fragment having the -400 to -26 bp of the GAPDH promixer. The BamHI-TaqI fragment was ligated to a synthetic fragment having the following sequence: ##STR8## to provide a BamHI-SalI fragment, which was digested with BamHI and SalI and used to replace the BamHI-SalI fragment of BamHI-SalI digested pBR322 treated with alkaline phosphatase. After ligation, the plasmid pGAPNRS was obtained which was digested with BamHI and SalI to provide a 400 bp BamHI-SalI fragment which was gel isolated. This fragment was ligated to an about 900 bp SalI-BamHI fragment containing the GAPDH terminator region and a short segment of 3' coding region and the resulting 1.4 kb BamHI-BamHI fragment digested with BamHI. The SalI-BamHI GAPDH terminator fragment was obtained by SalI and BamHI digestion of pGAP2, a plasmid prepared by insertion of an about 3.3 kb BamHI fragment containing the GAPDH gene GAP49 (Holland and Holland, supra) into the BamHI site of pBR322. Plasmids pGAP2 and pGAP1 were obtained as follows: A yeast gene library was prepared by inserting fragments obtained after partial digestion of total yeast DNA with restriction endonuclease Sau3A in lambda-phage Charon 28 (Blattner et al., Science (1977) 196:161-169). The phage library was screened with DNA complementary to the yeast GAPDH mRNA and the yeast GAPDH gene from one of these clones was subcloned as either an about 3.3 kb BamHI fragment in the BamHI site of pBR322 (pGAP-2) or as an about 2.1 kb HindIII fragment in the HindIII site of pBR322 (pGAP-1).

pBR322 was digested with EcoRI and SalI, the termini blunt-ended and ligated to BamHI linkers, followed by BamHI digestion and the BamHI-BamHI 3.8 kb fragment gel isolated, recircularized by self-ligation, cloned and designated pBRΔR1-Sal. The 1.4 kb BamHI-BamHI fragment was inserted into the BamHI-digested, alkaline phosphatase treated pBRΔR1-Sal vector to provide the plasmid pPGAP of about 5.3 kb with the orientation in the opposite direction of the ampr.

The plasmid phSOD was prepared as follows:

Molecular cloning of hSOD cDNA

Total RNA was prepared from an adult human liver by the guanidinium thiocyanate/lithium chloride method (Cathala et al., DNA (1983) 2:329-435). polyA RNA was used to synthesize double-stranded cDNA (Maniatis et al., Molecular Cloning, 213-242, Cold Spring Harbor, 1982) and this was passed over a Sepharose CL4B column to enrich for cDNAs of greater than 350 bp (Fiddes and Goodman, Nature (1979) 281:351-356). The cDNA was inserted at the PstI site of plot4, a pBR322 derivative having the following sequence replacing the PstI-EcoRI site. The cDNA insertion employed the oligo-dG:dC tailing method (Maniatis et al., supra). E. coli strain D1210 was transformed with this mixture and transformants selected on L-agar containing 10 μg/ml tetracycline (Kushner, S. R. (1978) In: Genetic Engineering eds. Boyer, H. B. and Nicosia, S., (Elsevier/North Holland, Amsterdam) p. 17). Plasmid DNA constituting at liver cDNA library was prepared (Maniatis et al., Molecular Cloning, pp. 86-94, Cold Spring Harbor 1982) directly from approximately 62,060 recombinant colonies plated at a density of approximately 3,000 colonies per 9 cm diameter Petri dish.

Isolation of r-hSOD clones

Strain D1210 was retransformed with the liver cDNA library and about 40,000 clones were grown on nine 14 cm diameter Petri dishes. After transfer of the colonies to nitrocellulose paper and chloramphenicol amplification of plasmid DNA, the cells were lysed and the filters prepared for hybridization (Ish-Horowicz and Burke, Nucleic Acids Research (1981) 9:2989-2998). Oligonucleotide probes were employed for screening by hybridization, with the probes consisting of enzymatically-radiolabeled, chemically-synthesized DNA molecules complementary to the mRNA encoding amino acid residues 19 to 24 of the protein (Jabusch et al., supra.; Barra et al., supra.); the mixture had the following sequences: ##STR9## where all of the indicated possibilities for encoding the peptide sequence were prepared (32-fold degenerate).

The probes were labeled with 32 P to a specific activity of 1-3×108 cpm/μg and Millipore (0.45 μm) filtered before use. Filters were prehybridized for 6 hrs at 30° C. in 4×SSC, 2×Denhardts's solution, 40 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7.5, 300 μg/ml sonicated salmon testes DNA. Hybridization was for 20 hrs at 30° C. in the same solution containing 2×106 cpm/ml hSOD DNA probe (residues 19-24). Filters were washed in 4×SSC, once for 15 min at r.t. and twice for 15 min at 30° C., blotted dry and autoradiographed with an intensifying screen for 24 hrs at -70° C.

Areas on the master plates that corresponded to duplicate positive signals were picked into L-broth and plasmid DNA prepared by the miniscreen procedure (Maniatis et al., Molecular Cloning, 178, 368-369, Cold Spring Harbor 1982). This DNA was cut with PstI and subjected to Southern blot analysis (Southern, J. Mol. Biol. (1975) 98:503-517) hybridizing initially with the previous labeled probes (amino acid residues 19-24) and then with additional radiolabeled probes derived from amino acid residues 109-114 and having the following sequences (all possible variations, 72-fold degenerate) present as a mixture: ##STR10## One plasmid pool (pSOD1) contained a cDNA inserts of 520 bp that hybridized with both probes and after colony purification, plasmid DNA was prepared from this clone and sequenced by the method of Maxam and Gilbert (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1977) 74:560-564). The hSOD cDNA clone pSOD1 constitutes the coding region for amino acids 10-153 of hSOD, a single translational stop codon and a 3' untranslated region. Therefore, in the expression vector construct, the base sequence of the region encoding amino acids 1-9 is derived from the published amino acid sequence of hSOD (Jabusch et al., supra; Barra et.al., supra) and synthesized chemically as a part of the variable linker segment (see discussion relating to FIG. 3).

Construction of plot5 derivatives containing r-hSOD

The synthetic DNA molecules F(26), C(16), B(31), D(11), E(13) and 4(24) shown in FIG. 3, were synthesized by the phosphoramidite method.

The single strand 4(24) was prepared by using all four bases, at each site where X is indicated. Furthermore, silica was withdrawn from the synthesis of the 24 mer, such that single-stranded 21 mers, 22 mers, and 23 mers are obtained in addition to the 24 mers. After removal from the silica support, the four mixtures are combined in appropriate proportions to provide for equimolar amounts of each of the possible single strands. This mixture was treated as a single product in the subsequent steps.

Molecules F(26), C(16), B(31) and D(11) were mixed together in equimolar amounts and 10 μg phosphorylated using T4 polynucleotide kinase. After phenol-ether extraction, the additional non-phosphorylated synthetic DNA molecules 4(24) and E(13) were added, such that all fragments were equimolar. The equimolar mixture contained 13 μg of DNA in 133 μl of 0.3×kinase buffer.

After annealing by cooling at a uniform rate from 70° C. to 20° C. over 60 min, the single strands were ligated together with T4 ligase in 200 μl ligation mix at 14° C. for 4 hrs, phenol-chloroform extracted, ethanol precipitated and the 5'-ends of 4(24) and E(13) phosphorylated using T4 polynucleotide kinase (Maniatis et al., supra). Preparative polyacrytamide gel electrophoresis was used to isolate the completely ligated 53 bp material having 5'- and 3'-overhangs.

The above purified fragment mixture was then ligated to the 460 bp TaqI-PstI segment of the hSOD cDNA as shown in FIG. 3. This segment was itself constructed by isolating the 454 bp TaqI-AluI hSOD fragment, making it flush-ended using Klenow and inserting it into plot5 between its EcoRI and SalI sites which had been similarly made flush-ended. After preparation of plasmid DNA from this recombinant, the 460 bp TaqI-PstI hSOD fragment was isolated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After extraction and precipitation, the 515 bp fragment resulting from the joining of the synthetic fragment to the 460 bp TaqI-PstI hSOD fragment was blunt-ended (525-528 bp) and then digested with SalI and the resulting 519-522 bp hSOD fragment isolated by polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis. This fragment was then inserted into plot5 which had been digested with PvuII and SalI and then treated with alkaline phosphatase. The resulting plasmids were used to transform strain D1210. Recombinants obtained after transformation of strain D1210 were selected on L-agar containing 100 μg/ml ampicillin to give a set of clones, which were screened for an NcoI site. One was selected and designated phSOD.

Construction of a yeast vector for SOD expression

The plasmid phSOD was ligated with NcoI and SalI and a 550 bp fragment obtained, which included 1 nucleotide untranstated at the 5'-terminus and the entire coding region for hSOD. pPGAP was digested with NcoI and SalI followed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase and the SalI-NcoI fragment substituted for the NcoI-SalI fragment in pPGAP to provide pPGAPSOD. BamHI digestion of pPGAPSOD resulted in a 2 kb fragment which was gel isolated and inserted into the BamHI site of pC1/1 and pC1/1 GAL4/370. These plasmids were transformed into yeast strain 2150-2-3 as described previously, with the results of expression set forth in the following Table 2.

              TABLE 2______________________________________Expression of Human SOD in Yeast Strain 2150                      SOD2Plasmid         Carbon Source                      μg/mg protein______________________________________pC1/1           g, L.sup.  0pC1/1GAPSOD     g, L       148pC1/1GALGAPSOD  g, L       0.4           gal        68______________________________________ 1 All cultures grown in Minus Leucine media with 2% lactic acid, 3% glycerol with or without 2% galactose to late log or early stationary phase. 2 Determined by RIA.

hSOD levels were measured using a standard radioimmunoassay with iodinated authentic hSOD as standard. Constitutive synthesis from the GAP promoter leads to very high levels of hSOD production, of the order of 10-30% of the total cell protein. The induction with galactose works almost as well, yielding about 7% of the cell protein as hSOD.

Cloning of alpha-1-antitrypsin

A cDNA library was made from 10 μg of polyA+ RNA isolated from a part of a human liver. This library was prepared by oligo-dT priming of the first cDNA strand and self-priming of the second cDNA strand. The ds cDNA was size fractionated on a Sepharose CL4B column and those molecules greater than 300 bp isolated. This fraction was treated with nuclease S1 and tailed with dCTP, using terminal transferase. The tailed cDNA was annealed to pBR322 which had been digested with PstI and tailed with dGTP. Transformation of E. coli HB101 yielded 60,000 colonies, where greater than 90% of the clones were recombinant.

Two synthetic oligonucleotide probes were used to isolate the alpha-1-antitrypsin (α1 -AT) cDNA, the first probe corresponding to amino acid residues 344-350 near the C-terminus of the protein was used to probe 5,000 colonies and the second probe, corresponding to amino acid residues -23 to -17 (+1 being the first nucleotide of the first codon of the mature α1 -AT) of the signal peptide, was used to probe 25,000 colonies. The probe sequences were taken from the partial nucleotide sequence described by Kurachi et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1981) 78:6826; Leicht et al., Nature (1982) 297:655). Approximately 3% of the colonies hybridized to the C-terminal probe and four hybridized to the N-terminal probe. The four N-terminal clones and 12 C-terminal clones were isolated and subjected to restriction analysis. From these, three overlapping clones which cover the entire cDNA were subjected to further study and were used to construct the full-length cDNA clone.

The entire sequence of a composite full length cDNA derived from the three plasmids is as follows:

__________________________________________________________________________                                              -24                                              Met                                                 Pro                                                    Ser                                                       SerGGGGGGGGGGAGGGTAATCGACA                            ATG                                                 CCG                                                    TCT                                                       TCT   -20                           -10                        -1   Val Ser    Trp       Gly          Ile             Leu                Leu                   Leu                      Ala                         Gly                            Leu                               Cys                                  Cys                                     Leu                                        Val                                           Pro                                              Vaql                                                 Ser    Leu                                                 Ala   GTC TCG    TGG       GGC          ATC             CTC                CTG                   CTG                      GCA                         GGC                            CTG                               TGC                                  TGC                                     CTG                                        GTC                                           CCT                                              GTC                                                 TCC    CTG                                                 GCT   Glu Asp    Pro       Gln          Gly             Asp                Ala                   Ala                      Gln                         Lys                            Thr                               Asp                                  Thr                                     Ser                                        His                                           His                                              Asp                                                 Gln    Asp                                                 His1  GAG GAT    CCC       CAG          GGA             GAT                GCT                   GCC                      CAG                         AAG                            ACA                               GAT                                  ACA                                     TCC                                        CAC                                           CAT                                              GAT                                                 CAG    GAT                                                 CAC     BamHI21 Pro Thr    Phe       Asn          Lys             Ile                Thr                   Pro                      Asn                         Leu                            Ala                               Glu                                  Phe                                     Ala                                        Phe                                           Ser                                              Leu                                                 Tyr                                                    Arg                                                       Gln61 CCA ACC    TTC       AAC          AAG             ATC                ACC                   CCC                      AAC                         CTG                            GCT                               GAG                                  TTC                                     GCC                                        TTC                                           AGC                                              CTA                                                 TAC    CGC                                                 CAG41 Leu Ala    His       Gln          Ser             Asn                Ser                   Thr                      Asn                         Ile                            Phe                               Phe                                  Ser                                     Pro                                        Val                                           Ser                                              Ile                                                 Ala    Thr                                                 Ala121   CTG GCA    CAC       CAG          TCC             AAC                AGC                   ACC                      AAT                         ATC                            TTC                               TTC                                  TCC                                     CCA                                        GTG                                           AGC                                              ATC                                                 GCT    ACA                                                 GCC61 Phe Ala    Met       Leu          Ser             Leu                Gly                   Thr                      Lys                         Ala                            Asp                               Thr                                  His                                     Asp                                        Glu                                           Ile                                              Leu                                                 Glu    Gly                                                 Leu181   TTT GCA    ATG       CTC          TCC             CTG                GGG                   ACC                      AAG                         GCT                            GAC                               ACT                                  CAC                                     GAT                                        GAA                                           ATC                                              CTG                                                 GAG    GGC                                                 CTG81 Asn Phe    Asn       Leu          Thr             Glu                Ile                   Pro                      Glu                         Ala                            Gln                               Ile                                  His                                     Glu                                        Gly                                           Phe                                              Gln                                                 Glu    Leu                                                 Leu241   AAT TTC    AAC       CTC          ACG             GAG                ATT                   CCG                      GAG                         GCT                            CAG                               ATC                                  CAT                                     GAA                                        GGC                                           TTC                                              CAG                                                 GAA    CTC                                                 CTCArg(a,c)                                     Asp                                           Gly(c)101   His Thr    Leu       Asn          Gln             Pro                Asp                   Ser                      Gln                         Leu                            Gln                               Leu                                  Thr                                     Thr                                        Gly                                           Asn                                              Gly                                                 Leu                                                    Phe                                                       Leu301   CAT ACC    CTC       AAC          CAG             CCA                GAC                   AGC                      CAG                         CTC                            CAG                               CTG                                  ACC                                     ACC                                        GGC                                           AAT                                              GGC                                                 CTG    TTC                                                 CTC121   Ser Glu    Gly       Leu          Lys             Leu                Val                   Asp                      Lys                         Phe                            Leu                               Glu                                  Asp                                     Val                                        Lys                                           Lys                                              Leu                                                 Tyr    His                                                 Ser361   AGC GAG    GGC       CTG          AAG             CTA                GTG                   GAT                      AAG                         TTT                            TTG                               GAG                                  GAT                                     GTT                                        AAA                                           AAG                                              TTG                                                 TAC    CAG                                                 TCA141   Glu Ala    Phe       Thr          Val             Asn                Phe                   Gly                      Asp                         Thr                            Glu                               Glu                                  Ala                                     Lys                                        Lys                                           Gln                                              Ile                                                 Asn    Asp                                                 Tyr421   GAA GCC    TTC       ACT          GTC             AAC                TTC                   GGG                      GAC                         ACC                            GAA                               GAG                                  GCC                                     AAG                                        AAA                                           CAG                                              ATC                                                 AAC    GAT                                                 TAC161   Val Glu    Lys       Gly          Thr             Gln                Gly                   Lys                      Ile                         Val                            Asp                               Leu                                  Val                                     Lys                                        Glu                                           Leu                                              Asp                                                 Arg    Asp                                                 Thr481   GTG GAG    AAG       GGT          ACT             CAA                GGG                   AAA                      ATT                         GTG                            GAT                               TTG                                  GTC                                     AAG                                        GAG                                           CTT                                              GAC                                                 AGA    GAC                                                 ACA181   Val Phe    Ala       Leu          Val             Asn                Tyr                   Ile                      Phe                         Phe                            Lys                               Gly                                  Lys                                     Trp                                        Glu                                           Arg                                              Pro                                                 Phe    Glu                                                 Val541   GTT TTT    GCT       CTG          GTG             AAT                TAC                   ATC                      TTC                         TTT                            AAA                               GGC                                  AAA                                     TGG                                        GAG                                           AGA                                              CCC                                                 TTT    GAA                                                 GTC                                  Ala(b)201   Lys Asp    Thr       Glu          Glu             Glu                Asp                   Phe                      His                         Val                            Asp                               Gln                                  Val                                     Thr                                        Thr                                           Val                                              Lys                                                 Val                                                    Pro                                                       Met601   AAG GAC    ACC       GAG          GAA             GAG                GAC                   TTC                      CAC                         GTG                            GAC                               CAG                                  GTG                                     ACC                                        ACC                                           GTG                                              AAG                                                 GTG    CCT                                                 ATG                                        BstEII221   Met Lys    Arg       Leu          Gly             Met                Phe                   Asn                      Ile                         Gln                            His                               Cys                                  Lys                                     Lys                                        Leu                                           Ser                                              Ser                                                 Trp                                                    Val                                                       Leu661   ATG AAG    CGT       TTA          GGC             ATG                TTT                   AAC                      ATC                         CAG                            CAC                               TGT                                  AAG                                     AAG                                        CTG                                           TCC                                              AGC                                                 TGG    GTG                                                 CTG                      Asn(c)241   Leu Met    Lys       Tyr          Leu             Gly                Asn                   Ala                      Thr                         Ala                            Ile                               Phe                                  Phe                                     Leu                                        Pro                                           Asp                                              Glu                                                 Gly                                                    Lys                                                       Leu721   CTG ATG    AAA       TAC          CTG             GGC                AAT                   GCC                      ACC                         GCC                            ATC                               TTC                                  TTC                                     CTG                                        CCT                                           GAT                                              GAG                                                 GGG    AAA                                                 CTA261   Gln His    Leu       Glu          Asn             Glu                Leu                   Thr                      His                         Asp                            Ile                               Ile                                  Thr                                     Lys                                        Phe                                           Leu                                              Glu                                                 Asn    Glu                                                 Asp781   CAG CAC    CTG       GAA          AAT             GAA                CTC                   ACC                      CAC                         GAT                            ATC                               ATC                                  ACC                                     AAG                                        TTC                                           CTG                                              GAA                                                 AAT    GAA                                                 GAC                               EcoRV281   Arg Arg    Ser       Ala          Ser             Leu                His                   Leu                      Pro                         Lys                            Leu                               Ser                                  Ile                                     Thr                                        Gly                                           Thr                                              Tyr                                                 Asp                                                    Leu                                                       Lys841   AGA AGG    TCT       GCC          AGC             TTA                CAT                   TTA                      CCC                         AAA                            CTG                               TCC                                  ATT                                     ACT                                        GGA                                           ACC                                              TAT                                                 GAT    CTG                                                 AAGVal(a,c)301   Ser Ile    Leu       Gly          Gln             Leu                Gly                   Ile                      Thr                         Lys                            Val                               Phe                                  Ser                                     Asn                                        Gly                                           Ala                                              Asp                                                 Leu                                                    Ser                                                       Gly901   AGC ATC    CTG       GGT          CAA             CTG                GGC                   ATC                      ACT                         AAG                            GTC                               TTC                                  AGC                                     AAT                                        GGG                                           GCT                                              GAC                                                 CTC    TCC                                                 GGG321   Val Thr    Glu       Glu          Ala             Pro                Leu                   Lys                      Leu                         Ser                            Lys                               Ala                                  Val                                     His                                        Lys                                           Ala                                              Val                                                 Leu    Thr                                                 Ile961   GTC ACA    GAG       GAG          GCA             CCC                CTG                   AAG                      CTC                         TCC                            AAG                               GCC                                  GTG                                     CAT                                        AAG                                           GCT                                              GTG                                                 CTG    ACC                                                 ATC 341 1021   Asp GAC Glu GAG    Lys AAA       Gly GGG          Thr ACT             Glu GAA                Ala GCT                   Ala GCT                      Gly GGG                         Ala GCC                            Met ATG                               Phe TTT                                  Leu TTA                                     Glu GAG                                        Ala GCC                                           Ile ATA                                              Pro CCC                                                  ##STR11##                                                 Ile ATC361   Pro Pro    Glu       Val          Lys             Phe                Asn                   Lys                      Pro                         Phe                            Val                               Phe                                  Leu                                     Met                                        Ile                                           Glu                                              Gln                                                 Asn                                                    Thr                                                       Lys1081   CCC CCC    GAG       GTC          AAG             TTC                AAC                   AAA                      CCC                         TTT                            GTC                               TTC                                  TTA                                     ATG                                        ATT                                           GAA                                              CAA                                                 AAT    ACC                                                 AAG       AvaI381   Ser Pro    Leu       Phe          Met             Gly                Lys                   Val                      Val                         Asn                            Pro                               Thr                                  Gln                                     Lys                                        OC1141   TCT CCC    CTC       TTC          ATG             GGA                AAA                   GTG                      GTG                         AAT                            CCC                               ACC                                  CAA                                     AAA                                        TAA                                           CTGCCTCTCGCTCCTCAAC                             HinfI                         AAT                            CCC                               ACC                                  CAA                                     AAA                                        TAG                            GGG                               TGG                                  GTT                                     TTT                                        ATC                                           AGCT                                               SalI__________________________________________________________________________ LEGEND Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of α1 -AT cDNA. The reactive center metser at positions 358-359 is boxed. Subscripts to amino acids in parentheses identify differences between the subject protein sequence and those derived from (a) protein sequencing (Carrell et al., 1982), (b) the cDNA of Woo et al.,  see Carrell et al., 1982!), and (c) the cDNA of Bollen et al., 1983. The synthetic DNA molecules used in the construction of the BamHI to SalI fragment encoding the mature protein are shown as are the cDNA restriction sites used in this construction.

The above sequence was determined using the dideoxy sequencing method of Sanger et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1977) 74:5463, in the M13 vectors of Messing et al., Nucleic Acids Res. (1981) 9:309. The differences at the nucleotide and amino acid level from the published cDNA sequences are shown.

Construction of the full length clone for expression of yeast began with three fragments isolated from cDNA clones: 1) a 630 bp BamHI-BstEII fragment; 2) a 450 bp BstEII-AvaI fragment; and 3) an 85 bp AvaI-HinfI fragment. A synthetic adapter was employed having the following sequence: ##STR12## Approximately two pmoles of fragments 1 and 2 were ligated together and after removal of the ligase, digested with BamHI and AvaI. Fragment 3 and the synthetic adapter were ligated and digested with AvaI and SalI and the two resulting fragment mixtures were ligated followed by digestion with BamHI and SalI. Fragments migrating upon electrophoresis in the region of about 1000-1400 bp were isolated and cloned by substitution into BamHI and SalI digested and alkaline phosphatase treated pBR322. The resulting plasmid is referred to as pATi.

Plasmid pPGAP was digested with NcoI, followed by blunt-ending, followed by SalI digestion and treatment with alkaline phosphatase. The NcoI-SalI fragment was substituted with an approximately 1250 bp blunt-ended (BamHI)-SalI fragment obtained from plasmid pATi, by BamHI digestion, blunt ending, and SalI digestion. This was inserted into the pPGAP vector to produce the plasmid pGAPATi, a 6.6 kb plasmid, which was digested with NcoI and BamHI and a 2.3 kb NcoI-BamHI fragment obtained having the α1 -AT gene and the GAPDH terminator and approximately 400 bp BamHI-NcoI fragment obtained having the GAPDH promoter. These fragments were treated together and inserted into the BamHI site of pC1/1. The plasmids pC1/1GAPATi8 and pC1/1GAPATi9 were obtained with the orientation of expression clockwise in the former and counterclockwise in the latter, with ampr being in the counterclockwise direction. These plasmids were transformed in S. cerevisiae AB103 (A.T.C.C. No. 20658, deposited Jan. 5, 1983) by standard methods, selecting for leucine prototrophy and grown as described above. Yeast extracts were prepared by lysis with glass beads and the α1 -AT activity determined by inhibition of human leukocyte elastase.

Assays contained in 1 ml: 1:0-0.2 human leukocyte elastase (HLE); 0.1 mM MeO-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-p-nitroanilide (Batty et al., J. Biol. Chem. (1980) 255:3931); 50 mM Tris, pH 8, 0.5M NaCl, and the indicated amounts of yeast extract or human α1 -AT. Assays were initiated by the addition of elastase, incubated at 28° C. for 15 min, terminated by the addition of 100 μl of 8N acetic acid and the absorbance at 410 nm determined. Typical results are shown in the following Table 3.

              TABLE 3______________________________________           Amt.    Amt. Amt.  %           Extract HLE  Protein                              Elastase                                    %Plasmid Strain  (μl) (μg)                        (μg)                              Activity                                    α1 -AT*______________________________________pC1/    AB103   5.0     0.1  50.0  40    0.17IGAPATi8        10.0    0.1  100.0 26    0.11pC1/    AB103   0.25    0.1  2.3   89    0.7IGAPATi9        1.0     0.1  9.1   26    1.2pC1/    AB110   0.2     0.2  2.9   39    6.1IGAPATi9        0.4     0.2  4.8   14    4.3______________________________________ *Calculation based upon the Mol. wt. of HLE (29 kD), the amount of protei added and the degree of inhibition.

The above data demonstrate that plasmids having the orientation of the expression cassette in the counterclockwise orientation, the promoter proximal to the long sequence of pBR322, make 10-20 times more α1 -AT than the same cassette in the other orientation.

Yeast strain AB110

Yeast strain 2150-2-3 was crossed with a yeast strain AB103 transformant containing pC1/1GAPATi9. The diploids were sporulated and the tetrads disected. Strains were maintained on leucine selective plates in order to ensure maintenance of the plasmid, since the parents are auxotrophs. A series of colonies were screened for their genotype with respect to a number of markers. The most vigorous strains were selected and cultures grown on leucine selective media. The best strain was designated AB110 (pC1/1GAPATi9), gave 6-7.5% of the total cell protein as α1 -AT as shown in the above Table 3. The strain AB110 has the following genotype: Matα, ura3-52, leu2-04 or both leu2-3 and leu2-112, pep4-3, his4-580 (cir°).

Phosphate induction

Plasmid pPGT80 was digested with BamHI, the ends blunt-ended, followed by digestion with XbaI and the 500 bp fragment containing the GAPDH promoter and 5'-end of the sAg gene isolated.

The PHO5 gene was isolated from a yeast genomic library employing an oligonucleotide probe 5'-GGCACTCACACGTGGGACTAG-3' derived from the published partial sequence (Meyhack et. al., The EMBO Journal (1932) 1:675-680). A subfragment of this clone containing 550 bp of the 5'-untranslated region and approximately 80 bp of coding sequence was subcloned as a BamHI-SalI substitution in pBR322 to provide pPHO5. This fragment has the sequence 5'-ATGTTTAAA-3', encoding the first three amino acids, the second and third codons specifying an AhaIII site. The plasmid pHBS6 was digested with NcoI, blunt-ended, followed by digestion with BamHI and treatment with alkaline phosphatase. The PHO5 promoter region was obtained by digesting the pPHO5 plasmid with AhaIII, resecting the resulting fragment with Bal31 for a short time, followed by digestion with BamHI and isolation of a 500-550 bp BamHI blunt-ended fragment. This fragment was employed for substitution of the NcoI-BamHI fragment from pHBS6 and was screened for regeneration of the NcoI restriction site to provide plasmid pHBS6PHO5/1.

Plasmid pHBS6PHO5/1 was digested with BstEII which cleaves at position -175 in the PHO5 promoter. This molecule was blunt-ended, digested with SalI and the 650 bp fragment having the 5'-portion of the promoter domain, containing 275 bp of pBR322 and 375 bp of the PHO5 promoter region isolated. This fragment was ligated with the blunt-ended (BamHI)-XbaI fragment obtained from digestion of pPGT80 with BamHI, blunt ending, followed by XbaI digestion. After digesting the ligated fragment with SalI and XbaI, the resulting fragment was then substituted into pPGT16-3 which had been digested with SalI and XbaI and treated with alkaline phosphatase. The resulting plasmid pPHO5PGT80 had a cassette comprising the PHO5 regulatory region, the GAPDH promoter, the sAg gene and the ADH terminator. This cassette was excised from the plasmid by BamHI digestion, whereby a 1.8 kb BamHI-BamHI fragment was gel isolated and ligated into the BamHI site of BamHI digested and alkaline phosphatase treated pC1/1 to provide plasmids PHO5GAP1 and PHO5GAP2 where the PHO5 was distal and proximal to the long pBR322sequence, respectively.

The two plasmids were transformed into yeast strain 2150-2-3 as described above and grown in rich media as described above for 8 to 10 generations in either high (7 mM) or low (0.2 mM) phosphate. Samples were harvested in late log phase and HBsAg determined as described previously. The results are shown below in Table 4.

              TABLE 4______________________________________Regulation of HBsAg Production in Yeast using aHybrid PHO5/GAPDH Promoter   High Phosphate              Low Phosphate   (7 mM)     (0.2 mM)   InductionConstruction      (sAg μg/mg protein)                         low/high______________________________________PHO5GAP-1 0.08         0.95       12.0PHO5GAP-2 0.27         0.40       1.5______________________________________

From the above results, it is evident that effective regulation with phosphate is obtained, with one orientation being superior to the other.

It is evident from the above results, that highly efficient expression can be obtained, either constitutive or regulated, by providing for truncated promoter regions of yeast glycolytic enzyme gene promoters employing the 3' domain proximal to the coding region of the gene in conjunction with a 5'-portion or second domain of the promoter region of a yeast gene subject to inducible regulation by a nutrient, e.g., carbon source or phosphate. temperature, or other externally controllable source or condition. Alternatively, the second domain may be replaced by prokaryotic sequences of at least about 1 kb or greater, which provide for constitutive enhancement in the absence of the second domain of the promoter region. Thus, a wide variety of genes exogenous to yeast may be expressed in high yield in high percentages of the total protein of the yeast host.

Although the foregoing invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding it will be obvious that certain changes and modifications my be practiced within the scope of the appended claims.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification536/24.1, 435/254.2, 435/254.21, 435/69.3, 435/320.1
International ClassificationC12N15/62, C12N15/81, C07K14/81, C07K14/02, C12N9/02
Cooperative ClassificationC12N9/0089, C07K2319/40, C07K14/005, C07K2319/75, C07K2319/00, C12N15/81, C07K14/8125, C07K2319/02, C12N2730/10122, C12N15/62
European ClassificationC07K14/005, C12N9/00P32, C12N15/62, C07K14/81B1B1, C12N15/81
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