Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE38605 E1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/866,146
Publication dateSep 28, 2004
Filing dateMay 25, 2001
Priority dateDec 11, 1997
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA2255374A1, CA2255374C, DE29822070U1, US5906549
Publication number09866146, 866146, US RE38605 E1, US RE38605E1, US-E1-RE38605, USRE38605 E1, USRE38605E1
InventorsDaniel J. Kubica, John A. Solheim
Original AssigneeKarsten Manufacturing Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club with different shaft orientations and method of making same
US RE38605 E1
Abstract
A golf club is comprised of a head including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall, and a front wall arranged for impacting a golf ball. A bore is disposed in the head adjacent a heel end thereof behind the body front wall extending downwardly from the body top wall toward the body bottom wall. A hosel having a generally lengthwise passage is inserted into the bore. The hosel passage is oriented at a predetermined angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the bore, and a tip end of a shaft is received in the hosel passage so that the shaft is disposed at a desired orientation with respect to the head. The hosel is selected from a plurality of hosels with passages disposed at different predetermined angles relative to the bore longitudinal axis. This allows adjustment of the desired orientation of the shaft so that the golf club may be custom fit to a particular golfer.
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(15)
What is claimed is:
1. A golf club in combination with a plurality of hosels wherein each of said hosels has a passage extending generally lengthwise thereof, said passage being disposed at a different predetermined angle for each of said hosels, said golf club comprising:
a head including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall, and a front wall arranged for impacting a golf ball, said head further including a heel end and a toe end, said head also having a bore disposed in said heel end behind said front wall extending downwardly from said body top wall toward said body bottom wall, said bore having a longitudinal axis and a top end flush with said body top wall, said head being made of a first material having an associated shear modulus of elasticity;
a hosel selected from said plurality of hosels inserted into said bore, said selected hosel being made of a second material having an associated shear modulus of elasticity lower than that of said first material for causing said selected hosel to absorb shock resulting from said head striking a golf ball on said body front wall and having an outer surface which mates with said head so as to position said hosel relative to said bore, said hosel passage being oriented at a selected angle relative to said longitudinal axis of said bore;
a shaft having a tip end received in said selected hosel passage and extending through said hosel passage into said bore below said body top wall, said shaft being disposed at a desired orientation with respect to said head; and
said selected hosel providing the desired orientation of said shaft with respect to said head and extending unsupported by said head above said body top wall.
2. The golf club of claim 1 wherein said hollow body further includes a sidewall connecting said top and bottom walls.
3. The golf club of claim 1, wherein said bore has a top end which is open and a bottom end which is closed.
4. The golf club of claim 3, wherein said bore top end is substantially flush with said body top wall and wherein said bore bottom end is spaced from said body bottom wall.
5. The golf club of claim 1, wherein said hosel has a lower portion received in said bore and an upper portion extending upwardly from said body top wall.
6. A method of making a golf club comprising the steps of:
forming a head having a heel end to a toe and wherein said head includes a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall, and a front wall arranged for impacting a golf ball, said head being made of a first material having an associated shear modulus of elasticity;
forming a bore having a longitudinal axis in said heel end of said head being said front face having a longitudinal axis and a top end flush with said top wall so that said bore extends downwardly from said top wall toward said bottom wall;
providing a plurality of hosels wherein each of said hosels has is made of a second material having an associated shear modules of elasticity lower than that of said first material for causing said selected hosel to absorb shock resulting from said head striking a golf ball on said front wall and having an outer surface which mates with said head so as to position said hosel relative to said bore, each of said hosels having a passage extending generally lengthwise thereof and disposed at a predetermined angle, said predetermined angle being different for each of said hosels;
selecting a hosel from said plurality of hosels;
inserting said selected hosel into said bore so that its passage is oriented at a selected angle relative to said longitudinal axis of said bore and so that it extends unsupported by said head above said top wall of said head; and
inserting a tip end of a shaft into said bore below said top wall of said head through said passage of said selected hosel so that said shaft is disposed at a desired orientation with respect to said head.
7. The golf club of claim 1, wherein said hosel is made of plastic.
8. The golf club of claim 7, wherein said head is made of titanium.
9. The golf club of claim 1, wherein said head is made of titanium.
10. The golf club of claim 1, wherein a front wall of said bore is spaced from said front wall of said body of said head.
11. A golf club in combination with a plurality of hosels wherein each of said hosels has a passage extending generally lengthwise thereof, said passage being disposed at a different angle for each of said hosels, said golf club including a shaft, a head and a hosel selected from said plurality of hosels inserted in a bore in said head, with an end of said shaft inserted in said selected hosel, wherein said head comprises a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall, and a front wall arranged for impacting a golf ball, said bore having a top end which is substantially flush with said body top wall and a bottom end which is spaced from said body bottom wall, said head further including a heel end and a toe end and a wall structure disposed in said heel end and defining said bore, said wall structure extending downwardly from said body top wall toward said body bottom wall and having a front side which is spaced apart from a rear side of said front wall of said body for disposing said bore in a position with said bottom end above said body bottom wall and rearwardly away from said rear side of said front wall while supporting said shaft above said bottom wall with said selected hosel which extends unsupported by said head above said body top wall.
12. A golf club as in claim 11, wherein said bore top end is open and said bore bottom end is closed.
13. A golf club as in claim 11, wherein said selected hosel inserted in said bore has said passage oriented at an angle relative to a longitudinal axis of said bore, wherein said bore is shaped so as to establish a fixed angular position of said hosel passage relative to said bore longitudinal axis when said selected hosel is inserted in said bore.
14. A golf club as in claim 11, wherein said passage of said selected hosel has a longitudinal axis which is at an angle relative to a longitudinal axis of said bore.
15. A golf club as in claim 11, wherein each of said hosels is made of plastic and said head is made of titanium.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to golf clubs and, in particular, to a golf club commonly referred to as a “metal wood”.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,232,224 to R. Zeider discloses a metal wood having a shaft attached to a head by a hosel tube. The shaft may be positioned in different orientations with respect to the head by repositioning the hosel tube relative to the head. This repositioning of the hosel tube is accomplished by providing an opening in the head through which the hosel tube passes that is larger than the hosel tube. The hosel tube is titled into a desired position and then welded to the head. Thus, shaft orientation may be adjusted.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a golf club comprised of a head including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall, and a front wall arranged form impacting a golf ball. The head further includes a heel end and a toe end, the head also has a bore disposed in the heel end behind the body front wall extending downwardly from the body top wall toward the body bottom wall. The bore has a longitudinal axis. A hosel is inserted into the bore. The hosel has a passage extending generally lengthwise thereof. The passage is oriented at a predetermined angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the bore. A shaft has a tip end received in the hosel passage. The shaft is disposed at a desired orientation with respect to the head. The hosel is selected from a plurality of hosels with passages disposed at different predetermined angles relative to the longitudinal axis of the bore so that the desired orientation of the shaft with respect to the head may be adjusted.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf club, partially broken away, according to the present invention;

FIG. 1a is a perspective view of the head of the golf club shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 1b is a front elevational view of the head shown in FIG. 1a;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the golf club shown in FIG. 1 with the shaft removed;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along lines 33 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the hosel used in the golf club shown in FIGS. 1-3;

FIG. 5 is a front elevational view of the hosel shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a side elevation view of the hosel shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a rear elevational view of the hosel shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along lines 88 in FIG. 5;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along lines 99 in FIG. 1b;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along lines 1010 in FIG. 1b;

FIG. 11 is a rear elevational view of another embodiment of the hosel shown in FIGS. 1a and 1b;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken along lines 1212 in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along lines 1313 in FIG. 11;

FIG. 14 is a another sectional view similar to FIG. 3 with the shaft oriented in different lie angle positions;

FIG. 15 is another top plan view similar to FIG. 2 of the golf club shown in FIG. 1 with the shaft oriented in different progression angle positions;

FIGS. 16 and 17 illustrate pluralities of hosels with their passages disposed at different predetermined angles.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring to FIG. 1, a golf club 10 incorporating the present invention includes a head 12, a hosel 14 and a shaft 16. Head 12 is comprised of a hollow body 18 made of a first material such as titanium having a high shear modulus of elasticity. The hollow body 18 has a top wall 20, a bottom wall 22, a side wall 24 connecting the top and side walls 20 and 22, and a front wall 26 arranged for impacting a golf ball. Further, the head 12 has a heel end 12a and a toe end 12b.

A bore 28 is provided in the heel end 12a of the head 12 extending downwardly from the body top wall 20 toward the body bottom wall 22. The bore 28 has a top end 28a which is open and a bottom 28b which is closed. As seen in FIG. 3, the top end 28a of the bore 28 is substantially flush with the top wall 20 of the body 18, and the bore bottom end 28b is spaced from the bottom wall 22 of the body 18. The bore 28 has a longitudinal axis 29 and is defined by a lateral wall 30 connected with the side wall 24 of the body 18, and an end wall 32 connected with the lateral wall 30.

The hosel 14 is formed of a second material such as plastic having a low shear modulus of elasticity. Hosel 14 includes an upper portion 34 that extends upwardly from the top wall 20 of the body 18 and a lower portion 36 that is inserted into the bore 28. The upper and lower hosel portions 34, 36 are separated by a parting line 38. The hosel 14 also has a passage 40 extending generally lengthwise through its upper and lower portions 34, 36. When the golf club 10 is assembled as shown in FIG. 3, the hosel 14 contacts the bottom end 32 of the bore 28.

The shaft 16 is made of a third material, preferably graphite, having a low shear modulus of elasticity. Shaft 16 has a tip end 17 received in the hosel passage 40. The shaft tip end 17 extends completely through the hosel 14 and contacts the bottom end 32 of the hole 28. In the preferred embodiment of the golf club 10, the shaft modulus of elasticity of the hosel 14 is much closer to the shear elastic modulus of the shaft 16 than to the shear elastic modulus of the head 120. This relationship of elastic moduli causes the hosel 14 to absorb much of the shock resulting from the head 12 striking a golf ball on the front face 26. Therefore, less shock is transmitted to the shaft 16 which prevents breakage of the shaft 16 and permits the shaft 16 to have a weaker tip end 17 which reduces costs.

Referring to FIGS. 4-8, it is seen that the lower portion 36 of the hosel 14 has an irregular outside shape defined by a generally arcuate surface 15a covering its front and sides, and a generally flat surface 15b covering its back. The bore 28 in the head 12 has a complementary irregular inside shape defined by a generally arcuate surface 28c and a generally flat surface 28b. Therefore, the hosel 14 may be inserted into the bore 28 is only one orientation which ensures exact alignment of the shaft 16 relative to the head 12. In that orientation, the generally arcuate surfaces 15a; 28a of the hosel 14 and the bore 28 mate with each other, and the generally flat surfaces 15b, 28b of the hosel 14 and the bore 28 also mate with each other.

Since the hosel 14 is made of softer material than the head 12, the hosel 14 has a cushioning effect on the shaft 16. This cushioning effect significantly reduces the amount of vibration that is transmitted to the shaft 16 which increases shaft life.

Referring to FIGS. 8-10, it will be understood that the front wall 26 of the body 18 is reinforced by providing it with increased thickness near its geometric center C. The front wall 26 varies in thickness in a first plane A that is disposed substantially horizontally between the top and bottom walls 20, 22 of the body 18. The front wall 26 also varies in thickness in a second plane B that is disposed substantially vertically between the head heel and the toe ends 12a, 12b.

As seen in FIGS. 9 and 10, the front wall 26 has increased thickness along an axis X where the planes A and B intersect. Since this axis X extends through the geometric center C of the front wall 26, the increased thickness of the front wall 26 is greatest at the geometric center C. The front wall increased thickness gradually decreases in a first direction extending from the axis X to the top wall 20, in a second direction extending from the axis X to the bottom wall 22, in a third direction extending from the axis X to the heel end 12a, and in a fourth direction extending from the axis X to the toe end 12b.

The head front wall 26 has a first thickness dimension T1 at its geometric center C, a second thickness dimension T2 adjacent the heel and toe ends 12a, 12b, and a third thickness dimension T3 adjacent the top and bottom walls 20, 22. The thickness dimension T1 is greater than the thickness dimensions T2 and T3; and the thickness dimensions T2 and T3 may be equal. In the preferred embodiment, the thickness dimensions T1 is between 0.130 and 0.180 inch, the thickness dimension T2 is between 0.040 and 0.125 inch, and the thickness dimension T3 is between 0.040 and 0.125 inch.

By reinforcing the front wall 26 with the increased thickness T1 as described above, front wall 276 is strengthened at its geometric center C where loading is the greatest when impacting a golf ball. Also, by providing the front wall 26 with the decreased thickness dimensions T2 and T3, mass is redistributed to other parts of the head 12 to enhance performance of the golf club 10.

Referring to FIGS. 11-13, another embodiment of the head 12 is shown wherein the side wall 24 of the hollow body 18 has a recess 42 formed therein between the heel and toe ends 12a, 12b substantially opposite the front wall 26. The recess 42 has a continuous side wall 42a and an end wall 42b. A back weighting member 44 having a predetermined volume is disposed in the recess 42. The back weighting member 44 is selected from a plurality of back weighting members (not shown) that have the same predetermined volume but have different densities and thus different weights. Therefore, the desired weight of the body 18 may be adjusted without changing the predetermined volume of the back weighting member 44. By selecting a back weighting member 44 of the proper weight, manufacturing tolerances can be overcome and swingweight of the golf club 10 may be adjusted in a simple effective manner. The back weighting member 44 is preferably formed of a suitable plastic with metal fillers.

As seen in FIG. 14, the golf club 10 may be custom fit to a particular golfer by positioning the shaft 16 in a desired orientation 16a with respect to the head 12 which is commonly known as shaft lie angle. In this shaft orientation 16a, the hosel passage 40 is disposed at a predetermined angle relative to the longitudinal axis 29 of the bore 28 The shaft orientation 16a is provided by using the hosel 14a (FIG. 16) and is considered a standard lie angle position in relation to the ground G. The hosel 14a is selected from a plurality of hosels 14a, 14b, 14c shown in FIG. 16 that will have their passages 40 disposed at different predetermined angles relative to the bore longitudinal axis 29 when inserted into the bore 28. If a golfer desired a shaft orientation that is more upright in relation to the ground G such as shown at 16b in FIG. 14, a different hosel 14b is selected from those seen in FIG. 16 that has its passage 40 disposed at a more upright angle relative to the longitudinal axis 29 of the bore 28. Conversely, if a golfer desires a shaft orientation that is less upright in relation to the ground G such as shown at 16c in FIG. 14, another hosel 14c is selected from those seen in FIG. 16 that has its passage 40 disposed at a less upright angle relative to the bore longitudinal axis 29

Referring to FIG. 15, it will be understood that the golf club 10 may also be customized by positioning the shaft 16 in a further desired orientation 16d with respect to the head 12 which is known as shaft progression angle. In this shaft orientation 16d, the hosel passage 40 is disposed at another predetermined angle relative to the longitudinal axis 29 of the bore 28. The shaft orientation 16d is provided by using the hosel 14d (FIG. 17) and is considered a neutral progression angle position in relation to the leading edge 27 of the front face 26. If a golfer desired a shaft orientation that is tilted forwardly such as shown at 16e in FIG. 15, a different hosel 14e is selected from those seen in FIG. 17 that has its passage 40 positioned at a forward angle relative to the bore longitudinal axis 29. Conversely, if a golfer desires a shaft orientation that is tilted rearwardly such as shown at 16f in FIG. 15, another hosel 14f is selected from those seen in FIG. 17 that has its passage 40 positioned at a rearward angle relative to the longitudinal axis 29 of the bore 28.

Many different hosels 14 may be utilized in the golf club 10 to orient the shaft 16 in many different lie angle positions and in many different progression angle positions. This is accomplished by providing hosels 14 that have their passages 40 located at different predetermined angles with respect to the bore longitudinal axis 29 when the hosels 14 are inserted into the bore 28. For example, a hosel 14 may be used that positions the shaft 16 in the combined orientations 16a and 16d. Another hosel 14 may be used that positions the shaft 16 in the combined orientations 16a and 16e. A further hosel 14 may be used that positions the shaft 16 in the combined orientations 16a and 16f. Still other hosels 14 may be used that position the shaft 16 in the following combined orientations: 16b and 16d; 16b and 16e; 16b and 16f; 16c and 16d; 16c and 16e; 16c and 16f.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1133129Mar 6, 1913Mar 23, 1915James GovanGolf-club.
US1167106Jun 11, 1914Jan 4, 1916Oliver M PalmerGolf-club.
US1538312Feb 21, 1925May 19, 1925Beat William NeishGolf club
US1562956Mar 23, 1925Nov 24, 1925Guerne Alfred AGolf-club head
US1840924Mar 11, 1930Jan 12, 1932Tucker Errol EGolf club
US2067556 *Oct 29, 1935Jan 12, 1937Wettlaufer William LGolf club
US2219670Jan 25, 1939Oct 29, 1940Wettlaufer William LGolf club
US2460435Apr 23, 1948Feb 1, 1949Fred B SchafferGolf club
US2809838Aug 18, 1953Oct 15, 1957Plastic Golf Products IncGolf club head
US3064980Sep 7, 1960Nov 20, 1962James V SteinerVariable golf club head
US3572709Oct 14, 1968Mar 30, 1971Risher John DGolf club construction
US3810621Sep 18, 1972May 14, 1974Mills THosel-less wood type golf club
US3829092 *Jul 5, 1972Aug 13, 1974Arkin TSet of golf clubs and means for carrying same
US4417731Jun 16, 1982Nov 29, 1983Kunio YamadaHollow metal golf club head and club incorporating it
US4511145Jul 18, 1983Apr 16, 1985Schmidt Glenn HReinforced hollow metal golf club head
US4854583Jan 13, 1989Aug 8, 1989Maruman Golf Co., Ltd.Construction of portion connecting golf club-head and golf club shaft
US4869507Jun 25, 1987Sep 26, 1989Players Golf, Inc.Golf club
US4943059Jun 3, 1988Jul 24, 1990Salomon, S.A.Golf club having removable head
US4948132 *Feb 13, 1989Aug 14, 1990Wharton Norman WGolf club
US4957294May 13, 1988Sep 18, 1990Macgregor Golf CompanyGolf club head
US4984794May 2, 1989Jan 15, 1991Salomon S.A.Golf club capable of selective angle modification between the shaft and head, and method of assembling the golf club
US5028049Oct 30, 1989Jul 2, 1991Mckeighen James FGolf club head
US5042806Dec 29, 1989Aug 27, 1991Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club with neckless metal head
US5058895Sep 1, 1989Oct 22, 1991Igarashi Lawrence YGolf club with improved moment of inertia
US5067715Oct 16, 1990Nov 26, 1991Callaway Golf CompanyHollow, metallic golf club head with dendritic structure
US5141230Aug 10, 1990Aug 25, 1992Antonious A JMetal wood golf club head with improved weighting system
US5163682Sep 4, 1991Nov 17, 1992Callaway Golf CompanyMetal wood golf club with variable faceplate thickness
US5184819Oct 31, 1990Feb 9, 1993Jacques DesbiollesGolf club
US5197733 *Dec 24, 1990Mar 30, 1993Schroder Edward WGolf club
US5207428Dec 19, 1991May 4, 1993Daiwa Golf Co., Ltd.Golf club head
US5219408Mar 2, 1992Jun 15, 1993Sun Donald J COne-body precision cast metal wood
US5232224 *Aug 18, 1992Aug 3, 1993Zeider Robert LGolf club head and method of manufacture
US5244211Apr 7, 1992Sep 14, 1993Ram Golf CorporationGolf club and method of manufacture
US5255914Aug 31, 1992Oct 26, 1993Schroder Edward WGolf club
US5261663Dec 13, 1991Nov 16, 1993Donald A. AndersonGolf club head and method of forming same
US5310186Mar 17, 1993May 10, 1994Karsten Manufacturing CorporationGolf club head with weight pad
US5335909 *Apr 16, 1993Aug 9, 1994Green Jr RobertWood head no hosel golf club
US5380010Oct 28, 1993Jan 10, 1995Frank D. WernerGolf club head construction
US5429357Apr 5, 1993Jul 4, 1995Kabushiki Kaisha Endo SeisakushoGolf clubhead and its method of manufacturing
US5452890Mar 7, 1994Sep 26, 1995Bingman; GeorgeGolf club head having protecting insert
US5513844 *Nov 29, 1994May 7, 1996Goldwin Golf U.S.A., Inc.Golf club fitting apparatus
US5538246 *Apr 17, 1995Jul 23, 1996Daiwa Seiko, Inc.Golf club
US5542666Jan 13, 1995Aug 6, 1996Acushnet CompanyInsertable hosel extension for varying offset and inset of golf clubs
US5547427Feb 26, 1993Aug 20, 1996Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head having a hollow plastic body and a metallic sealing element
US5575723Mar 15, 1995Nov 19, 1996Daiwa Seiko, Inc.Golf club with cushion material between shaft and head
US5586948Apr 24, 1995Dec 24, 1996Mick; Phillip J.Metal wood golf club head
US5626528Jan 26, 1996May 6, 1997Zevo Golf, Inc.Golf club head and hosel construction
US5720674Apr 30, 1996Feb 24, 1998Taylor Made Golf Co.Golf club head
US5766094Jun 7, 1996Jun 16, 1998Lisco Inc.Face inserts for golf club heads
US5776011Sep 27, 1996Jul 7, 1998Echelon GolfGolf club head
US5839973Nov 8, 1996Nov 24, 1998Jackson; AlGolf club head with enlarged hosel
US5851155Sep 4, 1997Dec 22, 1998Zevo Golf Co., Inc.Hosel construction and method of making the same
US5954596Dec 4, 1997Sep 21, 1999Karsten Manufacturing CorporationGolf club head with reinforced front wall
USRE35931Oct 25, 1995Oct 20, 1998Schroder; Edward W.Golf club
CN1396080AJul 4, 2002Feb 12, 2003现代自动车株式会社Support device for boot space tailgate of automobile
GB751323A Title not available
GB1271854A Title not available
GB2197209A Title not available
GB2207358A Title not available
GB2241173A Title not available
WO1988003427A1Nov 6, 1987May 19, 1988Xcalibre Sport LimitedA golf club
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1Affadavit of Daniel James Kubica dated May 15, 2001. U.S.A.
2Affidavit of Peter Joseph Shanks dated Jun. 19, 2002. UK.
3Order Granting Plaintiff's Motion for Partial Summary Judgement filed Jul 12, 2001, Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Manufacturing Corp., Case No. 99-CV-2310H in the United States District Court of the Southern District of California.
4Petron Gold Equipment 15<th >Anniversary Pro Only Price list, Dec. 1, 1988. UK.
5Petron Gold Equipment 15th Anniversary Pro Only Price list, Dec. 1, 1988. UK.
6Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Brief for Defendants-Cross Appellants".
7Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Corrected Brief of Plaintiff-Appellant Zevo Golf".
8Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Reply Brief of Plaintiff-Appellant Zevo Golf Company, Inc.".
9Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Repy Brief for Defendants-Cross Appellants"-Non-Confidential Version.
10Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Brief for Defendants—Cross Appellants".
11Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Corrected Brief of Plaintiff—Appellant Zevo Golf".
12Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Reply Brief of Plaintiff—Appellant Zevo Golf Company, Inc.".
13Zevo Golf Co., Inc. v. Karsten Mfg. Corp., et al., "Repy Brief for Defendants—Cross Appellants"—Non-Confidential Version.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7736243 *Feb 14, 2008Jun 15, 2010Karsten Manufacturing CoporationGolf club attachment mechanisms and methods to attach golf clubs
US7887431Feb 15, 2011Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US7934999May 3, 2011Callaway Golf CompanyWood-type golf club head with adjustable sole contour
US8025587Dec 30, 2008Sep 27, 2011Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8142307Jun 24, 2009Mar 27, 2012Karsten Manufacturing CorporationGolf club attachment mechanisms and methods to attach golf clubs
US8147350Mar 31, 2011Apr 3, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8177661May 15, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8235831Sep 1, 2011Aug 7, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8262498Jan 6, 2011Sep 11, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8303429Jan 22, 2010Nov 6, 2012Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club with stable face angle
US8303431Nov 6, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8337319Dec 23, 2009Dec 25, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8360897Jul 18, 2011Jan 29, 2013Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8376874Feb 19, 2013Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8398503Jun 20, 2012Mar 19, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8496541Nov 28, 2011Jul 30, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8517855Nov 28, 2011Aug 27, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8517856Aug 6, 2012Aug 27, 2013Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8523701Aug 12, 2011Sep 3, 2013Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8602907Sep 12, 2012Dec 10, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8622847May 29, 2009Jan 7, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8696487Sep 7, 2012Apr 15, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8727900Mar 11, 2013May 20, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8727905Aug 12, 2011May 20, 2014Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8747248Aug 12, 2011Jun 10, 2014Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8758153Jun 22, 2011Jun 24, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
US8777771Aug 6, 2012Jul 15, 2014Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8801538Aug 30, 2013Aug 12, 2014Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8845450Jun 26, 2013Sep 30, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8852020Aug 23, 2013Oct 7, 2014Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US8876627Jul 3, 2013Nov 4, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club
US8961330Dec 20, 2012Feb 24, 2015Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US9033821Nov 27, 2012May 19, 2015Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf clubs
US9072949 *May 31, 2012Jul 7, 2015Nike, Inc.Golf clubs and golf club heads having interchangeable rear body members
US9174096Jul 19, 2013Nov 3, 2015Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
US9216331Mar 14, 2013Dec 22, 2015Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head with adjustable sole
US9259625Mar 15, 2013Feb 16, 2016Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
US9259626May 15, 2014Feb 16, 2016Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US9278262 *Jul 31, 2013Mar 8, 2016Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
US9327171Aug 11, 2014May 3, 2016Acushnet CompanyInterchangeable shaft system
US20090181791 *Jul 16, 2009Sanchez Richard RGolf Club Attachment Mechanisms And Methods To Attach Golf Clubs
US20110003648 *Jun 24, 2009Jan 6, 2011Sanchez Richard RGolf Club Attachment Mechanisms And Methods To Attach Golf Clubs
US20110039637 *Feb 17, 2011Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club with stable face angle
US20130040755 *May 31, 2012Feb 14, 2013Nike, Inc.Golf Clubs and Golf Club Heads Having Interchangeable Rear Body Members
US20140080622 *Jul 31, 2013Mar 20, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
USD697155Nov 15, 2012Jan 7, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/314, 473/248
International ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B53/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2053/0458, A63B53/04, A63B53/02, A63B2053/0462, A63B53/0466
European ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B53/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 17, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: KARSTEN MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, ARIZONA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SOLHEIM, JOHN A.;REEL/FRAME:014600/0817
Effective date: 20031013
Nov 27, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Nov 24, 2010FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12