Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE39698 E1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 10/761,097
Publication dateJun 26, 2007
Filing dateJan 20, 2004
Priority dateJan 29, 2001
Fee statusPaid
Publication number10761097, 761097, US RE39698 E1, US RE39698E1, US-E1-RE39698, USRE39698 E1, USRE39698E1
InventorsWilliam L. Grilliot, Mary I. Grilliot
Original AssigneeMorning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective garment adapted to be selectively configured
US RE39698 E1
Abstract
A protective garment comprises an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance and puncture resistance, a thermal liner, and a liner including a moisture barrier. Each liner being adapted to be separately and detachably attached to and within the outer shell. The garment is adapted to be selectively configured with neither said liner so attached or with the thermal liner so attached, for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire, with both said liners so attached, for a firefighter fighting a structural fire, or with the liner including the moisture barrier so attached, for a firefighter engaging in a technical rescue.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(5)
1. A protective garment comprising an outer shell and two liners, each said liner being attached to and within the outer shell by means permitting said same liner to be detached from the outer shell while permitting but not requiring the other liner to be detached from the outer shell, so that the garment is selectively configured, with either one of said liners so attached, or with both said liners so attached.
2. A protective garment comprising an outer shell, a thermal liner, and a separate liner, which includes a moisture barrier, each said liner being attached to and within the outer shell by means permitting said same liner to be detached from the outer shell while permitting but not requiring the other liner to be detached from the outer shell, so that the garment is selectively configured, with one said liner so attached, or with both said liners so attached.
3. A protective garment comprising an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance, puncture resistance, or both, a thermal liner, and a separate liner, which includes a moisture barrier, each said liner being attached to and within the outer shell by means permitting said same liner to be detached from the outer shell while permitting but not requiring the other liner to be detached from the outer shell, so that the garment is selectively configured, with one said liner so attached, or with both said liners so attached.
4. A protective garment that can be selectively configured so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire, for a firefighter fighting a structural fire, or for a worker engaging in a technical rescue, the garment comprising an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance, puncture resistance, or both, a thermal liner, and a separate liner, which includes a moisture barrier, each said liner being attached to and within the outer shell by means permitting said same liner to be detached from the outer shell while permitting but not requiring the other liner to be detached from the outer shell, so that the garment is selectively configured with the thermal liner so attached, so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire, with both said liners so attached, so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a structural fire, or with the separate liner including the moisture barrier so attached, so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter engaging in a technical rescue.
5. A protective garment comprising an outer shell and two liners, each said liner being attached within the outer shell and being detachable from within the outer shell while permitting but not requiring the other liner to be detached from within the outer shell, so that the garment is selectively configured, with either one of said liners so attached, or with both said liners so attached.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention pertains to a protective garment, such as a protective garment for a firefighter, which has an outer shell and which can be selectively configured so as to have no liner, one liner, or two liners. Herein, all references to protective garments are to be broadly construed to refer to pants, coats, jackets, overalls, and coveralls.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has promulgated standards—see NFPA 1971 Standard on Protective Ensemble for Structural Firefighting (2000 Edition)—for protective clothing for firefighters fighting structural fires. The National Fire Protection Association has promulgated standards—see NFPA 1977 Standard on Protective Clothing and Equipment for Wildland Firefighting (1998 Edition)—for protective clothing for firefighters engaged in fighting wildland fires. Presently, the National Fire Protection Association is contemplating standards for protective clothing for firefighters engaging in what are known as technical rescues, such as extracting victims from automobile wrecks.

As contemplated by the aforenoted standards for protective clothing for firefighters fighting structural fires, a protective garment has an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance and puncture resistance, a liner including a moisture barrier, and a thermal liner. Conventionally, as known heretofore, the liner including the moisture barrier and the thermal liner are sewn together or are bonded together, and the sewn-together or bonded-together liners are attached detachably to and within the outer shell by suitable fasteners, such as zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, and snap fasteners. Thus, if the moisture barrier fails while the thermal liner remains useful, the liner including the moisture barrier cannot be easily replaced, apart from the thermal liner.

Alternatively, as known heretofore, the liner including the moisture barrier is sewn to and within the outer shell and the thermal liner is attached detachably to the outer shell, within the liner including the moisture barrier. Thus, if the moisture barrier fails while the outer shell remains useful, the moisture barrier cannot be easily replaced, apart from the outer shell.

As contemplated by the aforenoted standards for protective clothing for firefighters fighting wildland fires, a protective garment has an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance and puncture resistance. Although a liner including a moisture barrier and a thermal liner are not needed, a thermal liner may be optionally included, as for wearing under cold winter conditions. If a thermal liner is included, the thermal liner is attached detachably to and within the outer shell by suitable fasteners, such as zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, or snap fasteners.

The aforenoted standards contemplated for protective garments for firefighters engaging in technical rescues are expected to provide that a protective garment has an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance and puncture resistance, and a liner including a moisture barrier. Furthermore, the contemplated standards are expected to permit the liner including the moisture barrier to be detachably attached to and within the outer shell by suitable fasteners, such as zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, or snap fasteners.

Protective garments conforming to the aforenoted standards for protective clothing for firefighters fighting structural fires and protective garments conforming to the aforenoted standards for protective clothing for firefighters fighting wildland fires are available commercially from Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C. of Dayton, Ohio, and from other sources.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Broadly, this invention provided a protective garment comprising an outer shell and two liners. Each said liner is adapted to be separately and detachably attached to and within the outer shell. The garment is adapted to be selectively configured with neither said liner so attached, with either one of said liners so attached, or with both said liners so attached. Preferably, one such liner is a thermal liner and the other liner includes a moisture barrier. Preferably, moreover, the outer shell provides abrasion resistance, puncture resistance, or both.

Specifically, this invention provides a protective garment that can be selectively configured so as to be particularly suited for a liner fighting a wildland fire, for a firefighter fighting a structural fire, or for a worker engaging in a technical rescue. Thus, the garment comprises an outer shell, which provides abrasion resistance, puncture resistance, or both, a thermal liner, and a separate liner, which includes a moisture barrier. Each said liner is adapted to be separately and detachably attached to and within the outer shell.

Specifically, moreover, the garment is adapted to be selectively configured with neither said liner so attached or with the thermal liner so attached, so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire, with both said liners so attached, so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a structural fire, or with the separate liner including the moisture barrier so attached, so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter engaging in a technical rescue.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A is a fragmentary, sectional, exploded view of a protective garment embodying this invention in a first embodiment configured with an outer shell, with a thermal liner, and with a liner including a moisture barrier. The liner including the moisture barrier is interposed between the outer shell and the thermal liner so that the moisture barrier faces the outer shell.

FIG. 1B is a fragmentary, sectional, exploded view of a protective garment embodying this invention in a second embodiment configured with an outer shell, with a thermal liner, and with a liner including a moisture barrier. The liner including the moisture barrier is interposed between the outer shell and the thermal liner so that the moisture barrier faces the thermal liner.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, sectional, exploded view of a protective garment embodying this invention in a third embodiment comprising and being configured with an outer shell and with a liner including a moisture barrier but not with a thermal liner. The liner including the moisture barrier is disposed so that the moisture barrier faces the outer shell.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, sectional, exploded view of a protective garment embodying this invention in a fourth embodiment comprising and being configured with an outer shell and with a thermal liner but not with a liner including a moisture barrier.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view of a protective garment embodying this invention in a fifth embodiment configured with an outer shell but not with a thermal liner and not with a liner including a moisture barrier.

FIGS. 5A, 5B and 5C and FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C are fragmentary, sectional, exploded, views of the protective garment of FIG. 1A, wherein the liners are attached detachably to the outer shell by zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, and snap fasteners respectively.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS

As illustrated in FIG. 1A, a protective garment comprising an outer shell 10, a thermal liner 20, and a separate liner 30 is configured so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a structural fire. The outer shell 10 is woven from fibers, e.g. Kevlar™ fibers, which provide abrasion resistance and puncture resistance. The thermal liner 20 has a fibrous matrix 22, which is disposed between an inner cover 24 and an outer cover 26. The covers 24, 26, may be woven or non-woven and are quilted so as to segregate discrete regions of the fibrous matrix 22.

The separate liner 30, which is interposed between the outer shell 10 and the thermal liner 20, has a fabric matrix 32 and a moisture barrier 34, e.g. a neoprene layer, which is laminated to the fabric matrix 32, on an outer surface 36 of the fabric matrix 32. The outer surface 36 faces the outer shell 10. An inner surface 38 of the fabric matrix 32 faces the outer cover 26 of the thermal liner 20.

As illustrated in FIG. 1B, a liner 30a including a moisture barrier 34a is substituted for the liner 30 in the protective garment. The liner 30a has a fabric matrix 32a, which is similar to the fabric matrix 32 of the liner 30, which has an outer surface 36a facing the outer shell 10, and on an inner surface 38a of which the moisture barrier 34a, e.g. a Breathe TeX™ layer, is coated.

As illustrated in FIG. 2, the protective garment is configured so as to be particularly suited for a liner engaging in a technical rescue. As compared to the protective garment in its configuration illustrated in FIG. 1A, the thermal liner 20 is omitted, whereas the liner 30 including the moisture barrier 34 is included. In an alternative embodiment, which is not to illustrated, the liner 30a including the moisture barrier 34a is substituted for the liner 30 including the moisture barrier 34.

As illustrated in FIG. 3, the protective garment is configured so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire under cold winter conditions. As compared to the protective garment in its configuration illustrated in FIG. 1A, the liner 30 including the moisture barrier 32 is omitted, whereas the thermal liner 20 is included. In an alternative embodiment, which is not illustrated, the protective garment has two thermal liners, each similar to the thermal liner 20 and each attached similarly to the outer shell 10, whereby the protective garment is configured so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire under severely cold conditions. As illustrated in FIG. 4, the thermal liner 20 can be also omitted, whereby the protective garment is configured so as to be particularly suited for a firefighter fighting a wildland fire under comparatively warmer conditions.

In FIG. 5A, zippers 40 are used to attach the liner 30 including the moisture barrier 34 detachably to the outer shell 10 and to attach the thermal liner 20 detachably to the liner 30 including the moisture barrier 34, whereby the thermal liner 20 is considered to be detachably, albeit indirectly, to the outer shell 10. In FIG. 5B, hook-and-loop fasteners (e.g. VELCRO™ fasteners) are used where zippers 40 are used in FIG. 5A. In FIG. 5C, snap fasteners 60 are used where zippers 40 are used in FIG. 5A.

In FIG. 6A, zippers 40 are used to the liner 30 including the moisture barrier 34 detachably to the outer shell 10 and to attach the thermal liner 20 detachably, here directly, to the outer shell 10. In FIG. 6B, hook-and-loop fasteners (e.g. VELCRO™ fasteners) are used where zippers 40 are used in FIG. 6A. In FIG. 6C, snap fasteners 60 are used where zippers 40 are used in FIG. 6A.

Because the liner including the moisture barrier is detachable from the outer shell, apart from the outer shell and apart from the thermal liner, the liner including the moisture barrier can be easily replaced, if the moisture barrier fails while the outer shell and the thermal liner remain useful.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4502153 *Aug 30, 1982Mar 5, 1985Lion Uniform, Inc.Apparel liner
US4768233 *Nov 6, 1987Sep 6, 1988Grilliot William LFirefighter's garments having removable but detectable liner
US4999850 *Dec 26, 1989Mar 19, 1991Grilliot William LFirefighter's integrated garment
US5136723 *Feb 15, 1991Aug 11, 1992Lion Apparel, Inc.Firefighter garment with mesh liner
US5189737 *Aug 5, 1991Mar 2, 1993Ramwear, Inc.Fireman's turnout coat
US5685015Jun 5, 1995Nov 11, 1997Lion Apparel, Inc.Multi-use hazardous duty garment
US5884332Jun 23, 1998Mar 23, 1999Globe Manufacturing CompanyFirefighter garment with liner inspection system
US5920905 *May 7, 1997Jul 13, 1999Lion Apparel, Inc.Firefighter garment with combination facecloth and moisture barrier
US5933865 *Jul 29, 1997Aug 10, 1999Lion Apparel, Inc.Multi-use hazardous duty garment
US20020174476May 25, 2001Nov 28, 2002Marcanada Inc.Firefighter protective garment having a liner with a separable moisture barrier
US20030110553Dec 13, 2001Jun 19, 2003Donald AldridgeHazardous duty garment with separable moisture barrier and thermal barrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/97, 2/81
International ClassificationA41D13/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 18, 2013FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Jun 22, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8