Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE40436 E1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/176,878
Publication dateJul 15, 2008
Filing dateJul 7, 2005
Priority dateAug 1, 2001
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS6589625
Publication number11176878, 176878, US RE40436 E1, US RE40436E1, US-E1-RE40436, USRE40436 E1, USRE40436E1
InventorsManish Kothari, Clarence Chui
Original AssigneeIdc, Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hermetic seal and method to create the same
US RE40436 E1
Abstract
An electronic display screen is created by processing a mirror on a substrate glass. A back plate glass is then placed on top of the substrate glass and sealed to the back plate glass. A hermetic seal that includes an adhesive mixed with zeolites is disclosed. The hermetic seal can seal the back plate glass with the substrate glass. The application of the hermetic seal is not limited to the electronic display screen. Rather, the hermetic seal can be used to seal a variety of surfaces including metals, polymers, plastics, alloys, ceramics and the like.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(28)
1. A micro-electromechanical systems based device package comprising:
a back plate glass;
a substrate glass;
at least one mirror located between the substrate glass and the back plate glass; the at lease one mirror being configured to be actuated in an electronic display; and
a bead of an adhesive mixed with a zeolite, the adhesive applied between the back plate glass and the substrate glass; and, wherein the adhesive is applied substantially around the outer perimeter of the at least one mirror.
a mirror processed on the substrate glass.
2. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 1, including the bead being applied around the perimeter of the mirror.
3. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 1, wherein the beadadhesive acts as a hermetic seal.
4. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 1, wherein the beadadhesive traps moisture and other contaminant gases that can be harmful to the mirror.
5. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 1, wherein the micro-electromechanical systems device includes an electronic display screen.
6. A micro-electromechanical systems based(MEMS) device package comprising:
a back plate glass;
a substrate glass;
at least one MEMS structure located between the substrate glass and the back plate glass; and
a bead of an adhesive mixed with zeolites of different pore sizes, the adhesive applied between the back plate glass and the substrate glass, wherein the zeolites of different pore sizes are selected to absorb molecules of different diameters, wherein the adhesive is applied substantially around the outer perimeter of the at least one MEMS structure.
7. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 6, wherein some of the zeolites have a pore size to allow absorption of molecules having a diameter of up to ten angstroms.
8. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 6, wherein some of the zeolites have a pore size to allow absorption of molecules having a diameter of less than two angstroms.
9. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 6, wherein the pore sizes of some of the zeolites allow absorption of nitrogen and carbon dioxide molecules.
10. A micro-electromechanical systems based(MEMS) device package comprising:
a back plate glass;
a substrate glass;
at least one MEMS structure located between the substrate glass and the back plate glass, the at least one MEMS structure being configured to be actuated; and
a bead of an adhesive mixed with a zeolite, the adhesive applied between the back plate glass and the substrate glass, wherein the zeolite is selected to have a pore size which allows the zeolite to absorb a contaminant gas that is outgassed by components of the packagethe at least one MEMS structure, and wherein said pore size is up to about fifty Angstroms, wherein the adhesive is supplied substantially around the outer perimeter of the at least one MEMS structure.
11. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 10, wherein the zeolite has a pore size that allows it to absorb aromatic branched-chain hydrocarbons.
12. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 10, wherein the zeolite has a pore size that allows it to absorb hydrogen molecules.
13. The micro-electromechanical systems based device package of claim 10, wherein the zeolite has a pore size that allows it to absorb nitrogen and carbon dioxide molecules.
14. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) device, comprising:
a back plate;
a substrate;
at least one reflective MEMS device located between the substrate glass and the back plate glass; and
an adhesive mixed with a zeolite, the adhesive applied between the back plate and the substrate, wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb contaminant molecules outgassed by the at least one MEMS device, said contaminant molecules having a diameter of up to about ten angstroms, and wherein the adhesive is applied substantially around the outer perimeter of the at least one MEMS device.
15. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 14 , wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb molecules having a diameter less than about two angstroms.
16. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 14 , wherein the zeolite is selected to have a pore size between about two and three angstroms.
17. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 14 , wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb aromatic branched-chain hydrocarbons.
18. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 14 , wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb hydrogen molecules.
19. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 14 , wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb moisture molecules.
20. A micro-electromechanical systems device, comprising:
a back plate;
a substrate;
at least one mirror located between the substrate and the back plate, the at least one mirror being configured to be actuated; and
an adhesive mixed with a zeolite, the adhesive applied between the back plate and the substrate, wherein the zeolite is selected to have a pore size of about fifty angstroms, and wherein the adhesive is applied substantially around the outer perimeter of the at least one mirror.
21. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 20 , wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb nitrogen.
22. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 20 , wherein the zeolite is selected to absorb carbon dioxide.
23. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 1 , wherein the adhesive is applied as a bead between the back plate glass and the substrate glass.
24. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 6 , wherein the adhesive is applied as a bead between the back plate glass and the substrate glass.
25. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 6 , wherein the adhesive acts as a hermetic seal.
26. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 10 , wherein the adhesive is applied as a bead between the back plate glass and the substrate glass.
27. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 10 , wherein the adhesive acts as a hermetic seal.
28. The micro-electromechanical systems device of claim 1 , wherein the at least one mirror comprises a plurality of mirrors, and wherein the adhesive is applied substantially around the perimeter of the plurality of mirrors.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a hermetic seal and methods to create the same. Specifically, a functional hermetic seal is disclosed that includes an adhesive mixed with an active component that can act as an absorbing filter on a molecular level.

BACKGROUND

To create an electronic display screen, a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) based device such as a mirror is sandwiched between two glass plates: the back plate glass stand the substrate glass. The mirror is typically processed on the substrate glass. The back plate glass is then placed on top of the substrate glass to form the sandwich. The purpose of the back plate glass is to act as a viewing surface and to provide mechanical and environmental protection to the mirror. The sandwich is also referred to as the package.

The MEMS based device that is packaged in this manner is susceptible to problems associated with moisture and other harmful contaminants. The presence of moisture can cause stiction (static friction). The stiction can result because of the physical hydrogen bonding between the two glass surfaces in contact or because of the surface tension forces that result when the moisture between the two glass surfaces undergoes capillary condensation during the actuation of the MEMS based device. The presence of moisture can also cause electrochemical corrosion; for example, if the mirror includes an aluminum mirror.

The presence of harmful contaminants and moisture can pose a danger to the functioning of MEMS based device. For example, chlorine and moisture can combine to form an acidic environment that can be harmful to the MEMS based device. It is important that the package is moisture and contaminant free for the life of the device.

There are various channels by which water vapor or the contaminant can find its way inside the package. The moisture can enter the package from the environment in which the MEMS device is packaged. The moisture can permeate into the package from outside. The contaminant can be formed as a result of the outgassing of package components such as glass and polymers, especially at elevated temperatures.

In the prior art, to prevent the moisture and the contaminant from entering the package, the back plate glass and the substrate glass of the package are sealed to each other by using techniques such as welding and soldering, and by using o-rings. These prior art techniques are lacking in at least two respects. One, welding and soldering materials and o-rings occupy space. Real estate in MEMS based device packages is tight and there is a growing need for smaller form factors. Two, these prior art techniques do not eliminate the moisture and contaminants that are formed inside the package as a result of, for example, outgassing.

A simple technique to effectively seal two surfaces to each other that does not occupy additional real estate is desirable.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The present invention is illustrated by way of example and not limitation in the figure of the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of package components that can be sealed with the hermetic seal of the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The hermetic seal including an adhesive mixed with an active component that can act as an absorbing filter on a molecular level is disclosed. The material can include a zeolite.

Additional features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the accompanying drawing and the detailed description that follows.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following descriptions for the purposes of explanation, numerous details are set forth such as examples of specific materials and methods in order to provide a thorough understanding of the present invention. It will be apparent, however, to one skilled in the art that these specific details are not required in order to practice the present invention. In other instances, well known materials and methods have not been described in detail in order to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the present invention.

In this description, a hermetic seal and, methods to create the same are disclosed. The hermetic seal includes an adhesive mixed with molecular sieves or zeolites. In one embodiment, the zeolites can include aluminosilicate-structured minerals such as sodium aluminosilicate. In another embodiment, the zeolites can include microporous silicate-structured minerals. It will be appreciated that active components other than zeolites that can act as absorbing filters on a molecular level can also be used. In one embodiment, the adhesive can include an adhesive with low outgassing numbers. In other embodiments, the adhesives can include adhesives with various outgassing numbers.

In one embodiment, the zeolites are mixed with the adhesive in a weight: ratio of 50:50. In other embodiments, the zeolites are mixed with the adhesive in various weight ratios. In one embodiment, the zeolites include zeolites in the powder form. In another embodiment, the zeolites include zeolites pellets. In yet another embodiment, the zeolites include zeolites beads.

The hermetic seal of the present invention can be applied as a bead between two surfaces to seal the two surfaces. The surfaces can include glass, metal, polymer, plastic, alloy or ceramic surfaces, or a combination thereof. The amount of bead that is applied can depend on the estimated amount of moisture or contaminant gases that will have to be removed from the package during the life of the package. This amount can be calculated by considering factors such as the amount of moisture/contamination that is present inside the package when the package is formed, the permeation rate of the adhesive, and the outgassing potential of the package components.

The zeolites can absorb water molecules at high temperatures. Zeolites of different pore sizes can be selected to absorb different contaminants. In one embodiment, the zeolites are selected to absorb contaminant molecules such as aromatic branched-chain hydrocarbons that have critical diameters of up to ten angstroms. In another embodiment, zeolites of pore sizes between two and three angstroms can be selected to absorb molecules of diameters less than two angstroms, namely hydrogen and moisture molecules. In yet another embodiment, zeolites of pore sizes of fifty angstroms are used to absorb nitrogen and carbon dioxide. molecules. In yet another embodiment, the hermetic seal can include a mixture of zeolites of various pore sizes.

The hermetic seal of the present invention can be constructed in a simple manner without using techniques such as welding and soldering, or by using o-rings. The bead can be applied through a simple in-line manufacturing process. The bead occupies a negligible amount of real estate and it does not significantly bulk up the package. The hermetic seal includes active components in the form of zeolites that can trap the moisture and other contaminant gases in their pores. The hermetic seal provides mechanical support to the MEMS based device package.

FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of package components that can be sealed with the hermetic seal of the present invention. The components 100 for the MEMS based device in the form of a flat panel display are shown. The components include the substrate glass 110, the mirror 120, the hermetic seal bead 130 and the back plate glass 140. The mirror 120 is processed on the substrate glass 110. The bead 130 is applied to the substrate glass 110 around the perimeter of the mirror 120. The back plate glass 140 is placed on top of the substrate glass 110. The substrate glass 110 and the back plate glass 140 are sealed together by the bead 130 to form the package 100. In the ensuing description, the terms components 100 and package 100 are used interchangeably. Also, in the ensuing description, the terms bead 130 and hermetic seal 130 are used interchangeably.

The mirror 120 can be referred to as the MEMS based device or the MEMS structure. The package 100 can also be referred to as the glass sandwich. The package 100 formed by the components 100 can be a component of a flat panel display. An array of mirrors such as the mirror 120 can be processed on the substrate glass 110 to form the flat panel display. The back plate glass 140 serves as the viewing surface. The back plate glass 140 also serves a mechanical function because it prevents the user from touching the mirror 110.

The mirror 120 can be processed through conventional semiconductor technology processes. The mirror 120 can include a metallic mirror such as an aluminum mirror. It will be appreciated that in addition to the mirror 120, the package can include other display elements. It will be appreciated that clear plastic surfaces can replace the substrate glass 110 and the back plate glass 140.

The bead 130 can be applied around the perimeter of the mirror 120. For the embodiments in which the substrate glass 110 includes a plurality of mirrors 130 120, the bead 130 can be applied around the perimeter of the plurality of mirrors 120. In one embodiment, the bead 130 thickness is one hundred angstroms. In another embodiment, the bead 130 thickness is two hundred angstroms. In yet another embodiment, the bead 130 thickness is three hundred angstroms. In still other embodiments, beads 130 of various thicknesses that maintain a low form factor for the package 100 can be applied.

It will be appreciated that the application of the hermetic seal 130 of the present invention is not limited to the MEMS based products. The hermetic seal 130 can seal various surfaces of various devices and products. The hermetic seal 130 can seal surfaces including metals, plastics, polymers, ceramics, alloys and the like. The hermetic seal 130 of the present invention is ideal for the space critical environments because it occupies negligible real estate. The prior art seals that are formed by using techniques such as welding and soldering or by using o-rings can substantially bulk up the size of the package 100. The hermetic seal 130 can be applied through simple in-line manufacturing processes. The prior art techniques of welding and soldering require very high temperature processes that are expensive, can damage the package, and occupy valuable real estate.

The hermetic seal 130 acts as an environmental barrier by blocking humidity and chemical contaminants from entering the package 100. The hermetic seal 130 includes an adhesive mixed with an active component such as the zeolites. The adhesive alone, even a low permeation rate adhesive, cannot serve as a perfect environmental barrier because it eventually allows the contaminants and moisture to permeate. The active component can grab the contaminants and moisture that try to permeate into the package 100, instead of merely blocking their entry. The active component can grab the contaminant gases that result from outgassing of the components 100 after the package 100 is formed. The active component can grab the portion of the adhesive that evaporates into the package 100 while the adhesive is curing. The thickness of the bead 130 and the amount of active component that is mixed with the adhesive can depend on the package 100 estimated life time and the estimated amount of contaminants and moisture that can penetrate the package 100 during the expected life time.

In some embodiments, an outer bead 150 of adhesive is applied around the perimeter of the bead 130. The outer bead 150 can include a low permeation rate adhesive. The outer bead 150 can provide additional environmental protection to the package 100. The outer bead can be useful for the aggressive environment in which the bead 130 alone cannot serve as an effective hermetic seal without being loaded with an impractical amount of the active component. If the bead 130 includes a very high portion of zeolites in the zeolites-adhesive mixture, for example more than sixty percent zeolites by weight, the bead 130 can become microscopically porous. The bead 130 can also become highly non-viscous and thus difficult to apply. Also, the bead 130 with a high percentage of zeolite by weight may not provide a robust mechanical support to the package 100. In aggressive environments, the application of the outer bead 150 can slow down the penetration process of contaminants and moisture into the package 100.

In the foregoing specification, the invention has been described with reference to specific exemplary embodiments thereof. It will, however, be evident that various modifications and changes may be made thereto without departing from the broader spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the claims. The specification and drawings are, accordingly, to be regarded in an illustrative rather than a restrictive sense.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534846Sep 8, 1947Dec 19, 1950Emi LtdColor filter
US3439973Jun 25, 1964Apr 22, 1969Siemens AgPolarizing reflector for electromagnetic wave radiation in the micron wavelength
US3443854Jun 25, 1964May 13, 1969Siemens AgDipole device for electromagnetic wave radiation in micron wavelength ranges
US3653741Feb 16, 1970Apr 4, 1972Alvin M MarksElectro-optical dipolar material
US3656836Jun 26, 1969Apr 18, 1972Thomson CsfLight modulator
US3704806 *Jan 6, 1971Dec 5, 1972Le T Im LensovetaDehumidifying composition and a method for preparing the same
US3813265Mar 23, 1972May 28, 1974Marks AElectro-optical dipolar material
US3900440 *Oct 23, 1973Aug 19, 1975Kuraray CoAdhesive composition
US3955880Jul 15, 1974May 11, 1976Organisation Europeenne De Recherches SpatialesInfrared radiation modulator
US4036360 *Nov 12, 1975Jul 19, 1977Graham Magnetics IncorporatedPackage having dessicant composition
US4074480 *Feb 12, 1976Feb 21, 1978Burton Henry W GKit for converting single-glazed window to double-glazed window
US4099854Oct 12, 1976Jul 11, 1978The Unites States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySuspension of absorbing particles in a group 1a or 2a halide
US4228437Jun 26, 1979Oct 14, 1980The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyWideband polarization-transforming electromagnetic mirror
US4377324Aug 4, 1980Mar 22, 1983Honeywell Inc.Graded index Fabry-Perot optical filter device
US4389096Feb 23, 1981Jun 21, 1983Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Image display apparatus of liquid crystal valve projection type
US4403248Mar 4, 1981Sep 6, 1983U.S. Philips CorporationDisplay device with deformable reflective medium
US4431691 *Jul 29, 1981Feb 14, 1984Tremco, IncorporatedDimensionally stable sealant and spacer strip and composite structures comprising the same
US4441791Jun 7, 1982Apr 10, 1984Texas Instruments IncorporatedDeformable mirror light modulator
US4445050Dec 15, 1981Apr 24, 1984Marks Alvin MDevice for conversion of light power to electric power
US4482213Nov 23, 1982Nov 13, 1984Texas Instruments IncorporatedPerimeter seal reinforcement holes for plastic LCDs
US4500171Jun 2, 1982Feb 19, 1985Texas Instruments IncorporatedProcess for plastic LCD fill hole sealing
US4519676Jan 24, 1983May 28, 1985U.S. Philips CorporationPassive display device
US4531126May 17, 1982Jul 23, 1985Societe D'etude Du RadantMethod and device for analyzing a very high frequency radiation beam of electromagnetic waves
US4552806 *Jul 12, 1983Nov 12, 1985Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Chuo KenkyushoCellular glass coated with a heat insulator
US4566935Jul 31, 1984Jan 28, 1986Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and method
US4571603Jan 10, 1984Feb 18, 1986Texas Instruments IncorporatedDeformable mirror electrostatic printer
US4596992Aug 31, 1984Jun 24, 1986Texas Instruments IncorporatedLinear spatial light modulator and printer
US4615595Oct 10, 1984Oct 7, 1986Texas Instruments IncorporatedFrame addressed spatial light modulator
US4662746Oct 30, 1985May 5, 1987Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and method
US4663083Apr 3, 1984May 5, 1987Marks Alvin MElectro-optical dipole suspension with reflective-absorptive-transmissive characteristics
US4681403Jun 19, 1986Jul 21, 1987U.S. Philips CorporationDisplay device with micromechanical leaf spring switches
US4710732Jul 31, 1984Dec 1, 1987Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and method
US4748366Sep 2, 1986May 31, 1988Taylor George WNovel uses of piezoelectric materials for creating optical effects
US4786128Dec 2, 1986Nov 22, 1988Quantum Diagnostics, Ltd.Device for modulating and reflecting electromagnetic radiation employing electro-optic layer having a variable index of refraction
US4790635Apr 24, 1987Dec 13, 1988The Secretary Of State For Defence In Her Brittanic Majesty's Government Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern IrelandElectro-optical device
US4856863Jun 22, 1988Aug 15, 1989Texas Instruments IncorporatedOptical fiber interconnection network including spatial light modulator
US4950344 *Dec 5, 1988Aug 21, 1990Lauren Manufacturing CompanyUsing ultraviolet curable adhesive as sealant
US4954789Sep 28, 1989Sep 4, 1990Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator
US4956619Oct 28, 1988Sep 11, 1990Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator
US4977009 *Mar 6, 1990Dec 11, 1990Ford Motor CompanyComposite polymer/desiccant coatings for IC encapsulation
US4982184Jan 3, 1989Jan 1, 1991General Electric CompanyElectrocrystallochromic display and element
US5018256Jun 29, 1990May 28, 1991Texas Instruments IncorporatedArchitecture and process for integrating DMD with control circuit substrates
US5018258Dec 1, 1989May 28, 1991Valmet Paper Machinery Inc.Support system for a variable-crown roll
US5022745Sep 7, 1989Jun 11, 1991Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyElectrostatically deformable single crystal dielectrically coated mirror
US5028939Jun 26, 1989Jul 2, 1991Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator system
US5037173Nov 22, 1989Aug 6, 1991Texas Instruments IncorporatedOptical interconnection network
US5044736Nov 6, 1990Sep 3, 1991Motorola, Inc.Configurable optical filter or display
US5061049Sep 13, 1990Oct 29, 1991Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and method
US5075796Sep 17, 1990Dec 24, 1991Eastman Kodak CompanyOptical article for multicolor imaging
US5078479Apr 18, 1991Jan 7, 1992Centre Suisse D'electronique Et De Microtechnique SaLight modulation device with matrix addressing
US5079544Feb 27, 1989Jan 7, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedStandard independent digitized video system
US5083857Jun 29, 1990Jan 28, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedMulti-level deformable mirror device
US5095375 *Mar 29, 1991Mar 10, 1992Hughes Aircraft CompanyHolographic combiner edge seal design and composition
US5096279Nov 26, 1990Mar 17, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and method
US5099353Jan 4, 1991Mar 24, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedArchitecture and process for integrating DMD with control circuit substrates
US5124834Nov 16, 1989Jun 23, 1992General Electric CompanyTransferrable, self-supporting pellicle for elastomer light valve displays and method for making the same
US5142405Jun 29, 1990Aug 25, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedBistable dmd addressing circuit and method
US5153771Jul 18, 1990Oct 6, 1992Northrop CorporationCoherent light modulation and detector
US5162787May 30, 1991Nov 10, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedApparatus and method for digitized video system utilizing a moving display surface
US5168406Jul 31, 1991Dec 1, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedColor deformable mirror device and method for manufacture
US5170156May 30, 1991Dec 8, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedDigitized video system
US5172262Apr 16, 1992Dec 15, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and method
US5179274Jul 12, 1991Jan 12, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedMethod for controlling operation of optical systems and devices
US5192395Oct 12, 1990Mar 9, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedMethod of making a digital flexure beam accelerometer
US5192946May 30, 1991Mar 9, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedDigitized color video display system
US5206629Jul 3, 1991Apr 27, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator and memory for digitized video display
US5212582Mar 4, 1992May 18, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedElectrostatically controlled beam steering device and method
US5214419Jun 26, 1991May 25, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedPlanarized true three dimensional display
US5214420Jun 26, 1991May 25, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator projection system with random polarity light
US5216537Jan 2, 1992Jun 1, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedForming a spatial light modulator
US5226099Apr 26, 1991Jul 6, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedDigital micromirror shutter device
US5231532Feb 5, 1992Jul 27, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedSwitchable resonant filter for optical radiation
US5233385Dec 18, 1991Aug 3, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedWhite light enhanced color field sequential projection
US5233456Dec 20, 1991Aug 3, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedResonant mirror and method of manufacture
US5233459Mar 6, 1991Aug 3, 1993Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyElectric display device
US5244707 *Jan 10, 1992Sep 14, 1993Shores A AndrewEnclosure for electronic devices
US5254980Sep 6, 1991Oct 19, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedDMD display system controller
US5272473Aug 17, 1992Dec 21, 1993Texas Instruments IncorporatedCoherent light projection system
US5278652Mar 23, 1993Jan 11, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedDMD architecture and timing for use in a pulse width modulated display system
US5280277Nov 17, 1992Jan 18, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedField updated deformable mirror device
US5287096Sep 18, 1992Feb 15, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedVariable luminosity display system
US5296950Jan 31, 1992Mar 22, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedOptical signal free-space conversion board
US5304419 *Mar 9, 1992Apr 19, 1994Alpha Fry LtdElectronics; pressure sensitive adhesive and desiccant
US5305640May 1, 1992Apr 26, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedDigital flexure beam accelerometer
US5311360Apr 28, 1992May 10, 1994The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford, Junior UniversityMethod and apparatus for modulating a light beam
US5312513Apr 3, 1992May 17, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedDeformable mirror device with patterns, circuits and etching to form patterns
US5323002Jun 8, 1993Jun 21, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedSpatial light modulator based optical calibration system
US5325116Sep 18, 1992Jun 28, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedDevice for writing to and reading from optical storage media
US5327286Aug 31, 1992Jul 5, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedReal time optical correlation system
US5331454Jan 16, 1992Jul 19, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedLow reset voltage process for DMD
US5339116Oct 15, 1993Aug 16, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedDMD architecture and timing for use in a pulse-width modulated display system
US5365283Jul 19, 1993Nov 15, 1994Texas Instruments IncorporatedColor phase control for projection display using spatial light modulator
US5381253Nov 14, 1991Jan 10, 1995Board Of Regents Of University Of ColoradoChiral smectic liquid crystal optical modulators having variable retardation
US5401983Apr 7, 1993Mar 28, 1995Georgia Tech Research CorporationProcesses for lift-off of thin film materials or devices for fabricating three dimensional integrated circuits, optical detectors, and micromechanical devices
US5411769Sep 29, 1993May 2, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedForming a low surface energy, wear resistant thin film on the surface of a device
US5444566Mar 7, 1994Aug 22, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedOptimized electronic operation of digital micromirror devices
US5446479Aug 4, 1992Aug 29, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedMulti-dimensional array video processor system
US5448314Jan 7, 1994Sep 5, 1995Texas InstrumentsMethod and apparatus for sequential color imaging
US5452024Nov 1, 1993Sep 19, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedDMD display system
US5454906Jun 21, 1994Oct 3, 1995Texas Instruments Inc.Method of providing sacrificial spacer for micro-mechanical devices
US5457493Sep 15, 1993Oct 10, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedDigital micro-mirror based image simulation system
US5457566Dec 30, 1992Oct 10, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedFor scanning an image
US5459602Oct 29, 1993Oct 17, 1995Texas InstrumentsMicro-mechanical optical shutter
US5459610May 20, 1993Oct 17, 1995The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford, Junior UniversityDeformable grating apparatus for modulating a light beam and including means for obviating stiction between grating elements and underlying substrate
US5461411Mar 29, 1993Oct 24, 1995Texas Instruments IncorporatedProcess and architecture for digital micromirror printer
US5489952Jul 14, 1993Feb 6, 1996Texas Instruments IncorporatedMethod and device for multi-format television
US5497172Jun 13, 1994Mar 5, 1996Texas Instruments IncorporatedMethod of loading frames of data to a spatial light modulator
US5497197Nov 4, 1993Mar 5, 1996Texas Instruments IncorporatedSystem and method for packaging data into video processor
US5499062Jun 23, 1994Mar 12, 1996Texas Instruments IncorporatedMultiplexed memory timing with block reset and secondary memory
US5500635Nov 10, 1994Mar 19, 1996Mott; Jonathan C.Shoe that lights
US5547823 *Nov 9, 1995Aug 20, 1996Ishihara Sangyo Kaisha, Ltd.Photocatalyst composite and process for producing the same
US5553440 *Oct 20, 1994Sep 10, 1996Ppg Industries, Inc.Multi-sheet glazing unit and method of making same
US5591379 *Aug 2, 1993Jan 7, 1997Alpha Fry LimitedMoisture getting composition for hermetic microelectronic devices
US5815141 *Apr 12, 1996Sep 29, 1998Elo Touch Systems, Inc.Resistive touchscreen having multiple selectable regions for pressure discrimination
US5835255 *May 5, 1994Nov 10, 1998Etalon, Inc.Visible spectrum modulator arrays
US5853662 *Apr 17, 1996Dec 29, 1998Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Company, Inc.Method for preserving polished inorganic glass and method for preserving article obtained by using the same
US5986796 *Nov 5, 1996Nov 16, 1999Etalon Inc.Visible spectrum modulator arrays
US6040937 *Jul 31, 1996Mar 21, 2000Etalon, Inc.Interferometric modulation
US6055090 *Jan 27, 1999Apr 25, 2000Etalon, Inc.Interferometric modulation
US6238755 *Nov 13, 1998May 29, 2001Dow Corning CorporationInsulating glass units
US6355328 *Nov 23, 1998Mar 12, 2002Truseal Technologies, Inc.Preformed flexible laminate
US6465355 *Apr 27, 2001Oct 15, 2002Hewlett-Packard CompanyMethod of fabricating suspended microstructures
US6466358 *Dec 28, 2000Oct 15, 2002Texas Instruments IncorporatedAnalog pulse width modulation cell for digital micromechanical device
US6473274 *Jun 28, 2000Oct 29, 2002Texas Instruments IncorporatedSymmetrical microactuator structure for use in mass data storage devices, or the like
US6480177 *Jun 2, 1998Nov 12, 2002Texas Instruments IncorporatedBlocked stepped address voltage for micromechanical devices
US6496122 *Jun 26, 1998Dec 17, 2002Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc.Image display and remote control system capable of displaying two distinct images
US6545335 *Dec 27, 1999Apr 8, 2003Xerox CorporationStructure and method for electrical isolation of optoelectronic integrated circuits
US6548908 *Dec 27, 1999Apr 15, 2003Xerox CorporationStructure and method for planar lateral oxidation in passive devices
US6549338 *Nov 7, 2000Apr 15, 2003Texas Instruments IncorporatedBandpass filter to reduce thermal impact of dichroic light shift
US6552840 *Nov 30, 2000Apr 22, 2003Texas Instruments IncorporatedElectrostatic efficiency of micromechanical devices
US6582789 *Sep 28, 2000Jun 24, 2003Teijin LimitedSurface protective film and laminate formed therefrom
US6600201 *Aug 3, 2001Jul 29, 2003Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Systems with high density packing of micromachines
US6606175 *Mar 16, 1999Aug 12, 2003Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc.Multi-segment light-emitting diode
US6625047 *Dec 31, 2001Sep 23, 2003Texas Instruments IncorporatedMicromechanical memory element
US6630786 *Mar 30, 2001Oct 7, 2003Candescent Technologies CorporationLight-emitting device having light-reflective layer formed with, or/and adjacent to, material that enhances device performance
US6643069 *Aug 28, 2001Nov 4, 2003Texas Instruments IncorporatedSLM-base color projection display having multiple SLM's and multiple projection lenses
US6650455 *Nov 13, 2001Nov 18, 2003Iridigm Display CorporationPhotonic mems and structures
US6674090 *Dec 27, 1999Jan 6, 2004Xerox CorporationStructure and method for planar lateral oxidation in active
US6674562 *Apr 8, 1998Jan 6, 2004Iridigm Display CorporationInterferometric modulation of radiation
US6680792 *Oct 10, 2001Jan 20, 2004Iridigm Display CorporationInterferometric modulation of radiation
US6709750 *May 20, 1999Mar 23, 2004Metallgesellschaft AktiengesellschaftHot-melt adhesive for sealing the edge of laminated glass
US6710908 *Feb 13, 2002Mar 23, 2004Iridigm Display CorporationControlling micro-electro-mechanical cavities
US6775174 *Dec 28, 2001Aug 10, 2004Texas Instruments IncorporatedMemory architecture for micromirror cell
US6778155 *Jul 31, 2001Aug 17, 2004Texas Instruments IncorporatedDisplay operation with inserted block clears
US6822628 *Jun 28, 2001Nov 23, 2004Candescent Intellectual Property Services, Inc.Methods and systems for compensating row-to-row brightness variations of a field emission display
US6859218 *Nov 7, 2000Feb 22, 2005Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Electronic display devices and methods
US20030043157 *Aug 19, 2002Mar 6, 2003Iridigm Display CorporationPhotonic MEMS and structures
US20030072070 *Feb 25, 2002Apr 17, 2003Etalon, Inc., A Ma CorporationVisible spectrum modulator arrays
US20030202266 *Mar 12, 2003Oct 30, 2003Ring James W.Micro-mirror device with light angle amplification
US20040051929 *Aug 19, 2003Mar 18, 2004Sampsell Jeffrey BrianSeparable modulator
US20040240032 *Jan 5, 2004Dec 2, 2004Miles Mark W.Interferometric modulation of radiation
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1"Light over Matter," Circle No. 36 (Jun. 1993).
2Akasaka, "Three-Dimensional IC Trends," Proceedings of IEEE, vol. 74, No. 12, pp. 1703-1714 (Dec. 1986).
3Aratani et al., "Process and Design Considerations for Surface Micromachined Beams for a Tuneable Interferometer Array in Silicon," Proc. IEEE Microelectromechanical Workshop, Fort Lauderdale, FL, pp. 230-235 (Feb. 1993).
4Aratani et al., "Surface Micromachined Tuneable Interferometer Array," Sensors and Actuators, pp. 17-23 (1994).
5Conner, "Hybrid Color Display Using Optical Interference Filter Array," SID Digest, pp. 577-580 (1993).
6Goosen et al., "Silicoon Modulator Based on Mechanically-Active Anti-Reflection Layer with 1Mbit/sec Capability for Fiber-in-the-Loop Applications," IEEE Photonics Technology Letters (Sep. 1994).
7Goossen et al., "Possible Display Applications of the Silicon Mechinical Anti-Reflection Switch, " Society for Information Display (1994).
8Gosch, "West Germany Grabs the Lead in X-Ray Litography," Electronics, pp. 78-80 (Feb. 5, 1987).
9Howard et al., "Nanometer-Scale Fabrication Techniques," VLSI Electronics:Microstructure Science, vol. 5, pp. 145-153 and pp. 166-173 (1982).
10Jackson, "Classical Electrodynamics," John Wiley & Sons Inc., pp. 568-573.
11Jerman et al., "A Miniature Fabry-Perot Interfrometer with a Corrugated Silicon Diaphragm Support," IEEE Electron Devices Society (1988).
12Johnson "Optical Scanners," Microwave Scanning Antennas, vol. 1, pp. 251-261 (1964).
13Miles, "A New Reflective FPD Technology Using Interferometric Modulation," Society for Information Display '97 Digest, Session 7.3.
14Newsbreaks, "Quantum-trench devices might operate at terahertz frequencies," Laser Focus World (May 1993).
15Office Action mailed Sep. 24, 2002 in U.S. App. No. 09/921,196.
16Oliner et al., "Radiating Elements and Mutual Coupling," Microwave Scanning Antennas, vol. 2, pp. 134-194 (1966).
17Raley et al., "A Fabry-Perot Microinterferometer for Visible Wavelenghts," IEEE Solid-State Sensor and Actuator Workshop, Hilton Head, SC (1992).
18Sperger et al., "High Performance Patterned All-Dielectric Interference Colour Filter for Display Applications," SID Digest, pp. 81-83 (1994).
19Stone, "Radiation and Optics, An Introduction to the Classical Theory," McGraw-Hill, pp. 340-343 (1963).
20Walker, et al., "Electron-beam-tunable Interference Filter Spatial Light Modulator," Optics Letters, vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 345-347 (May 1988).
21Winton, John M., "A novel way to capture solar energy," Chemical Week, pp. 17-18 (May 15, 1985).
22Wu, "Design of a Reflective Color LCD Using Optical Interference Reflectors," ASIA Display '95, pp. 929-931 (Oct. 16, 1995).
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7561334Dec 20, 2005Jul 14, 2009Qualcomm Mems Technologies, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing back-glass deflection in an interferometric modulator display device
US7629678Aug 21, 2007Dec 8, 2009Qualcomm Mems Technologies, Inc.Method and system for sealing a substrate
US7642127Jul 17, 2007Jan 5, 2010Qualcomm Mems Technologies, Inc.Method and system for sealing a substrate
US7715080Apr 13, 2007May 11, 2010Qualcomm Mems Technologies, Inc.Packaging a MEMS device using a frame
US7826127Jun 20, 2007Nov 2, 2010Qualcomm Mems Technologies, Inc.MEMS device having a recessed cavity and methods therefor
US7935555Nov 30, 2009May 3, 2011Qualcomm Mems Technologies, Inc.Method and system for sealing a substrate
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/46, 428/76, 428/355.00R, 428/192, 428/49
International ClassificationB32B3/10, B81B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB81B7/0041, B81C2203/019
European ClassificationB81B7/00P2Z
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 28, 2010FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jun 3, 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: IDC, LLC,CALIFORNIA
Effective date: 20041210
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KOTHARI, MANISH;CHUI, CLARENCE;REEL/FRAME:024484/0387
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KOTHARI, MANISH;CHUI, CLARENCE;REEL/FRAME:024484/0264
Oct 30, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: QUALCOMM MEMS TECHNOLOGIES, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:IDC,LLC;REEL/FRAME:023449/0614
Effective date: 20090925