Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUSRE42812 E1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/361,039
Publication dateOct 4, 2011
Filing dateFeb 23, 2006
Priority dateApr 13, 2000
Also published asUS6697905
Publication number11361039, 361039, US RE42812 E1, US RE42812E1, US-E1-RE42812, USRE42812 E1, USRE42812E1
InventorsRichard Bealkowski
Original AssigneeRaritan, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for providing I/O support to a computer system and method of use thereof
US RE42812 E1
Abstract
An apparatus for providing I/O support to a computer system and a method of use thereof is disclosed. The apparatus in accordance with the present invention includes an internal control element located within the apparatus. The control element allows the apparatus in accordance with the present invention to relinquish ownership of the associated I/O devices for the purpose of being used by another computer. Accordingly, through the use of the apparatus in accordance with the present invention, expensive KVM switches and cabling, along with the accompanying I/O devices, are no longer needed to provide I/O support for computer networks. A first aspect of the present invention provides an apparatus for providing I/O support to a computer system. The apparatus comprises an I/O device and an internal control element coupled to the I/O device for relinquishing ownership of the I/O device from the apparatus to the computer network. A second aspect of the present invention provides a method for providing I/O support to a computer system. The method comprises the steps of providing an apparatus wherein the apparatus includes an I/O device and an internal control element coupled to the I/O device and utilizing the internal control element to allow ownership of the I/O device to be relinquished from the apparatus to the computer system.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(52)
1. An apparatus in a host computer system for enabling the host computer system to provide I/O support to a second computer system, wherein the host computer system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the apparatus comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the second computer system to the host computer system;
an internal control element coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the first connecting port, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display and a keyboard, and a USB device; and
a second connecting port for coupling the plurality of host controllers in the host computer system to the internal control element,
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the second computer system and the host computer system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the apparatus further includes a hub coupled to the internal control element.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first connecting port comprises a universal serial bus connector.
4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein the first connecting port further comprises a display device connector.
5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first connecting port for coupling the second computer system directly to the host computer system comprises a an infra red type connector.
6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first connecting port for coupling the second computer system directly to the host computer system comprises a wireless type connector.
7. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the internal control element further includes means for coupling a visual display device to the apparatus.
8. The apparatus of claim 57 wherein the visual display device is a thin film transistor-type visual display device.
9. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the apparatus is capable of operating in one of at least two modes.
10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein the at least two modes comprise a host mode and a hub mode.
11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein the internal control element is capable of switching the at least two modes.
12. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein if the apparatus is operating in the host mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the host computer system.
13. The apparatus of claim 12 wherein if the apparatus is operating in the hub mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the second computer system.
14. The apparatus of claim 13 wherein the second computer system comprises at least one computer.
15. An apparatus in a host computer system for enabling the host computer system to provide I/O support to a second computer system, wherein the host computer system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the apparatus comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the second computer system to the host computer system;
a hub coupled to the plurality of I/O devices, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display and, a keyboard, and a USB device;
an internal control element coupled to the hub and to the first connecting port; and
a second connecting port for coupling the plurality of host controllers in the host computer system to the internal control element,
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the second computer system and the host computer system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
16. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the internal control element further includes means for coupling a visual display device to the apparatus.
17. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein the visual display device is a thin film transistor-type visual display device.
18. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the apparatus is capable of operating in one of at least two modes.
19. The apparatus of claim 18 wherein the at least two modes comprise a host mode and a hub mode.
20. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the internal control element is capable of switching the at least two modes.
21. The apparatus of claim 20 wherein if the apparatus is operating in the host mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the host computer system.
22. The apparatus of claim 21 wherein if the apparatus is operating in the hub mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the second computer system.
23. The apparatus of claim 22 wherein the second computer system comprises at least one computer.
24. An apparatus in a host computer system for enabling the host computer system to provide I/O support to a second computer system, wherein the host computer system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O device, the apparatus comprising:
a hub coupled to the plurality of I/O devices, wherein the plurality of I/O devicedevices comprises a display and, a keyboard, and a USB device;
an internal control element coupled to the hub, the internal control element including means for switching the apparatus to one of at least two operational modes, the at least two operational modes comprising a host mode and a hub mode wherein if the apparatus is operating in the host mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the host computer system and if the apparatus is operating in the hub mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the second computer system;
a first connecting port coupled to the internal control element for coupling the second computer system directly to the host computer system, the first connecting port comprising a universal serial bus connector and a display device connector; and
a second connecting port coupled to the internal control element and to the plurality of host controllers in the host computer system for coupling the host controllers to the plurality of I/O devices.
25. A method of providing I/O support by a host computer system to a second computer system, wherein the host computer system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the method comprising the steps of:
a) directly coupling the second computer system to the host computer system via first connecting port in the host computer system;
b) providing an internal control element in the host computer system coupled to the first connecting port and to the plurality of I/O devices, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display and, a keyboard, and a USB device;
c) coupling the plurality of host controllers in the host computer system to the internal control element via a second connecting port in the computer system; and
d) utilizing the internal control element to regulate control of the plurality of I/O devices by the second computer system and the host computer system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
26. The method of claim 25 wherein the host computer system further comprises a hub coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the internal control element.
27. The method of claim 26 wherein the host computer system is capable of operating in one of at least two operational modes.
28. The method of claim 27 wherein the internal control element is capable of switching the host computer system to one of the at least two operational modes.
29. The method of claim 28 wherein step b) further comprises:
b1) coupling the internal control element directly to the second computer system; and
b2) utilizing the internal control element to switch the host computer system to one of the at least two operational modes.
30. The method of claim 29 wherein the at least two operational modes comprise a host mode and a hub mode.
31. The method of claim 30 wherein step b2) further comprises:
b2i) switching to the host mode; and
b2ii) allowing the host computer system to control the plurality of I/O devices.
32. The method of claim 31 wherein step b2i) is provided in response to an interaction with the host computer system.
33. The method of claim 30 wherein step b2) further comprises:
b2i) switching to the hub mode; and
b2ii) allowing the second computer system to control the plurality of I/O devices.
34. The method of claim 33 wherein step b2i) is provided in response to an interaction with the host computer system.
35. A processing system for providing I/O support to one of a plurality of network server computers, wherein the processing system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the processing system comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the one network server computer to the processing system;
an internal control element coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the first connecting port, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display and, a keyboard, and a USB device; and
a second connecting port for coupling the plurality of host controllers in the processing system to the internal control element,
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the one network server computer and the processing system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
36. The processing system of claim 35 wherein the processing system further includes a hub coupled to the internal control element.
37. The processing system of claim 36 wherein the first connecting port comprises a universal serial bus connector and a display device connector.
38. The processing system of claim 36 wherein the first connecting port for coupling the processing system directly to the one network server computer comprises an infra red type connector.
39. The processing system of claim 36 wherein the first connecting port for coupling the processing system directly to the one network server computer comprises a wireless type connector.
40. The processing system of claim 36 wherein the processing system is capable of operating in one of at least two modes.
41. The processing system of claim 40 wherein the at least two modes comprise a host mode and a hub mode.
42. The processing system of claim 41 wherein the internal control element is capable of switching the at least two modes.
43. The processing system of claim 42 wherein if the processing system is operating in the host mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the processing system.
44. The processing system of claim 43 wherein if the processing system is operating in the hub mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the one network server computer.
45. A processing system for providing I/O support to one of a plurality of network server computers, wherein the processing system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the processing system comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the one network server computer to the processing system;
an internal control element coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the first connecting port, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display, a keyboard and a USB connecter; and
a second connecting port for coupling the plurality of host controllers in the processing system to the internal control element,
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the one network server computer and the processing system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
46. The processing system of claim 45, wherein the USB connector is electrically coupled to a USB device.
47. A processing system for providing I/O support to one of a plurality of network server computers, wherein the processing system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the processing system comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the one network server computer to the processing system;
an internal control element coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the first connecting port, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display, a keyboard and a USB device controlled by at least one of the plurality of host controllers;
a second connecting port for coupling the plurality of host controllers in the processing system to the internal control element, and
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the one network server computer and the processing system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
48. A processing system for providing I/O support to one of a plurality of network server computers, wherein the processing system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the processing system comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the one network server computer to the processing system;
an internal control element coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the first connecting port, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display, a keyboard and a USB device; and
a second connecting port for electrically coupling the plurality of host controllers in the processing system to the internal control element,
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the one network server computer and the processing system via the first and second connecting ports respectively.
49. A processing system for providing I/O support to one of a plurality of network server computers, wherein the processing system includes a plurality of host controllers and a plurality of I/O devices, the processing system comprising:
a first connecting port for directly coupling the one network server computer to the processing system;
an internal control element coupled to the plurality of I/O devices and to the first connecting port, wherein the plurality of I/O devices comprises a display, a keyboard and a USB device; and
a second connecting port for electrically coupling the plurality of host controllers in the processing system to the internal control element,
wherein the internal control element regulates control of the plurality of I/O devices by the one network server computer and the processing system via the first and second connecting ports respectively; and
wherein the processing system is capable of operating in one of at least two modes, a host mode and a hub mode,
wherein the internal control element is capable of switching the at least two modes; and
wherein if the processing system is operating in the host mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the processing system, and if the processing system is operating in the hub mode, the plurality of I/O devices are controlled by the one network server computer.
50. The processing system of claim 49, wherein the first connecting port for directly coupling includes an external connection.
51. The processing system of claim 50, wherein the external connection includes a display cable and a USB cable directly coupling to the one network server.
52. The processing system of claim 51, wherein in the second connecting port for electrically coupling includes an internal connection which electrically couples the host controllers to the I/O devices via the internal control element.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to computer systems and more particularly to an apparatus for providing input/output support to a computer system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 illustrates a conventional computer system 10. Computer system 10 typically includes the main computer system 12, a keyboard 14, a mouse 16, a display device or monitor 18, a diskette or floppy drive 20 and a compact disc (CD) or digital versatile disc (DVD) drive 22. It is understood that computer system 10 is for illustrative purposes and includes numerous components not shown.

Large installation computer networks typically incorporate racks of server computers (servers) to provide services to the other computers within the networks. The functions performed by each of these servers vary depending on the network and the server's place within the particular network. For example, at least one server typically functions as “file server” for the network. A computer functioning as a file server will usually have significantly more data storage capacity than the other computers connected to the network. The networked computers utilize this data storage capacity to store files and databases. Software executed by the file server controls access to these files and databases.

Typically, each server within each rack would incorporate certain peripheral input/output (I/O) devices such as a keyboard, a mouse, a display device, a floppy disk drive and a CD/DVD drive. However, these I/O devices are not used, except at certain critical installation points or for routine computer maintenance. Therefore, within the context of a large computer network environment, they are characterized as low-use devices.

When setting up these large installation computer networks it is desirable to minimize cost as well as the amount of space used. Consequently, to minimize the space used by the low-use devices, a keyboard/video/mouse (KVM) switch is sometimes incorporated.

Through the use of a KVM switch, only one set of keyboard, mouse and display devices are utilized by the rack of servers. FIG. 2 illustrates a conventional KVM system 50 comprising a rack 52 populated with a number of server computers 54-68, switch 70, keyboard 14, mouse 16 and display device 18. The KVM switch 70 is cabled to each of the server computers 54-68 and to keyboard 14, mouse 16 and display device 18. If a computer operator or technician subsequently needs to access one of the server computers 54-68 in rack 52, KVM switch 70 is utilized to associate keyboard 14, mouse 16 and display device 18 with the appropriate server computer 54-68. The computer operator or technician is then able to use the keyboard 14, mouse 16, and display device 18 to interact with the appropriate server computer 54-68. However, due to the high cost of KVM switches and associated extensive cabling and the valuable rack space occupied, their utilization is less than desirable. Also note that the KVM system 50 does not address a solution for additional I/O such as the floppy drive 20 and CD/DVD drive 22 which is typically duplicated within each server 54-68 in rack 52.

Accordingly, what is needed is a low cost, space saving method and apparatus for providing I/O support for these and other types of systems. The present invention addresses such a need.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A first aspect of the present invention provides an apparatus for providing I/O support to a computer system. The apparatus comprises an I/O device and an internal control element coupled to the I/O device for relinquishing ownership of the I/O device from the apparatus to the computer system.

A second aspect of the present invention provides a method for providing I/O support to a computer system. The method comprises the steps of providing an apparatus wherein the apparatus includes an I/O device and an internal control element coupled to the I/O device and utilizing the internal control element to allow ownership of the I/O device to be relinquished from the apparatus to the computer system.

The use of the method and apparatus in accordance with the present invention saves space and money since expensive KVM switches, along with the accompanying I/O devices, are no longer needed to provide I/O support for computer networks.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a conventional computer system.

FIG. 2 illustrates a conventional KVM switching system.

FIG. 3 shows an apparatus in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of the utilization of the apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a method of using an apparatus in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 6 is an illustration of the utilization of the apparatus in accordance with the present invention wherein the apparatus provides I/O support for a single computer system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for providing I/O support. The following description is presented to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to make and use the invention and is provided in the context of a patent application and its requirements. Various modifications to the preferred embodiment and the generic principles and features described herein will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. Thus, the present invention is not intended to be limited to the embodiment shown but is to be accorded the widest scope consistent with the principles and features described herein.

The present invention is disclosed in the context of a preferred embodiment. The preferred embodiment of the present invention is an apparatus for providing I/O support to a computer system and a method of use thereof. The apparatus in accordance with the present invention is an enhanced portable or notebook computer system (e.g. an enhanced IBM Thinkpad) that includes a low cost means for providing I/O support to another computer via a control mechanism located within the apparatus. The control mechanism allows the apparatus in accordance with the present invention to relinquish ownership of the I/O devices coupled thereto for the purpose of being used by another computer. Accordingly, through the use of the apparatus in accordance with the present invention, expensive KVM switches and cabling, along with the accompanying I/O devices, are no longer needed to provide I/O support for the computer networks.

For a further description of the apparatus in accordance with the present invention, please refer now to FIG. 3. FIG. 3 shows an apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention. Apparatus 100 comprises control element 102, internal connection 108 coupled to host controllers 130, external connection 120 and display device 128. Display device 128 is preferable a thin film transistor (TFT) type display device. External connection 120 is further comprised of USB connector 104 and display device connector 106. Apparatus 100 is further comprised of hub 110 coupled to USB compatible devices floppy or diskette drive 120121, CD or DVD drive 122, keyboard 124, mouse 126, parallel port 116 and serial port 118. Apparatus 100 also includes optional USB converter 112 and optional USB converter 114. Optional USB converter 112, 114 are shown to describe a methodology to bridge a USB subsystem to a potentially non-USB subsystem such as parallel port 116 and serial port 118. Preferably parallel port 116 and serial port 118 are native USB type devices thus eliminating the need for any converters 112, 114.

Control element 102 is coupled to internal connection 108 and external connection 120. Control element 102 is further connected to TFT 128 and hub 110. Control element 102 operates in one of two modes, internal or host mode and external or hub mode. In host mode control element 102 electrically couples internal connection 108 to TFT 128 and hub 110. In hub mode control element 102 electrically couples external connection 120 with TFT 128 and hub 110.

In alternate embodiments external connection 120 can be comprised of a single high speed serial connection such as IEEE 1394. Selection of a single high speed serial connection such as IEEE 1394 is based on such factors as commercial acceptance of the IEEE 1394 standard and the internal architecture of apparatus 100.

When operating in host mode, the apparatus 100 owns all of the I/O devices and operates in a normal fashion (i.e. as a typical notebook computer system). For the purposes of this application, an I/O device is owned by a computer if the I/O device is recognized and dedicated for use by the computer. Hence, when an I/O device, such as a visual display device, is owned by a designated computer, the visual display device only displays information related to the designated computer. Accordingly, in the host mode, the internal connection 108 recognizes the I/O devices TFT 128 and hub 110 and dedicates their use to apparatus 100.

In the hub mode,the apparatus 100 relinquishes ownership of the I/O devices and makes them available for use by another system. While apparatus 100 is operating in hub mode another system (not shown) cabled to external connection 120 could recognize and utilize the I/O devices TFT 128 and hub 110 via control 102 and further access floppy drive 120121, CD/DVD drive 122, keyboard 124, mouse 126, parallel port 116 and serial port 118 via hub 110. Thus, the visual display device TFT 128 essentially becomes a stand-alo visual display device capable of receiving input signals from another system (not shown). And I/O devices floppy drive 120, CD/DVD drive 122, keyboard 124, mouse 126, parallel port 116 and serial port 118 essentially become dedicated “local” I/O devices for another system (not shown). Accordingly, a computer technician or other operator needs only the apparatus 100 and two cables (a USB cable and a display cable) to provide I/O support to a server computer.

Please note that in either mode of apparatus 100, host mode or hub mode, the apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention retains its native computing capabilities including computer processor, memory, and networking functions.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of the utilization of the apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention. FIG. 4 shows a rack of servers 200 wherein one of the servers 202 is coupled to the apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention via a USB cable 204 and a display cable 206. Consequently, a set of stand-alone I/O devices (and associated space within the rack) are not needed to provide I/O support for the rack of servers 200. In addition, a floppy drive and CD/DVD drive and certain other I/O devices are no longer, required to be included in each server in rack 200.

Although the preferred embodiment of the present invention is described in the context of being used with cable-type connectors, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that a variety of coupling means could be utilized. For example, the present invention could be implemented via a sufficiently high bandwidth infrared or wireless type coupling means while remaining within the spirit and scope of the present invention.

The switching of the apparatus 100 from hub mode to host mode or vice versa can be to done in a variety of ways. Preferably the mode changes are accomplished through some type of function key (Fn) sequence. For example, the key sequence Fn+F1 could be designated for host/hub mode changes. However, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that the host/hub mode change could be implemented in a variety of ways while remaining within the spirit and scope of the present invention.

For a better understanding of the present invention, please refer to FIG. 5. FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a method of using an apparatus in accordance with the present invention. The method begins by providing a first system wherein the first system includes an I/O device, via step 300. Next, the apparatus in accordance with the present invention is coupled to a second system, via step 302. Next, ownership of the I/O device is relinquished from the first system to the second system, via step 304. Preferable, ownership of the I/O device is relinquished based upon a triggering event, i.e. a user interaction. Preferably, the triggering event is the performance of some type of function key sequence. The second system utilizes the I/O device as required, via step 306. The apparatus in accordance with the present invention is then switched back to host mode, via step 308. The apparatus of the present invention is then decoupled from the second system, via step 310. Finally, via step 312, the apparatus in accordance with the present invention is removed, potentially for other subsequent uses.

Although the above-outlined description contemplates utilizing the apparatus in accordance with the present invention as a means for providing I/O support to a rack of server computers, the scope of the implementation of the present invention is not limited to server computer support. The apparatus in accordance with the present invention could also be employed to provide I/O support for a single computer system such as a typical desk-top or desk-side computer system.

Many computer users today have an office computer system and a portable or laptop computer system. The apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention can be used to improve the affordability of office systems as well. An office system which employs apparatus 100 in accordance with the present invention can be deployed at a significantly reduced cost by eliminating potentially redundant keyboard, mouse, display, floppy drive, CD/DVD drive, etc. devices.

FIG. 6 is an illustration of the utilization of the apparatus in accordance with the present invention wherein the apparatus provides I/O support for a single computer system 310. The computer system 310 is preferably coupled to a dock 312 via coupling device 314. Preferable, coupling device 314 comprises a cable. Dock 312 further comprises docking port 316. Docking port 316 is compatible with apparatus 100. Accordingly, once apparatus 100 is coupled to docking port 316, the I/O devices that are recognized by the apparatus 100, are now capable of being recognized by the computer system 310. Thus, a conventional keyborad mouse, stand-alone monitor, floppy drive, CD/DVD drive, etc. are no longer required to be provided as integral elements of computer system 310.

The apparatus in accordance with the present invention provides a low cost means for providing I/O support to another system via a switching mechanism located within the apparatus. The switching mechanism allows the apparatus in accordance with the present invention to relinquish ownership of the I/O devices coupled thereto for the purpose of being used by the other system. The use of the apparatus in accordance with the present invention saves space and money since the expensive KVM switches and associated cables, along with accompanying I/O devices, are no longer needed to provide I/O support for computer networks.

Although the present invention has been described in accordance with the embodiments shown, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that there could be variations to the embodiments and those variations would be within the spirit and scope of the present invention. Accordingly, many modifications may be made by one of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the spirit of the appended claims.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5193174 *Jul 23, 1990Mar 9, 1993International Business Machines CorporationSystem for automatically redirecting information to alternate system console in response to the comparison of present and default system configuration in personal computer system
US5280585 *Sep 28, 1990Jan 18, 1994Hewlett-Packard CompanyDevice sharing system using PCL macros
US5287461 *Oct 31, 1991Feb 15, 1994Sun Microsystems, Inc.Method and apparatus for remotely accessing a plurality of server consoles
US5307462 *Oct 21, 1992Apr 26, 1994Hewlett-Packard CompanySwitch for sharing a peripheral device
US5337229 *Jun 2, 1992Aug 9, 1994Balance Engineering CorporationShared interface for multiple controllers
US5432907 *May 12, 1992Jul 11, 1995Network Resources CorporationNetwork hub with integrated bridge
US5566306 *Dec 20, 1995Oct 15, 1996Seiko Epson CorporationTransfer control apparatus for independent transfer of data from a storage device to an I/O device over a secondary bus
US5584008 *Sep 11, 1992Dec 10, 1996Hitachi, Ltd.External storage unit comprising active and inactive storage wherein data is stored in an active storage if in use and archived to an inactive storage when not accessed in predetermined time by the host processor
US5590377 *Jun 7, 1995Dec 31, 1996Ast Research, Inc.Automatic control of distributed DMAs in a PCI bus system supporting dual ISA buses
US5680536 *Nov 29, 1995Oct 21, 1997Tyuluman; Samuel A.Dual motherboard computer system
US5712975 *Jan 31, 1995Jan 27, 1998Fujitsu LimitedInput/output cell in parallel computer and parallel computer system
US5721842Aug 25, 1995Feb 24, 1998Apex Pc Solutions, Inc.Interconnection system for viewing and controlling remotely connected computers with on-screen video overlay for controlling of the interconnection switch
US5732212Jan 13, 1994Mar 24, 1998Fox Network Systems, Inc.System and method for remote monitoring and operation of personal computers
US5757642 *Jun 27, 1997May 26, 1998Dell Usa L.P.Multi-function server input/output subsystem and method
US5848292 *Jun 19, 1996Dec 8, 1998Ncr CorporationSystem for data transmission between a wedge microcontroller and a personal computer microcontroller by disconnecting the keyboard microcontroller and placing the same in hold state
US5884096Nov 12, 1997Mar 16, 1999Apex Pc Solutions, Inc.Interconnection system for viewing and controlling remotely connected computers with on-screen video overlay for controlling of the interconnection switch
US5907689 *Dec 31, 1996May 25, 1999Compaq Computer CorporationComputer system
US5913034 *Aug 27, 1996Jun 15, 1999Compaq Computer Corp.Administrator station for a computer system
US5937176Nov 12, 1997Aug 10, 1999Apex Pc Solutions, Inc.Interconnection system having circuits to packetize keyboard/mouse electronic signals from plural workstations and supply to keyboard/mouse input of remote computer systems through a crosspoint switch
US5941963 *Feb 14, 1997Aug 24, 1999Paul CharlesFor electrically coupling a computer peripheral device to a computer
US6073188 *Jul 25, 1997Jun 6, 2000Compaq Computer CorporationElectronic switchbox for selection and sharing of internal peripheral devices among different computers, the internal peripheral devices located in slots of a chassis
US6098138 *Jul 11, 1997Aug 1, 2000Hewlett-Packard CompanyApparatus providing connectivity between devices attached to different interfaces of the apparatus
US6112264Feb 4, 1999Aug 29, 2000Apex Pc Solutions Inc.Computer interconnection system having analog overlay for remote control of the interconnection switch
US6308239 *Nov 5, 1997Oct 23, 2001Hitachi, Ltd.Interface switching apparatus and switching control method
US6321346 *Oct 20, 1999Nov 20, 2001Hitachi, Ltd.External storage
US6345323Jun 9, 2000Feb 5, 2002Apex, Inc.Computer interconnection system
US6378009 *Aug 20, 1999Apr 23, 2002Avocent CorporationKVM (keyboard, video, and mouse) switch having a network interface circuit coupled to an external network and communicating in accordance with a standard network protocol
US6378014 *Aug 25, 1999Apr 23, 2002Apex Inc.Terminal emulator for interfacing between a communications port and a KVM switch
US6401124 *Jan 13, 1999Jun 4, 2002Mustek Systems Inc.Network peripheral sharing system
US6473789 *Nov 23, 1999Oct 29, 2002Inventec CorporationNotebook/desktop docking system allowing both peripheral sharing and parallel processing
US6516385 *Jan 5, 2000Feb 4, 2003Hitachi, Ltd.Data sharing method and system between information processing systems with variable length block format to fixed length block format conversion
US6546450 *Dec 22, 1999Apr 8, 2003Intel CorporationMethod and apparatus for sharing a universal serial bus device among multiple computers by switching
US6567876 *Dec 3, 1999May 20, 2003Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Docking PCI to PCI bridge using IEEE 1394 link
US6624797 *Mar 29, 1999Sep 23, 2003Ati International SrlMethod and apparatus for providing video and control to a monitor
US6744810 *Dec 10, 1999Jun 1, 2004Intel CorporationSignal repeater for voltage intolerant components used in a serial data line
US6771213Jul 16, 2002Aug 3, 2004Jennifer DurstObject locator
US20020099899 *Jan 25, 2001Jul 25, 2002Shaw Ronald D.Bus isolation mechanism for sharing keyboard controller, super input output controller, and embedded controller devices
US20020103951 *Jan 26, 2001Aug 1, 2002Huber Gary DouglasRemovable personal digital assistant in a dual personal computer/personal digital assistant computer architecture
US20020129136 *Mar 8, 2002Sep 12, 2002Matharu Tarlochan S.System and method for wap server management using a single console
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1Adder, Products Brochure, APX 304572-304579, Apr. 1, 1998, 8 pages.
2AdderViewOSD, Products Brochure, RCI 173246-173279, Aug. 1, 2002.
3Apex et al., Products Brochure, APX 082949-083326, 1996.
4Apex PC Solutions, Users Guide, 1993.
5Apex, OutLook User Guide, 1997.
6Apex, Products Brochure, APX 018983-018996, Jan. 7, 1997.
7Apex, Products Brochure, APX 019103-019121, 1995-1996.
8Apex, Products Brochure, APX 056304-056346, Oct. 1, 1998.
9Apex, SwitchBack User Guide, 1995.
10Apex's Motion on the PolyCon Catalog and Supporting Memorandum, Jan. 15, 2002.
11Apex's Proposed Markman Findings, Jan. 25, 2002.
12Apex's Sales Brochure, Sep. 1, 1998, 1 page.
13Appendix1 to Apex's Proposed Markman Findings, Jan. 25, 2002.
14Avocent Redmond's Answering Pre-Markman Hearing Briefing (Jan. 18, 2005).
15Avocent Redmond's Supplemental Responses to Raritan's Second Set of Post-Remand Interrogatories (Nos. 15R-17R), Mar. 14, 2005.
16Avocent's Pre-Markman Hearing Memorandum in Support of its Proposed Claim Constructions (Dec. 15, 2004).
17Badman, Switching into High Gear, Network Computing, Apr. 30, 2001.
18Belkin, The OmniView Pro User Manual, Jul. 16, 2001.
19Bruce McNair Deposition Transcript, Case No. 01-CV-4435, May 5, 2005.
20Ching-I Hsu Deposition Transcript, Case No. 01-CV-4435, Mar. 11, 2005.
21Compaq, White papers, 1996, APX 083313-APX 083326, APX 083335-APX 083389.
22Cybex, 4 x P & 1 x P KVM Switches Guide to Applications, 1996.
23Cybex, Director Installer/User Guide, Nov. 1996.
24Datavision, Product Brochure, 1992, 3 pages.
25Declaration of Joseph C. McAlexander in Support of Apex's Motion for a Preliminary Injunction, Sep. 17, 2001.
26Declaration of Joseph C. McAlexander, III in the Civil Action No. 01-CV-4435, Dec. 15, 2004.
27Declaration of Sharad Malik, Ph. D., Jan. 8, 2002.
28Declaration of Sharad Malik, Ph.D. (Jan. 18, 2005).
29Defendant Raritan Computer Inc.'s Claim Construction Statement (Dec. 15, 2004).
30Defendant Raritan Computer Inc.'s Motion for Partial Summary Judgment (Jan. 8, 2002).
31Defendant Raritan Computer Inc.'s Proposed Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, Apr. 27, 2005.
32Defendant Raritan Computer Inc.'s Reply to Avocent's Proposed Claim Constructions (Jan. 18, 2005).
33Defendant Raritan Computer Inc.'s Response to Plaintiff's First Set of Post Remand Interrogatory Requirements to Raritan (No. 1R-16R). (Dec. 16, 2004).
34Defendant Raritan Computer, Inc.'s Response to Plaintiff's Second Set of Interrogatories (Nos. 9-12), Oct. 30, 2001.
35Defendant Raritan Computer, Inc.'s Second Set of Interrogatories to Plaintiff Apex, Nov. 16, 2001.
36Defendant Raritan Computer, Inc.'s Supplemental Response to Plaintiff's First Set of Interrogatories (Nos. 9-12), Aug. 31, 2001.
37Defendant Raritan Computer, Inc.'s Supplemental Response to Plaintiff's Second Set of Interrogatories (Nos. 9-12), Dec. 12, 2001.
38DEI, Central Control of Multiple PCs Without Massive Cabling, product brochure, Nov. 1992.
39Expert Report by Joseph C. McAlexander Regarding Infringement and Validity of U.S. Patent Nos. 5,884,096, 5,937,176 and 6,112,264, Jan. 3, 2001.
40Expert Report of Michael H. Davis, Jan. 13, 2002.
41Expert Report of Sharad Malik, Regarding Noninfringement and Invalidity of U.S. Patent Nos. 5,884,096, 5,937,176 and 6,112,264, Jan. 13, 2002. (Unexecuted).
42File History of Reissue U.S. Patent No. 5,732,212, Apr. 11, 2002.
43File History of U.S. Appl. No. 10/032,325, Jun. 14, 2004.
44File History of U.S. Patent No. 5,721,842, Feb. 24, 1998.
45File History of U.S. Patent No. 5,732,212, Mar. 24, 1998.
46File History of U.S. Patent No. 5,884,096, Mar. 16, 1999.
47File History of U.S. Patent No. 5,937,176, Aug. 10, 1999.
48File History of U.S. Patent No. 6,112,264, Aug. 29, 2000.
49Findings and Conclusions, Apex v. Raritan, Civil Action No. 01-CV-0035, Feb. 25, 2002.
50Investor's Business Daily, Box Keeps Monitors, Mice to a Minimum, Sep. 8, 1997.
51Joseph C. McAlexander Deposition Transcript, Case No. 01-CV-4435, Apr. 27, 2005.
52KVM Switch History, Aug. 2, 2002, 2 pages.
53KVM Switches Roundup, Windows NT Magazine, Jul. 1997.
54Lan Times, The beauty of Apex is a two-sided story, Nov. 20, 1995.
55Lightwave Communications, Inc., Product Brochure, APX 304594-304605, Jun. 1, 1998.
56Lu, E&J Int. 4-Port KVM Switch, Jul. 4, 2001.
57Marksman Transcript, Avocent v. Raritan, Civil Action No. 4435, Feb. 3, 2005.
58Marksman Transcript, Avocent v. Raritan, Civil Action No. 4435, Feb. 4, 2005.
59Memorandum and Order on Marksman issues, Case No. 01-CV-4435, (Mar. 11, 2005).
60Microsoft Computer Dictionary, 4th Edition; Published by Microsoft Press; Redmond, WA 98052-6399; Copyright 1999 by Microsoft Corporation. Pertinent Page: p. 154, "drive mapping".
61MSWindows 98 Resource Kit; Microsoft Professional Editions; The Technical Guide to Deploying Configuring and Supporting Windows 98 in Your Organization; Published by Microsoft Press; Redmond, WA 98052-6399; Copyright 1998 by Microsoft Corporation. Pertinent Pages: pp. 812-814.
62Network Computing, Product Brochure, May 15, 1995, 5 pages.
63Network Technologies Inc., Product Brochure, 1998, 2 pages.
64Network World, advisement, Jul. 6,1992.
65Ocean Isle, Reachout Product Brochure, RCI 172996-173006, Jun. 1994.
66PC World, New Products, May 1995, 2 pages.
67PolyCon GmbH Data System Inc., product catalogs, APX 024328-042697, prior to Spring, 1995.
68Press Release, Maintain Error-Free Central Control of 128 PCs from One Set of Keyboard, Mouse, and Monitor, Feb. 4, 1999, 1 page.
69Protest Under 37 CFR 1.291 Filed in U.S. Appl. No. 08/969,723, Feb. 13, 1999.
70Raritan, CompuSwitch, Mar. 16, 1998, 1 page.
71Raritan, Dominion KSX, Jul. 19, 2003, RCI 139356-139371.
72Raritan, Dominion KX and Dominion KSX, 2004, 181193-181211.
73Raritan, MasterConsole II, User's Manual, 2000.
74Raritan, MasterConsole MXU2, Jul. 31, 2001.
75Raritan, Paragon II User Manual, 2004.
76Raritan, Paragon UMT2161, RCI 147483-147505, Jul. 5, 2002.
77Raritan, Paragon User's Guide, Jun. 15, 2000.
78Raritan, Product Introduction, Oct. 23, 2000.
79Raritan, Products Brochure, 2004-2005, p. 185899-185912.
80Rebuttal Expert Report of Joseph C. McAlexander Regarding Validity and Infringement of U.S. Patent Nos. 5,884,096, 5,937,176 and 6,112,264, Apr. 11, 2005.
81Rextron, Product Brochure, Aug. 1, 2002, 5 pages.
82Rose Electronics, "Master Switch Installation and Operation Manual," 1991.
83Rose Electronics, Ultra View, Aug. 1, 2002, RCI 173332-173336.
84Rose Electronics, UltraView Installation and Operation Manual, 1991-1997.
85Startech Computer Products Ltd., Product Press Release, APX 304618-304619, Feb. 1998.
86Supplemental Expert Report of Bruce McNair Regarding United States Patent Nos. 5,884,096 & 6,112,264 and 5,937,176, Apr. 17, 2005.
87Supplemental Expert Report of Joseph C. McAlexander Regarding Infringement of U.S. Patent Nos. 5,884,096, 5,937,176 and 6,112,264, Mar. 22, 2005.
88Supplemental Expert Report of Michael H. Davis, Apr. 18, 2005.
89SwitchCom, ProServer, Aug. 1, 2002, 2 pages.
90Tikkler, Belkin OmniView SE 4-Port KVM Switch, Nov. 8, 2000.
91Tony Dekerf and Gary D. Davis, "A Close Look At Modern Keyboard, Video & Mouse Switches," 1995.
92Trial Transcript, Apex v. Raritan, Southern District of New York, Case No. 01-CV-4435, vol. 1-7, Jan. 2002.
93Tron International, Inc., KVM Products Catalogs, 1997.
94Tron International, Inc., Product Brochure, 1997, 4 pages.
95Tron International, Inc., Products Catalogs, 1996.
96Unisys, PW2 Advantage Series Rackmount Server, 1995.
97Wright Line, LMS Switch, 1994, 2 pages.
98Yee Liaw Deposition Transcript, Case No. 01-CV-4435, Mar. 3, 2005.
99Yee-Shung Liaw Deposition Transcript, Case No. 01-CV-4435, Dec. 6, 2001.
Classifications
U.S. Classification710/316, 710/303, 710/38, 709/226, 710/37, 710/304, 709/216
International ClassificationG06F13/00, G06F13/38
Cooperative ClassificationG06F13/385
European ClassificationG06F13/38A2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 10, 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: RARITAN AMERICAS, INC., NEW JERSEY
Effective date: 20120907
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION;REEL/FRAME:028924/0272
Owner name: RIIP, INC., NEW JERSEY
Owner name: RARITAN, INC., NEW JERSEY
Feb 29, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: WACHOVIA BANK, NEW YORK
Effective date: 20080117
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:RARITAN, INC.;REEL/FRAME:020582/0270