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Publication numberUS20140038722 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 13/567,629
Publication dateFeb 6, 2014
Filing dateAug 6, 2012
Priority dateAug 6, 2012
Publication number13567629, 567629, US 2014/0038722 A1, US 2014/038722 A1, US 20140038722 A1, US 20140038722A1, US 2014038722 A1, US 2014038722A1, US-A1-20140038722, US-A1-2014038722, US2014/0038722A1, US2014/038722A1, US20140038722 A1, US20140038722A1, US2014038722 A1, US2014038722A1
InventorsA. John Schmidt, John Teske, JR.
Original AssigneeUH.Publishing Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Universal virtual entity transformation
US 20140038722 A1
Abstract
A virtual entity from a first game is transformed to new virtual entity useable in a second game applying set of correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game and the characteristics available for defining a virtual entity in the second game to create a correlated set of characteristics. A new virtual entity is created from the correlated characteristics for use in the second game.
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Claims(20)
1. A method of transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game comprising the steps of:
a. Obtaining a set of created correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity;
b. applying the correlations to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game to create a set correlated characteristics;
c. creating a new virtual entity in the second game with the correlated characteristics
d. the created correlations and applying the correlations to create the new virtual entity being independent of a player selection or input, and
e. storing the created correlations in a non-transitory memory.
2. The method of claim 1 further comprising, quantifying at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is one.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is zero.
5. The method of claim 4 further comprising, defining the new virtual entity with at least one non-expressed characteristic, wherein the non-expressed characteristic is a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game having a zero correlation to the characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is one-to-many.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second to define a virtual entity is many-to-one.
8. The method of claim 1 further comprising, increasing at least one characteristic of the new virtual entity.
9. The method of claim 1 further comprising, creating correlations between characteristics defining at least one item possessed by virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define items available to virtual entities in the second game; applying the correlations to the characteristics defining the item in the first game to create a set of correlated item characteristics; and providing the new virtual entity in the second game with a new item corresponding to the correlated item characteristics.
10. The method of claim 1 further comprising, adjusting correlations according to a set of rules providing bonus and damages to the correlated characteristics.
11. An apparatus for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game comprising:
a. a processor;
b. a read-writable storage accessible by the processor capable of receiving a set of characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game.
c. a non-transitory computer readable medium accessible by the processor storing a set of correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity;
d. a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instructions which when executed by the processor apply the correlations to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game to create a set correlated characteristics; and
e. a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instructions which when executed create in a read-writable storage accessible by the processor a new virtual entity with the correlated characteristics for use in the second game, and
f. the created virtual entity being independent of a player selection or input.
12. The apparatus of claim 11 further comprising, a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instruction which when executed by the processor quantify at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game received by read-writable storage.
13. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is one.
14. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is zero.
15. The apparatus of claim 14 further comprising, a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instructions which when executed by the processor define the new virtual entity with at least one non-expressed characteristic, wherein the non-expressed characteristic is a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game having a zero correlation to the characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity.
16. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is one-to-many.
17. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein, at least one of the correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity is many-to-one.
18. The apparatus of claim 11 further comprising, a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instructions which when executed by the processor direct the processor to generate a user interface permitting a player to increase at least one characteristic of the new virtual entity.
19. The apparatus of claim 11 further comprising, a non-transitory computer readable medium accessible by the processor storing a set of correlations between characteristics defining at least one item possessed by virtual entity in the first game with characteristics defining items available to virtual entities in the second game; a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instructions which when executed by the processor apply the correlations to the characteristics defining the item in the first game to create a set a of correlated item characteristics; and a non-transitory computer readable medium storing a set of instructions which when executed by the processor create in a read-writable storage accessible by the processor a new item corresponding to the correlated item characteristics.
20. A computer program embodied on a computer readable medium for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be usable in a second game comprising:
a. a code segment to receive in a non-transitory read-writable storage a set of characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game.
b. a code segment to create set of correlated characteristics by applying to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game a set of correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics available in the second game to define a virtual entity;
c. a code segment to create in a read-writable storage a new virtual entity with the correlated characteristics for use in the second game, and
d. the created virtual entity being independent of a player selection or input.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    This invention relates to a apparatuses and methods for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game.
  • [0002]
    Various games utilize virtual entities as an integral and/or ancillary parts of the games operation. Virtual entities may take the form of a persona through which a player interacts with the world of a game. Virtual entities may also take the form of non-playable characters which may oppose, guide, assist and/or otherwise influence progression through a game. Accordingly, a virtual entity may be an ally, enemy, pet, guide, disease, poison, advance machine with a processor and/or an element of the background or scenery of the game.
  • [0003]
    Virtual entities are defined in games according to set of characteristics. The characteristics defining the virtual often include core attributes, skills, magic and/or powers. Core attributes characteristic generally define the general prowess of a virtual entity in utilizing a set of attributes that may include, but are not limited to, agility, capital, charisma, constitution, deduction, dexterity, employability, faith, imagination, intelligence, memory, strength and/or wisdom. Often core attributes influence the other types of characteristics defining the virtual entity. Skill characteristics define the precision, competency, knowledge, and/or ability of a virtual entity in certain topic or area, which may or may not result from training. Magic characteristics generally define a virtual entities proficiency in the arcane and may or may not include a set of spells. Powers characteristics define a virtual entity in terms of a trick and/or skill they can perform repeatedly, bypassing the rules governing magic and/or skill characteristics.
  • [0004]
    Characteristics, regardless of type, defining a virtual entity influence the interaction of the virtual entity with the game by providing benefits. A benefit is an advantage offered a virtual entity. A benefits may increase the likelihood the virtual entity will successfully perform an action, such as hitting a target with an arrow and/or maintaining footing in precarious terrain. In combination or the alternative, benefits may allow a certain action to be performed, such as, but not limited, building an item, extracting a resource or generating light. By providing benefits characteristics defining virtual entities influence game play greatly.
  • [0005]
    Despite similar titles, the characteristics defining virtual entities in various games can differ greatly in how they influence game play. Accordingly, a constitution characteristic defining a virtual entity in a first game may influence game play in manner not provided by any characteristic of second a game. It is also possible that a constitution characteristic defining a virtual entity in a first game may not influence game play in the same manner as similarly title characteristic in a second game. The varying and diverse influence characteristics may have on game play across games can make a direct conversion of a virtual entity from a first game to a second game in such a manner as to preserve the integrity of game play and/or the virtual entity difficult, if not impossible.
  • [0006]
    All US patents and applications and all other published documents mentioned anywhere in this application are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • [0007]
    Without limiting the scope of the invention a brief summary of some of the claimed embodiments of the invention is set forth below. Additional details of the summarized embodiments of the invention and/or additional embodiments of the invention may be found in the Detailed Description of the Invention below.
  • [0008]
    A brief abstract of the technical disclosure in the specification is provided as well only for the purposes of complying with 37 C.F.R. 1.72. The abstract is not intended to be used for interpreting the scope of the claims.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    The present invention relates to apparatuses and methods for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game. A set of correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game and the characteristics available for defining a virtual entity in the second game are applied to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game to create a correlated set of characteristics. A new virtual entity is created from the correlated characteristics for use in the second game.
  • [0010]
    Players spend considerable time, and in some cases money, developing virtual entities in a game. In many cases the virtual entity becomes an extension of the player themselves. Accordingly, preserving the integrity of the virtual entity and the personal investment becomes paramount. The steady release of new games offers players new worlds and/or gaming environments to explore. Exploring these new worlds and environments, however, requires a player to abandon his virtual entity in a first game and create a new virtual entity in the second game. Playing a new game, accordingly, causes the player to sacrifice his personal investment in the virtual entity of the first game. This sacrifice often discourages the player from playing new games. Consequently, the potential players and purchasers of a new game are limited to those willing and able to sacrifice the time and/or money invested in the virtual entity of the first game and reinvest the same to create a new virtual entity in the second game. The market for a new game, accordingly, may be increased by providing a means for players to transform virtual entities from a first game to a new virtual entity usable in the second in such a manner that preserves the integrity of the virtual entity.
  • [0011]
    Utilizing a set of correlation between characteristics defining a virtual entity in a first game and the characteristics available for defining a virtual entity in the second game, embodiments of the present invention transform a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game. Preferably the correlations between characteristics are based shared benefits. Thus characteristics defining the character in the first game are correlated to characteristics available in the second game by directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit to virtual entities in both games. Applying the correlations between characteristics to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game determines characteristics the new transformed virtual entity may have in the second game. Accordingly, a characteristic available in the second game providing the same or similar benefit as a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game may be related by a correlation of one. The characteristic providing the shared benefit would, therefore, be available to the new transformed virtual entity in the second game. In some instances a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game may provide multiple benefits which are provided by a set of multiple characteristics of the second game. In such case the correlation between characteristics would be one-to-many. Accordingly, there may be multiple characteristics available for the new transformed virtual entity in the second game derived from a single characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game. In combination or the alternative, a set of multiple characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game may provide benefits which are provided by a single characteristic of the second game, thereby creating a many-to-one correlation. Thus there may be a single characteristic available to the new transformed virtual entity in the second game derived from multiple characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game. Embodiments may also include instances in which a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game provides a benefit which is not provided by any characteristic of the second game resulting in a correlation of 0. A characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game, consequently, may not be available to the new transformed virtual entity in the second game. From the resulting set of correlated characteristics a new transformed virtual entity is created in the second game.
  • [0012]
    In some embodiments, before correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game and the characteristics available for defining a virtual entity in the second game are applied it may be necessary to first quantify at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game. For example, the first game may qualify all or at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity while the second game quantifies the respective correlated characteristics. In such a situation it may prove desirable to quantify the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game before generating correlated characteristics.
  • [0013]
    In addition to characteristics of the new the game sharing a benefit with characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game, in some embodiments the new transformed virtual entity may contain at least one unexpressed characteristic. An unexpressed characteristic will provide no benefits in the second game. It may, however, provide benefits in a subsequent game. Additionally, retaining characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game lacking a shared benefit with a characteristic of the second game facilitates transforming the new virtual entity to be usable again in the first game. The possession of unexpressed characteristics thus permits a better preservation of the integrity of the virtual entity and the personal investment the player made in the virtual entity.
  • [0014]
    Either before and/or after creation of the new transformed virtual entity, the player may be permitted to increase at least one characteristic. In some embodiments this may include obtaining a characteristic in the second game not present in the set of correlated characteristics. The new characteristic may provide a new benefit to new transformed virtual entity in the second game. In combination or the alternative, the new characteristic may provide a prerequisite required under the rules of the second game to possess a benefit the virtual entity had in the first game. It is also possible the new characteristic may provide a benefit better facilitating use of the new virtual entity in the second game, such as, but not limited to, interacting with other virtual entities and/or navigating the world of the second game.
  • [0015]
    In combination or the alternative, the characteristics defining the new transformed virtual entity in the second game may be adjusted according to rules providing bonuses and damages to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first and/or second game. This may be done for example, to accommodate for a change in race and/or class in the new transformed virtual entity. For example, the virtual entity in the first game may receive positive and/or negative adjustments in various characteristics as a result of being, for example, a dwarf fighter. In the second game there may be no dwarf race and/or no fighter class. As such, to preserve the integrity of the virtual entity in the second game it may be desirable to remove the race/class adjustments. Conversely, the second game may require players to assign a race and/or class to their virtual entities. Accordingly, complying with the rules of the new game may require the characteristics of the new virtual entity be adjusted according to the race and/or class selected. It may also be the case the rules defining a race and/or class, say elven ranger, in the first game may be different than the rules defining the same elven ranger race/class in the second game. Accordingly, in some embodiments characteristics may be adjusted to remove rules of first game and apply rules of the second of the game with respect to race and/or class.
  • [0016]
    In addition to making a personal investment in the virtual entity, players may also make a considerable personal investment in the equipment the virtual entity possesses in the first game. In some cases it may be that a player has spent more time, points and/or money providing his virtual entity with desirable equipment than developing the virtual entity's characteristics. Preserving the personal investment made by the player into the character may thus entail transforming items possessed by the virtual entity in the first game to new items usable in the second game. Utilizing a set of correlation between characteristics defining an item possessed by a virtual entity in a first game and the characteristics defining items available in the second game embodiments of the present invention may transform an item of a first game to a new item useable in a second game. Preferably the correlations between characteristics are based upon shared benefits such that characteristics defining the item in the first game are related to characteristics defining available items in the second game by directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit to items and/or a virtual entity wielding the item in both games. Applying the correlations between characteristics to the characteristics defining the item in the first game determines the characteristics available to define the new transformed item in the second game. Accordingly, a characteristic available in the second game providing the same or similar benefit as a characteristic defining the item in the first game may be related by a correlation of one. The new item in the second game may, therefore, possess at least one identical characteristic with the item in the first game. In some instances a characteristic defining the item in the first game may provide multiple benefits which are provided by a set of multiple characteristics of the second game. In such case the correlation between characteristics would be one-to-many. Accordingly, there may be multiple characteristics available for the defining the new item in the second game derived from a single characteristic defining the item in the first game. In combination or the alternative, a set of multiple characteristics defining the item in the first game may provide benefits which are provided by a single characteristic of the second game, thereby creating a many-to-one correlation. Thus there may be a single characteristic possessed by the new transformed item in the second game derived from multiple characteristics defining the item in the first game. Embodiments may also include instances in which a characteristic defining the item in the first game provides a benefit which is not provided by any characteristic of the second game resulting in a correlation of 0. A characteristic defining the item in the first game, consequently, may not be available to the new transformed item in the second game. From the resulting set of correlated characteristics a new transformed item is created in the second game.
  • [0017]
    These and other embodiments which characterize the invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed hereto and forming a part hereof. However, for a better understanding of the invention, its advantages and objectives obtained by its use, reference can be made to the drawings which form a further part hereof and the accompanying descriptive matter, in which there are illustrated and described various embodiments of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0018]
    A detailed description of the invention is hereafter described with specific reference being made to the drawings.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 depicts an embodiment of a process for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2 depicts an embodiment of a process quantifying characteristics defining a virtual entity.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3 depicts an embodiment of a process for obtaining correlations between characteristics defining virtual entities in a first game and second game.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 4 presents a theoretical relationship that may exist between core attributes in the first game and core attributes in the second game.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 5 presents a theoretical relationship that may exist between multiple skills of the first game and multiple skills of the second game.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 6 depicts a theoretical relationship that may exist between a skill of the first game and a skill in the second game.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 7 depicts an embodiment of a process for creating the new transformed virtual entity from a set of correlated characteristics.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 8 depicts an embodiment of a process for transforming an object from a first to be useable in a second game.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 9 depicts a possible embodiment of an apparatus transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0028]
    While this invention may be embodied in many different forms, there are described in detail herein specific embodiments of the invention. This description is an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the particular embodiments illustrated.
  • [0029]
    For the purposes of this disclosure, like reference numerals in the figures shall refer to like features unless otherwise indicated.
  • [0030]
    A possible embodiment of a process for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game is depicted in FIG. 1. Process 100 begins by first determining if the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game need to be quantified, Diamond 101. This may be required if at least a portion of the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game are qualified and at least a portion of the characteristics available for defining a virtual entity of in the second game are quantified. For example, a characteristic defining virtual entity in the first game may be rated as keen, dull, superior, divine etc., while at least one characteristic available in the second game may be quantified on a 100 point scale. Quantifying the characteristics defining the first character may not be necessary if both the first game and the second game utilized quantification and/or qualification to define characteristics of the same type. If required, at least one of the characteristics defining the virtual entity is quantified, Box 102. A possible embodiment of a process for quantifying characteristics defining the virtual entity that may be utilized is presented in FIG. 2 as process 200.
  • [0031]
    Determining whether at least one of the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game needs to be quantified and quantifying the characteristics as required may be performed at other stages in the process of transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game. Accordingly, alternative embodiments to process 100 may do so after the process has been initiated.
  • [0032]
    Process 100 then continues with obtaining a set of correlations between characteristics defining virtual entities in the first game (G1) and second game (G2), Box 103. The correlations between characteristics may be obtained by creating the correlations. A possible embodiment of a process for creating the correlations between characteristics is presented in FIG. 3 as process 300. In combination or the alternative, the correlations may be obtained by accessing a set of correlations between characteristics defining virtual entities in the first game and second game. Regardless of the method of obtaining, the correlations between characteristic preferably relate characteristics directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit to a virtual entity in first game and second game. In combination or the alternative, the correlations may only relate characteristics of the same type, such that, for example, a core attribute defining virtual entities in the first game is related to a core attribute defining virtual entities in the second game, and not a skill, power or magic. In some embodiments, a correlation between characteristics may relate a characteristic defining virtual entities in the first game to a characteristic of the same type defining virtual entities in the second game via at least one characteristic of a second type dependent upon one of the related characteristics of the first type.
  • [0033]
    After obtaining correlations between characteristics defining virtual entities in the first game and second game, process 100 continues by determining if the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game were adjusted as a result of the virtual entity's class, Diamond 104, and/or race, Diamond 106. If so, the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game are adjusted to remove any increases and/or penalties applied under the rules of the first game for the given class, Box 105, and/or race, Box 107. In the alternative, the correlations between characteristics obtained may take into account adjustments made under the rules of the first game for race and/or class. Accordingly, in some embodiments the correlations between characteristics obtained may include subtracting out and/or otherwise eliminating any adjustments made under the rules of the first game.
  • [0034]
    Determining whether adjustments made under the rules of the first on the basis the virtual entity's race and/or class need to be removed and removing such adjustment as desired may be performed at other stages in the process of transforming a virtual entity from a first game to a new virtual entity useable in a second game. Accordingly, alternative embodiments to process 100 may do so before obtaining correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entities in the first game and second game. Likewise, such adjustments may be removed at some point after the correlations between characteristics have been applied.
  • [0035]
    After the adjustment made under the rules of the first game on account of race and/or class have been removed as necessary, process 100 continues by applying the correlation between characteristics to create a set of correlated characteristics, Box 108. The correlation between characteristics are applied by adding to the set of correlated characteristics characteristics utilized in the second game to define a virtual entity that correlate with the at least one characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game. The resulting correlated characteristics, accordingly, represents a set of characteristics defining virtual entities in the second game directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit provided by at least on characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game. In addition to a relationship between characteristics defining virtual entities in the first and second game, some embodiments of the correlation between characteristics may include a function, ratio and/or other expression relating the value of at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game to the value of at least one characteristic utilized in the second game to define a virtual entity. In such embodiments, applying the correlations to generate a set of correlated characteristics may include setting the value of each characteristic added to the set according to the respective relationship between values.
  • [0036]
    In some embodiments, the correlated characteristics may include quantified and/or qualified characteristics. For instance, in embodiments in which at least one of the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game has not been quantified the correlated characteristics may include at least one qualified characteristic. In combination or the alternative, at least one of the characteristics defining the virtual entities in the second game may be qualified. In such embodiments, the correlated characteristic may also include at least one qualified characteristic. The characteristics included within the correlated set of characteristics may be quantified and/or qualified as defined by correlation between characteristics. In combination or the alternative, the correlated characteristics may include at least one characteristic that is neither quantified nor qualified, but rather just present.
  • [0037]
    After creating a set of correlated characteristics by applying the correlations between characteristics, process 100 continues by creating a new transformed virtual entity in the second game with the correlated characteristics, Box 109. A possible embodiment of a process for creating new virtual entity in the second game with the correlated characteristics is presented in FIG. 7 as process 700. Preferably, the new transformed entity created from the correlated characteristics is compliant with the rules of the second game.
  • [0038]
    Process 100 then continues by permitting the player to increase at least one characteristic defining the new transformed virtual entity. Characteristics may be increased by the player distributing points allocated and/or purchased. In some embodiments this may include obtaining a characteristic in the second game not present in the set of correlated characteristics. The new characteristic may provide a new benefit to the new transformed virtual entity in the second game. In combination or the alternative, the new characteristic may provide a prerequisite required under the rules of the second game to possess a benefit the virtual entity had in the first game. It is also possible the new characteristic may provide a benefit better facilitating use of the new transformed virtual entity in the second game, such as, but not limited to, interacting with other virtual entities and/or navigating the world of the second game.
  • [0039]
    Depicted in FIG. 2 is one embodiment of a process quantifying characteristics defining a virtual entity. Process 200 begins by defining the virtual entity's general prowess in a set of core attributes characteristics, Box 201. The general prowess of the virtual entity in at least one core attribute may be defined using a qualitative value. In combination or the alternative, general prowess in at least core attribute may be defined using a quantitative value. In some embodiments, the set of core attributes may include at least a portion of the core attributes characteristics utilized in the second game to define virtual entities.
  • [0040]
    Process 200 continues by obtaining a list of all of the skill characteristics the virtual entity possesses, Box 202. The list may be obtained by accessing a list of skill characteristics utilized to define virtual entities in the second game. In combination or the alternative, a list of skills may be obtained by assessing what the virtual entity can do in the first game.
  • [0041]
    A rank is then assigned to each skill characteristic, Box 203. Preferably, the rank assigned describes the effectiveness of the skill in the first game. The rank of at least one skill characteristic may be defined using a qualitative value. In combination or the alternative, rank of at least core skill may be defined using a quantitative value.
  • [0042]
    In process 200 a list of power characteristics the virtual entity possesses in the first game is also generated and each power characteristic is described in terms of the benefit provided, Box 204. Additionally, a list of magical characteristics is generated and each magical characteristic is described in terms of the benefits provided, Box 205.
  • [0043]
    Depicted in FIG. 3 is one embodiment of a process for obtaining correlations between characteristics defining virtual entities in a first game and second game. Process 300 may be repeated for each characteristic of the first game that may be used to define a virtual entity. In the alternative, process 300 may be repeated only for the subset of characteristics of the first game defining the virtual entity to be transformed. Process 300 begins by first relating characteristics of the first game to characteristics of the second game based on shared benefits, Box 301. This initial step may be repeated for each characteristic of the first game that may be used to define a virtual entity. In the alternative, it may be repeated only for the subset of characteristics of the first game defining the virtual entity to be transformed. FIGS. 4-6 depict theoretical results that may be obtained from Box 301. After characteristics of the first game have been related to characteristics of the second on the basis of shared benefits, process 300 continues by determining for each characteristics of the first game if the same and/or similar benefit the characteristic provides is provided by at least one characteristic of the second game, Diamond 301. If no such shared benefit exists, then the characteristic of the first game does not correlate with a characteristic of the second game and the correlation between characteristics for that characteristic of the first game is set to zero, Box 302.
  • [0044]
    For example, FIG. 6 presents a theoretical relationship that may exist between the skill of Engineering in the first game 601 and the skill of Engineering in the second game 602. As shown in FIG. 6, the skill of Engineering in the first game 601 provides benefits 605, 606, 607 and 608, but not benefits 603 and 604. The benefits provided by the skill of Engineering in the second game 602 include benefits 603 and 604, but do not include benefits 605, 606, 607 or 608. Accordingly, the skill of Engineering in the first game 601 shares no benefits with the skill of Engineering in the second game 602. As no shared benefit exists, the skill of Engineering of the game 601 does not correlate with a characteristic of the second game and thus the correlation between characteristics for skill of Engineering of the first game is set to zero.
  • [0045]
    If, however, a shared benefit does exist, then it is determined if the shared benefit is provided directly and/or indirectly by a characteristic of the same type in the first game and second game, Diamond 304. For example, FIG. 4 presents a theoretical relationship that may exist between the core attributes in the first game of Agility 401 and Strength 402 and the core attributes in the second game of Dexterity 403 and Strength 404. As shown in FIG. 4, the core attribute of Agility 401 in the first game provides benefits 405, 406, 408 and 409. In the second game the benefit of Increased Range Damage 406 is not provided by any characteristic. However, in the second game the skill Two-Handed Projectile Combat 413 provides the benefit of increased Ranged Attack Probability of Hitting 411. Benefits are similar if they accomplish the general effect. Accordingly, benefits 411 and 406 are similar in that both increase the effectiveness of range combat, and are thus related. The skill of Two-Handed Projectile Combat 413 is related to the core attribute of Dexterity 403 in the second game. The relationship may be such that proficiency in skill 413 is determined, governed and/or otherwise influenced by Dexterity 403. Regardless of the nature of the relationship between Dexterity 403 and the skill of Two-Handed Projectile Combat 413 in the second game, the core attribute of Agility 401 in the first game is indirectly related to the core attribute of Dexterity 403 in the second game via similar benefits 408 and 411 and skill 413 providing benefit 411. As Agility 401 and Dexterity 403 are both core attributes defining entities in the first game and second game, the shared benefit is provided by characteristics of the same type.
  • [0046]
    If, however, skill 413 was not related to Dexterity 403 in the second game, then relationship based on shared benefits would be between the core attribute of Agility 401 in the first game and the skill 413. As a skill is a different type of characteristic than a core attribute, the shared benefit would be provided by characteristics of the different type. The correlation between characteristics for Agility 401 of the first game would thus be set to zero, Box 303.
  • [0047]
    The theoretical example provided in FIG. 4, however, has a shared benefit provided by characteristics of the same type in the first game and second game. Process 300, accordingly, would continue by evaluating the shift in characteristics based on the degree of shared benefits, Box 309. A shift in characteristics based on shared benefits occurs when the shared benefits provided by one characteristic in the second game are provided by multiple characteristics in the first game. For example, Agility 401 correlates with core attributes Dexterity 403 and Strength 404 of the second game. As such, Agility 401 has a one-to-many correlation with the core attributes defining virtual entities in the second game. Dexterity 403, however, only correlates to Agility 401. Accordingly, Dexterity 403 only shares benefits with Agility 401. In other words, there is no shift in shared benefits with respect to Dexterity 403 to Agility 401. This is not the case for Strength 402 of the first game and Strength 404 of the second game.
  • [0048]
    As FIG. 4 shows, in the theoretical example Strength 404 of the second game shares the benefit of Increased Melee Damage 409 with core attributes of the first game Agility 401 and Strength 402. The correlation between Agility 401, Strength 402 and Strength 404 is thus may many-to-one. Accordingly, Strength 404 shares a benefit with Agility 401 and Strength 402. There is thus a shift in the benefits provided by the core attributes in that the shared benefits provided by Strength 404 in the second game are provided by Agility 401 and Strength 402 in the first game. The specific shift shown in FIG. 4 is that shared benefit 409 is provided by two core attributes in the first game, Agility 401 and Strength 402. In combination or the alternative, a shift could occur if a core attribute in the second game shared at least one benefit with a first core attribute of the first game and at least one other benefit with a second core attribute in the first game.
  • [0049]
    Once the shift in characteristics has been evaluated, process 300 proceeds by based on the type of characteristics being correlated, Diamond 305. If the characteristics are core attributes, process 300 continues by setting the correlation between attributes to quantify the shift, Box 310. In keeping with the theoretical example provided in FIG. 4, there is no shift between Dexterity 403 and Agility 401. As such, the correlation between the characteristics of Agility 401 and Dexterity 403 may be set to one. A shift, however, is present between Strength 404 and the core attributes Agility 401 and Strength 402 of the first game. The shift may be quantified by setting the correlation between these characteristics to be a function of Agility 401 and Strength 402 of the first game. Suitable functions may include, but are not limited to, an average, sum, weighted sum, weighted average or other statistic reflecting the contribution of the core attributes of the first game to the shared benefits provided by the correlated core attribute of the second game. In combination or the alternative, the correlation between the characteristics could be quantified by determining which core attributes of the first game share more benefits with the correlated core attribute of the second game and setting the correlation as a function of only those core attributes form the first game. The correlation may also be quantified, in combination or the alternative, by determining which core attributes of the first game have a higher degree of overlap with the correlated core attribute of the second game and setting the correlation as a function of only those core attributes form the first game.
  • [0050]
    If it is determined the characteristics are of the skill type process 300 would continue by determining the training required to obtain the correlated skills, Diamond 311. Preferably this determination is made with the respect to the rules of the second game. Process 300 is an embodiment in which the skills in the second game are obtained by training the mind or body. In other embodiments skills may be obtained by training in additional areas such as, but not limited to, wealth, soul and/or resources.
  • [0051]
    In keeping with process 300, if it is determined the correlated skills require training of the body, it would next be determined if the performing the skill requires the use of equipment, Diamond 312. For instance, a virtual entity may have a Wrestling skill in the first game that correlates with a Combat Unarmed skill in the second game. As the use of these correlated skills does not require equipment, the correlation between skills could be set to one, Box 313. In combination or the alternative, the virtual entity may have Swordsmanship skill in the first game the correlates with a Combat One-Handed Blade skill in the second game. The use of these correlated skills requires a bladed weapon of some sort. As such, process 300 would proceed by evaluating the shift in equipment between the two games, Box 314. A shift in equipment may occur, for example, if the first game includes only Bronze Age weapons and the second game includes forged steel weapons. Assuming both types of weapons can be effectively used with similar techniques, there would be small shift in equipment do to the different properties of the weapons. The correlation between the skill characteristics of Swordsmanship and Combat One-Handed Blade would then be set to quantify the shift in equipment and characteristics, Box 315. The small shift in equipment may be quantified by setting the correlation between the characteristics to a ratio close to one and/or subtracting a small portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the skill.
  • [0052]
    In alternative, the first game may include only Bronze Age weapons and the second game may include forged steel weapons similar those found in feudal Japan. It may not be possible to use both types of weapons effectively with similar techniques. Accordingly, there may be a large shift in equipment do to the different techniques required to use the weapons. The correlation between the skill characteristics of Swordsmanship and Combat One-Handed Blade may thus have to be set to quantify a large shift in equipment, Box 315, by setting the correlation between the characteristics to a ratio close to 0.5 and/or subtracting a moderate and/or larger portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the skill.
  • [0053]
    In keeping with process 300, if it is determined the correlated skills require training of the mind and/or otherwise acquiring knowledge, Diamond 311, it would next be determined if the subject matter of the knowledge required for performing the correlated skills, Diamond 316. Preferably the determination is made with the respect to the rules of the second game. Process 300 is an embodiment in which the skills in the second game require knowledge of Technology or Natural Resources. In other embodiments skills may require knowledge in additional and/or different areas such as, but not limited to, beliefs, commerce, portals, energy, genetics, magic, physics and/or transportation.
  • [0054]
    In keeping with FIG. 3, if the correlated skills' subject matter of knowledge is determined to be natural resources, process 300 would continue by evaluating the shift in the worlds of the first and second game with respect to natural resources, Box 317. For instance, if the first and second game may both take place in a world model after Earth, there would be small shift in worlds. The correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may be set to quantify the small shift in knowledge and characteristics, Box 315, by setting the correlation between the characteristics to a ratio close to one and/or subtracting a small portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the skill.
  • [0055]
    In alternative, the second game may take place on Mars creating a large shift between the world of the first game and the world of the second game. The correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may thus have to be set to quantify a large shift in worlds Box 315, by setting the correlation between the characteristics to a ratio close to 0 and/or subtracting a moderate and/or larger portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the skill.
  • [0056]
    Likewise, if the correlated skills' subject matter of knowledge is determined to be technology, process 300 would continue by evaluating the shift in technology between the first game and the second game, Box 318. For instance, if the first and second game may both take place in a world model after Medieval Europe, there would be small shift in technology. The correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may then be set to quantify the small shift in technology and characteristics, Box 320, by setting the correlation between the characteristics to a ratio close to one and/or subtracting a small portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the skill.
  • [0057]
    In alternative, the second game may take place on a Mars colony. In such a situation their may be large shift between the games in technology as a spacefaring society would have more advanced technology at its disposal than a society in Medieval Europe. The correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may thus have to be set to quantify a large shift in worlds Box 320, by setting the correlation between the characteristics to a ratio close to 0 and/or subtracting a moderate and/or larger portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the skill.
  • [0058]
    In addition to quantifying shifts in equipment, worlds and technology, the correlation between skills characteristics of the first game and the second game also quantify the shift in the correlated skill characteristics based on the degree of shared benefits, Boxes 315, 319 and 320. For example, FIG. 5 presents a theoretical relationship that may exist between the skills of Mining 501 and Blacksmithing 502 of a first game and the skills of Geology/Mining 503, Mountaineering 503 and Smithing 504 in a second game. In the theoretical example depicted in FIG. 5, Mining 501 of the first game correlates with Geology/Mining 503 of the second game based on the shared benefits 306, 307 and 308. As the benefits provided by Geology/Mining 503 in the first game are only provided by Mining 501 in the first game, there is no shift in characteristics based on shared benefits. The correlation between the characteristics for Mining 501 and Geology/Mining 503, accordingly, may only reflect the shifts in the games with respect to the subject of knowledge required for the skill of Geology/Mining 503. As indicated in FIG. 5, the subject of knowledge for Geology/Mining is natural resources. Accordingly, if both first game and the second game take place on a world model after Earth, then the shift in games with respect to natural resources would be small. The correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may thus be set to quantify the shift in natural resources and characteristics, Box 319, by setting the correlation between Mining 501 and Geology/Mining 503 to a ratio close to one and/or subtracting a small portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of the Mining 501.
  • [0059]
    In the alternative, the second game may take place Mars creating a large shift between the first game and second game with respect to natural resources. The correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may thus have to be set to quantify a large shift in natural resources, Box 319, by setting the correlation between Mining 501 and Geology/Mining 503 to a ratio closer to zero and/or subtracting a moderate and/or larger portion from the qualified and/or quantified value of Mining 501.
  • [0060]
    Unlike Geology/Mining 503, in the theoretical example of FIG. 5, there is a many-to-one relationship between the skills of Mining 501 and Blacksmithing 502 of the first game and Smithing 505 in the second game. Accordingly, the shared benefits 510, 511 and 512 provided by Smithing 505 are provided by Mining 501 and Blacksmithing 502 in the first game. Thus, there is a shift between the correlated skills of Mining 501, Blacksmithing 502 and Smithing 505. The shift may be quantified by setting the correlation between these skills characteristics to be a function of Mining 501 and Blacksmithing 502 of the first game. Suitable functions may include, but are not limited to, an average, sum, weighted sum, weighted average or other statistic reflective of the contribution of the skills of the first game to the shared benefits provided by the correlated skill of the second game. As indicated in FIG. 5, the subject of knowledge for Smithing 505 is technology. Accordingly, the correlation between the correlated skill characteristics may have to be set to quantify a shift in technology as well as a shift in the characteristic, Box 320. This may be done by using a fraction and/or portion of the value for Mining 501 and/or Blacksmithing 502 to calculate the respective statistic. In combination or the alternative, the value of Smithing 505 may be determined from a fraction and/or portion of the relative statistic.
  • [0061]
    In combination or the alternative, the correlation between the skill characteristics could be quantified by determining if Mining 501 or Blacksmithing 502 share more benefits with the Smithing 505 and setting the correlation between characteristic to be a fraction and/or portion of only that skill form the first game. The correlation may also quantify shift in technology and shift in characteristic, in combination or the alternative, by determining if Mining 501 or Blacksmithing 502 has a higher degree of overlap with the Smithing 505 and setting the correlation between characteristic to be a fraction and/or portion of only that skill form the first game.
  • [0062]
    Shifts in equipment, knowledge, and/or characteristics between the first game and the second game may be obtained by evaluation and/or accessing a source of pre-evaluated values.
  • [0063]
    Returning to Box 305 of FIG. 3, if it is determined the characteristics are of the spell or power type the process 300 continues by determining if the spells share the same and/or similar origin in the first game and second game, Diamond 306. A power is a characteristic that permits the virtual entity to receive a benefit repeatedly bypassing the normal rules of training and skills. The origin of a power may be the race and/or class of the virtual entity. In combination or the alternative, the origin of a power may be the environment of the first game. For example, a power possessed by the virtual entity in the first game may have come about as the result of an experience the virtual entity had with something present in the first game. In combination or the alternative, a power could be something systemic to the virtual entity, such as, but limited, something in the virtual entity's DNA. If the correlated power characteristics share the same origin in the first and a second game, the correlation between the power characteristics is set to one, Box 307, otherwise the correlation is set to zero, Box 308. For example, the first game may permit a power providing the benefit of increased strength as a result of exposure to radiation. The second game, however, may a permit power providing increased strength as a result of being a particular race. In such a scenario, the origins of the power characteristic will be different between the first game and second and the correlation between the power characteristics would be set to zero.
  • [0064]
    Process 300 evaluates magic characteristics similar to power characteristics. In some embodiments magic characteristic may comprise a collection of spells the virtual entity possess in the first game that provide a benefit when cast. The spells possessed may originate in the first game from a particular school of arcane knowledge, such as but not limited, colored magic, necromancy, illusion, wizardly, witchcraft, sorcery and/or elemental magic. If the correlated magic characteristics originate from the same and/or similar source in the first and a second game, the correlation between the magic characteristics is set to one, Box 307, otherwise the correlation is set to zero, Box 308. For example, a virtual entity may possess a meteor shower spells that provides the benefit of causing meteors to fall from the sky. In the first game the spell may originate from the arcane knowledge of fire. In the second game, however, the correlated spell may originate from the black magic. In such a scenario, the origins of the spells would be different between the first game and second and the correlation between the magic characteristics would be set to zero.
  • [0065]
    In some embodiments, magic and power characteristics may be treated as the same type of characteristics. Accordingly, a power and/or magic characteristic in the first game may correlate with a power and/or magic characteristic in the second game. For example, in some embodiments a power characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first which provides the benefit of super strength may correlate with a spell characteristic of the second game providing the benefit of levitating objects. The correlation between the power and spell characteristics may be set one. In combination or the alternative, the correlation may be set to preserve the integrity of the characteristic in the first game. For example, utilizing super strength to left an object would require the virtual entity to physically contact the object to be lifted. If the spell of the second game providing the benefit of levitating objects is defined by a range value, the correlation may be set such that the range of the spell is zero as to require the new transformed virtual entity to be in direct contact with an object to levitate it.
  • [0066]
    Depicted in FIG. 7 is one embodiment of a process 700 for creating the new transformed virtual entity from the correlated characteristics. Process 700 begins by first determining if new transformed virtual entity for use in the second game will be allowed to possess unexpressed characteristics, Diamond 701. An unexpressed characteristic is a characteristic possessed by the virtual entity in the first game and retained by the new transformed virtual entity, though it does not provide any benefit in the second game. An unexpressed characteristic may be a characteristic possessed by the virtual entity in the first game lacking a shared benefit with at least one characteristic from the second game. In combination or the alternative, an unexpressed characteristic may be a characteristic from the first game that shares a benefit with at least one characteristic from the first second but was factored when setting the correlations between characteristic to quantify shifts in characteristics and/or other shifts between the first game and second game. Permitting the new transformed virtual entity to possess unexpressed characteristic may facilitate subsequent transformation of the virtual entity to be usable again in the first game and/or other games having at least one characteristic providing a shared benefit with at least one of the unexpressed characteristics. Accordingly, permitting unexpressed characteristics may preserve the integrity and versatility of the virtual entity.
  • [0067]
    If unexpressed characteristics are permitted process 700 continues by identifying all characteristics of the virtual entity in the first game having a correlation between characteristics of zero, Box 702. All such characteristics are then given to the new transformed virtual entity at their original value and set to unexpressed, Box 703. In addition, the identity of the first game may also be associated with unexpressed characteristics and/or the benefits provided as to permit more accurate use in determining correlations between characteristics in subsequent transformations of virtual entity to be useable in other games. Accordingly, in some embodiments the correlations between characteristics defining virtual in three or more games may be obtained.
  • [0068]
    After the new transformed virtual entity has been provided with unexpressed characteristics or it is determined unexpressed characteristics will not be permitted, process 700 continues by obtaining for each characteristic a conversion between scoring of the characteristic in the first game and scoring of correlated characteristic in the second game, Box 704. For example, the value of a characteristic in the first game may be more difficult to increase than its correlated characteristic in the first game such that every point in the first game is worth ten in the second. In combination or the alternative, the first game may quantify and the second game may qualify correlated characteristics. In some embodiments, accordingly, a conversion form quantified to qualified and/or qualified to quantify values may be utilized. Additionally, characteristics of the first game may, in some embodiments, be expressed using multiple values. For example, a power and/or spell characteristic of the first game may be expressed with values defining parameters such as, but not limited to, power, duration, frequency and/or range. Accordingly, in some embodiments a conversion between multiple scores of a characteristic in the first game and correlated characteristic in the second game may be obtained. If the correlation between characteristic obtained already factor in the scoring conversion between the correlated characteristics, this step may be omitted. Conversions between scoring may be obtained by calculating and/or accessing a source of pre-calculated values.
  • [0069]
    If the scoring conversion has not been applied as part of the correlation between characteristics or otherwise, process 700 continues by applying the scoring conversion to each correlated characteristic generated by applying the correlations between characteristics, Box 705. Returning the theoretical example presented in FIG. 5, final functions taking into account shifts in characteristics, knowledge, and conversions between scoring may be: Geology/Mining G2=(Mining G1−3)*5; Mountaineering G2=(Mining G1−6)*2.5; and Smithing G2=(((Mining G1/3)+(2*Blacksmithing G1/3))−3)*5.
  • [0070]
    Process 700 then proceeds by determining if the new transformed virtual entity will have a particular race and/or class, Diamond 706. If so, the correlated characteristics are adjusted to incorporate any increases and/or penalties applied under the rules of the second game for the given class, Box 707.
  • [0071]
    Process 700 then continues by determining if the rules of the second game permit a direct conversion of the correlated characteristics into a virtual entity, Diamond 708. The correlated characteristics, for example, may not contain a value for a core attribute characteristic of the second game. This may occur as a result of a core attribute characteristic of the second game not correlating with any characteristic of the first game. The rules of the second game may not permit the resulting value of zero for the core attribute characteristic. It is also possible, in combination or the alternative, the correlated characteristics may contain characteristics requiring a prerequisite not present within the correlated characteristics. In combination or the alternative, the correlated characteristics may contain more of certain type of characteristics than permitted under the rules of the second game. It is also possible in some embodiments the correlated characteristics may contain characteristics the rules of the second game do not a permit a virtual entity of the class and/or race chosen to possess. If these and/or other violations of the rules of the second are present, the correlated characteristics are adjusted to make the new transformed virtual entity compliant with the rules of the second game, Box 709. In some embodiments this may be done by changing the race and/or class of the new transformed virtual entity. In combination or the alternative, required characteristics may be assigned a random value or a value believed to reflect the general characteristics of the virtual entity in the first game and/or otherwise preserve integrity of the virtual entity. The player in the same or alternative embodiments may be given a subsequent opportunity to increase a characteristic as to provide the new transformed virtual entity with a required prerequisite. In combination or the alternative, characteristic may be eliminated, set to unexpressed, and/or reduced to make the new transformed virtual entity compliant with the rules of the second game. If, however, the rules of the second game permit a direct conversion of the correlated characteristics into a virtual entity, then a new transformed virtual entity usable in the second game is created directly from the correlated characteristics, Box 710. Additionally, the identity of the first game may also be associated with characteristics possessed by the new transformed virtual entity and/or the benefits provided by the characteristics as to permit more accurate use in determining correlations between characteristics in subsequent transformations of virtual entity to be useable in other games. Accordingly, in some embodiments the correlations between characteristics defining virtual in three or more games may be obtained.
  • [0072]
    In addition to transforming a virtual entity to be useable in the second game, embodiments may transform an object possessed by the virtual entity in the first to game to be useable as a new transformed object in the second game. A possible embodiment of a process for transforming an object from a first to be useable in a second game is depicted in FIG. 8. Process 800 begins by first determining if the characteristics defining the object in the first game need to be quantified, Diamond 801. This may be required if at least one of the characteristics defining the object entity in the first game are qualified and at least one of the characteristics available for defining an object in the second game are quantified. If required, at least one of the characteristics defining the object is quantified, Box 802. Determining whether at least one of the characteristics defining the object in the first game needs to be quantified and quantifying the characteristics as required may be performed at other stages in the process of transforming an object from a first game to be useable in a second game. Accordingly, alternative embodiments to process 800 may do so after the process has been initiated.
  • [0073]
    Process 800 then continues with obtaining a set of correlations between characteristics defining objects in the first game (G1) and second game (G2), Box 803. The correlations between characteristics may be obtained by creating the correlations. A possible embodiment may use a process analogous to process 300 presented in FIG. 3. In combination or the alternative, the correlations may be obtained by accessing a set of correlations between characteristics defining objects in the first game and second game. Regardless of the method of obtaining, the correlations between characteristic preferably relate characteristics directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit to an object in first game and second game. In combination or the alternative, the correlations may only relate characteristics of the same type In some embodiments, a correlation between characteristics may relate a characteristic defining objects in the first game to a characteristic of the same type defining objects in the second game via at least one characteristic of a second type dependent upon one of the related characteristics of the first type.
  • [0074]
    After obtaining correlations between characteristics defining objects in the first game and second game, process 800 continues by applying the correlation between characteristics to create a set of correlated characteristics, Box 804. The correlation between characteristics are applied by adding to the set of correlated characteristics characteristics utilized in the second game to define an object that correlate with the at least one characteristics defining the object in the first game. The resulting correlated characteristics, accordingly, represents a set of characteristics defining objects in the second game directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit provided by at least one characteristic defining the object in the first game. In addition to a relationship between characteristics defining objects in the first and second game, some embodiments of the correlation between characteristics may include a function, ratio and/or other expression relating the value of at least one characteristic defining the object in the first game to the value of at least one characteristic utilized in the second game to define an object. In such embodiments, applying the correlations to generate a set of correlated characteristics may include setting the value of each characteristic added to the set according to the respective relationship between values.
  • [0075]
    In some embodiments, the correlated characteristics may include quantified and/or qualified characteristics. In combination or the alternative, the correlated characteristics may include at least one characteristic that is neither quantified nor qualified, but rather just present.
  • [0076]
    After creating a set of correlated characteristics by applying the correlations between characteristics, process 800 continues by creating a new transformed object useable in the second game with the correlated characteristics, Box 805. A possible embodiment may use a process analogous to any of the various processes for creating a new transformed virtual entity useable in the second game with the correlated characteristics presented above. Preferably, the new transformed object created from the correlated characteristics is compliant with the rules of the second game.
  • [0077]
    The present invention may be embodied in apparatus for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game. A possible embodiment of such an apparatus is depicted in FIG. 9. As shown in FIG. 9, apparatus 900 comprises a processor 901 and a read-writable storage 902 accessible by processor 901 capable of receiving a set of characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game. Storage 902 may receive a set of characteristics defining the virtual entity by receiving a file containing the characteristics downloaded from a remote server and/or computer, accessing a file on a content server, and/or receiving user input.
  • [0078]
    Accessible by processor 901 is a non-transitory computer readable medium 903 storing a set of correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics defining virtual entities in the second game. The correlations between characteristics stored on medium 903 preferably relate characteristics directly or indirectly providing the same or similar benefit to a virtual entity in first game and second game. In combination or the alternative, the correlations may only relate characteristics of the same type. In some embodiments, a correlation between characteristics may relate a characteristic defining virtual entities in the first game to a characteristic of the same type defining virtual entities in the second game via at least one characteristic of a second type dependent upon one of the related characteristics of the first type. In some instances a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game may provide multiple benefits which are provided by a set of multiple characteristics of the second game. In such a case the correlation between characteristics would be one-to-many. Accordingly, there may be multiple characteristics available for the new transformed virtual entity in the second game derived from a single characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game. In combination or the alternative, a set of multiple characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game may provide benefits which are provided by a single characteristic of the second game, thereby creating a many-to-one correlation. Thus there may be a single characteristic available to the new transformed virtual entity in the second game derived from multiple characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game. Embodiments may also include instances in which a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game provides a benefit which is not provided by any characteristic of the second game resulting in a correlation of zero.
  • [0079]
    Non-transitory computer readable medium 903 also stores a set of instructions which when executed by processor 901 applies the correlations to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game to create a set correlated characteristics. The instructions may encode any of the various processes for applying correlation between characteristics to create a set of correlated characteristic presented above. Additionally stored on non-transitory computer readable medium 903 is a set of instructions which when executed create in a read-writable storage 904, also accessible by processor 901, a new virtual entity with the correlated characteristics for use in the second game. The instructions may encode any of the various processes for creating a new transformed virtual entity useable in the second game with the correlated characteristics presented above. In some embodiments, the instructions stored on medium 903 may, when executed by processor 901, define the new virtual entity with at least one non-expressed characteristic, wherein the non-expressed characteristic is a characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game having a zero correlation to the characteristics defining the virtual entities in the second game.
  • [0080]
    Non-transitory computer readable medium 903 additionally stores a set of instruction which when executed by processor 901 quantify at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity in the first game received by read-writable storage 902. The instructions stored on medium 903 may encode any of the various processes for quantifying at least one characteristic defining the virtual entity presented above.
  • [0081]
    Non-transitory computer readable medium 903 also stores a set of instructions which when executed by processor 901 directs processor 901 to generate a user interface permitting a user to increase at least one characteristic of the new virtual entity.
  • [0082]
    Non-transitory computer readable medium 903 additionally stores a set of correlations between characteristics defining at least one item possessed by a virtual entity in the first game with characteristics defining items available to virtual entities in the second game. A set of instructions stored on non-transitory computer readable medium 903 apply the correlations to the characteristics defining the item in the first game to create set a correlated item characteristics. The instructions stored on medium 903 may encode any of the various processes for applying correlations between characteristics to create a correlated item characteristics presented above. Non-transitory computer readable medium 903 additionally stores a set of instructions which when executed by the processor create in a read-writable storage 904 a new item corresponding to the correlated item characteristics. The instructions may encode any of the various processes for creating a new transformed object useable in the second game with correlated item characteristics presented above
  • [0083]
    The present invention may be embodied by a computer program on a computer readable medium for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be usable in a second game. Embodiments of such a program may include a code segment to receive in a read-writable storage a set of characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game; a code segment to create set of correlated characteristics by applying to the characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game a set of correlations between characteristics defining the virtual entity in the first game with characteristics defining virtual entities in the second game; a code segment to create in a read-writable storage a new virtual entity with the correlated characteristics for use in the second game. The code segments may encode any of the various processes for applying correlation between characteristics to create a set of correlated characteristic and any of the various processes for creating a new transformed virtual entity useable in the second game with the correlated characteristics presented above.
  • [0084]
    In combination or the alternative to any of the process presented above for transforming a virtual entity from a first game to be useable in a second game, quantifying characteristics defining a virtual entity, obtaining correlations between characteristics defining virtual entities in a first game and second game, creating the new transformed virtual entity from a set of correlated characteristics, and/or transforming an object from a first to be useable in a second game embodiment of the present invention may utilizes such processes as described in Universal Horizons Players' Guide, ISBN 978-0-9858986-0-1, a copy of which is appended to this disclosure, and the teachings of which are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • [0085]
    The above disclosure is intended to be illustrative and not exhaustive. This description will suggest many variations and alternatives to one of ordinary skill in this field of art. All these alternatives and variations are intended to be included within the scope of the claims where the term “comprising” means “including, but not limited to.” Those familiar with the art may recognize other equivalents to the specific embodiments described herein which equivalents are also intended to be encompassed by the claims.
  • [0086]
    Further, the particular features presented in the dependent claims can be combined with each other in other manners within the scope of the invention such that the invention should be recognized as also specifically directed to other embodiments having any other possible combination of the features of the dependent claims. For instance, for purposes of claim publication, any dependent claim which follows should be taken as alternatively written in a multiple dependent form from all prior claims which possess all antecedents referenced in such dependent claim if such multiple dependent format is an accepted format within the jurisdiction (e.g. each claim depending directly from claim 1 should be alternatively taken as depending from all previous claims). In jurisdictions where multiple dependent claim formats are restricted, the following dependent claims should each be also taken as alternatively written in each singly dependent claim format which creates a dependency from a prior antecedent-possessing claim other than the specific claim listed in such dependent claim below.
  • [0087]
    This completes the description of the preferred and alternate embodiments of the invention. Those skilled in the art may recognize other equivalents to the specific embodiment described herein which equivalents are intended to be encompassed by the claims attached hereto.
Patent Citations
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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/42, 463/43
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationA63F13/58, A63F13/60, A63F2300/5553
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